Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [new_distillers] Legilative Contact Tracking Report for Legalization Update [1 Attachment]

Expand Messages
  • Derek Hamlet
    ... I don t live in the United States of kowtowing to the Tea Party, but any effort that succeeds in legalizing hobby distilling is obviously a good thing. I
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 21, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      At 08:22 AM 10/21/2013, you wrote:
      >
      >[Attachment(s) from Alli Bugger included below]
      >
      >Hello All,
      >It has been kind of quiet for us since the circus has been in town,
      >but hopefully our loyal representatives can think about working for
      >us instead of fighting each other for a while.
      >I have attached an updated copy of the Tracking Report for Legalization.

      I don't live in the United States of kowtowing to the Tea Party,
      but any effort that succeeds in legalizing hobby distilling is
      obviously a good thing.
      I am hopeful because I think I see signs. Here's my very rude and
      rough analysis.
      When I was a kid in the late 40s (that's 1949s not 1840s), the making
      of wine and beer at home was illegal. It was more or less ignored,
      but still illegal. Then almost overnight in the mid 50s it was legalized.
      Why is distilling at home illegal.
      1. the big distillery lobby
      2. fear on the part of government in losing taxes
      3. health concerns from the possibility of "bad booze"

      I reckon #3 is bogus and that #1 and #2 are alive and well.
      But, there is a crack in the foundation. States have recently and
      very quickly liberalized the licensing of boutique distilleries and
      they are doing very well. AT first it was mainly vodka type products
      probably because they are relatively quick, inexpensive and gets a
      product to market. Now I see virtually all of them moving to corn
      whiskys, rye whiskys and some exotic stuff. Just as the craft beer
      revolution created a whole sub culture of discerning beer drinkers
      without really affecting the Bud/Miller crowd, the boutique
      distillery movement is attracting the aficianados without probably
      affecting the vast majority of consumers.

      The next step is to keep lobbying for a hobby exception.
      There will of course be those saying it will just bring back
      bootlegging. Crap. Those who are into that will be into it anyway.
      Of course we are all aware of the folks who make vast quantities of
      beer and sell it at football stadiums etc. out of the trunk of their car NOT!
      I remain hopeful.
      For me it is not an issue. I can buy what I need here and just don't
      make a big deal out of it by boasting etc.
      What I'd like to do though is be able to craft stuff and compete in
      little competitions. I enter my wine into contests every year. I'm
      always surpries; the stuff I really like get pleasant nods and
      sometimes the things I'm not so sure of end up winning bronze or
      silver medals. Go figure.


      Derek
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.