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Jerry McCullough said:

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  • Tom Robins
    Jerry McCullough said: Think about this Why do the bourbon distillers only use their charred oak barrels once? The aging process removes the constituents
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 14, 2013
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      Jerry McCullough said:

      " Think about this "Why do the bourbon distillers only use their charred oak barrels once?" The aging process removes the constituents of the white oak wood that add the flavors to the"


      Wrong.  They do it because it is federal law that was put into place around the time of prohibition to protect the cooperage industry.  Most bourbon barrels are sold to overseas whiskey distillers who use them several times before recyclying (Cleaning and recharring to use them again).

      A new barrel can easily be used 5-6 batches before recycling for hobby users.  The later batches require longer stays in the barrel for similar aging results.




    • RLB
      you are correct that its a federal law, but that law is really out dated.  When we can do the same thing just by adding charred wood to a glass jar, stainless
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 14, 2013
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        you are correct that its a federal law, but that law is really out dated.  When we can do the same thing just by adding charred wood to a glass jar, stainless steel drum, or a clay pot.


        From: Tom Robins <varocketry@...>
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 11:47 PM
        Subject: [new_distillers] Jerry McCullough said:

         
        Jerry McCullough said:

        " Think about this "Why do the bourbon distillers only use their charred oak barrels once?" The aging process removes the constituents of the white oak wood that add the flavors to the"


        Wrong.  They do it because it is federal law that was put into place around the time of prohibition to protect the cooperage industry.  Most bourbon barrels are sold to overseas whiskey distillers who use them several times before recyclying (Cleaning and recharring to use them again).

        A new barrel can easily be used 5-6 batches before recycling for hobby users.  The later batches require longer stays in the barrel for similar aging results.


      • Rick Wrightson
        not only is he correct that it is federal law and correct with the reason that it is federal law (it actually became law around 1935 - FDR and the coopers and
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 15, 2013
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          not only is he correct that it is federal law and correct with the reason that it is federal law (it actually became law around 1935 - FDR and the coopers and coopers unions) but the Scotch distillers continue to use the use the ex-bourbon barrels (and ex-sherry)...without recharring...don't you think they would use glass, stainless or clay with wood chips if it would give them a better product? The law is actually a labeling law - what can be said on the label about the contents is based on the container and it was based on "imitation" and "adulteration" of spirits and trying to protect the public. Since we are talking about hobby and not commercial distilling, there is no concern for labels. Therefore, the only thing to be concerned with is the resulting spirit. If a clay pot with with wood chips produces that you like, great. But, again, if it would produce a great product the general public likes, the big boys would be doing it (they just couldn't label it whisk(e)y and couldn't but an age statement on it with the existing laws.) So, I don't think the law is outdated, it's just restrictive and inhibits the development of new whisk(e)y products. I think the big boys will seek changes in the future.

          On Oct 15, 2013, at 12:08 AM, RLB <last2blast@...> wrote:

           

          you are correct that its a federal law, but that law is really out dated.  When we can do the same thing just by adding charred wood to a glass jar, stainless steel drum, or a clay pot.


          From: Tom Robins <varocketry@...>
          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 11:47 PM
          Subject: [new_distillers] Jerry McCullough said:

           
          Jerry McCullough said:

          " Think about this "Why do the bourbon distillers only use their charred oak barrels once?" The aging process removes the constituents of the white oak wood that add the flavors to the"


          Wrong.  They do it because it is federal law that was put into place around the time of prohibition to protect the cooperage industry.  Most bourbon barrels are sold to overseas whiskey distillers who use them several times before recyclying (Cleaning and recharring to use them again).

          A new barrel can easily be used 5-6 batches before recycling for hobby users.  The later batches require longer stays in the barrel for similar aging results.




          Slainté
          Rick Wrightson
          e: rick@...

        • Ellen Zachos
          Just back from the Speyside Whiskey Festivel in Dufftown, Scotland, and at the Speyside Cooperage I watched the coopers scrape and re-char ex-bourbon barrels.
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 15, 2013
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            Just back from the Speyside Whiskey Festivel in Dufftown, Scotland, and at the Speyside Cooperage I watched the coopers scrape and re-char ex-bourbon barrels.  After 2-3 uses, when the distillers feel the wood has given up its flavors, they scrape and re-char the barrels to get a few more uses out of it.
             
            On Oct 15, 2013, at 8:42 AM, Rick Wrightson wrote:

             

            not only is he correct that it is federal law and correct with the reason that it is federal law (it actually became law around 1935 - FDR and the coopers and coopers unions) but the Scotch distillers continue to use the use the ex-bourbon barrels (and ex-sherry)...without recharring...don't you think they would use glass, stainless or clay with wood chips if it would give them a better product? The law is actually a labeling law - what can be said on the label about the contents is based on the container and it was based on "imitation" and "adulteration" of spirits and trying to protect the public. Since we are talking about hobby and not commercial distilling, there is no concern for labels. Therefore, the only thing to be concerned with is the resulting spirit. If a clay pot with with wood chips produces that you like, great. But, again, if it would produce a great product the general public likes, the big boys would be doing it (they just couldn't label it whisk(e)y and couldn't but an age statement on it with the existing laws.) So, I don't think the law is outdated, it's just restrictive and inhibits the development of new whisk(e)y products. I think the big boys will seek changes in the future.


            On Oct 15, 2013, at 12:08 AM, RLB <last2blast@...> wrote:

             

            you are correct that its a federal law, but that law is really out dated.  When we can do the same thing just by adding charred wood to a glass jar, stainless steel drum, or a clay pot.


            From: Tom Robins <varocketry@...>
            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, October 14, 2013 11:47 PM
            Subject: [new_distillers] Jerry McCullough said:

             
            Jerry McCullough said:

            " Think about this "Why do the bourbon distillers only use their charred oak barrels once?" The aging process removes the constituents of the white oak wood that add the flavors to the"


            Wrong.  They do it because it is federal law that was put into place around the time of prohibition to protect the cooperage industry.  Most bourbon barrels are sold to overseas whiskey distillers who use them several times before recyclying (Cleaning and recharring to use them again).

            A new barrel can easily be used 5-6 batches before recycling for hobby users.  The later batches require longer stays in the barrel for similar aging results.




            Slainté
            Rick Wrightson
            e: rick@...



          • Zapata Vive
            Now thats interesting. Am I reading you too specifically, or is this only done after several fills of scotch? Meaning they dont rechar the bourbon barrels
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 15, 2013
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              Now thats interesting.  Am I reading you too specifically, or is this only done after several fills of scotch?  Meaning they dont rechar the bourbon barrels fresh from the usa?

            • Ellen Zachos
              Correct, they do not re-char the bourbon barrels fresh from the USA, but only after the barrels have been used to mature a few batches of scotch whiskey.
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 15, 2013
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                Correct, they do not re-char the bourbon barrels fresh from the USA, but only after the barrels have been used to mature a few batches of scotch whiskey.

                On Oct 15, 2013, at 6:23 PM, Zapata Vive wrote:

                 

                Now thats interesting.  Am I reading you too specifically, or is this only done after several fills of scotch?  Meaning they dont rechar the bourbon barrels fresh from the usa?



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