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Re: Range

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  • tgfoitwoods
    Captndan, Ric s right about the ending SG varying depending on what you re fermenting. 0.990 is as low as I ve ever seen, but my favorite scotch ale recipe is
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 2, 2013
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      Captndan,

      Ric's right about the ending SG varying depending on what you're fermenting. 0.990 is as low as I've ever seen, but my favorite scotch ale recipe is done at 1.025 (on purpose) and some molasses (for rum) washes will end way higher than that.

      It may sound crude, but one of the best tools is your tongue; if it's sweet at all, your fermentation stopped for some reason before all the sugar was consumed (a problem).

      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ric Cunningham wrote:
      >
      > basically the ferment is done when the yeast have consumed all the
      > available food source. Depending on the wash composition it could be .990
      > or it could by 1.020. An understanding of you wash is critical to knowing
      > if you are finished or if you have a problem with the ferment. A straight
      > sugar wash could finish at 0.990 but a wheat/rye/barley wash may finish as
      > high as 1.020.
      >
      >
      > On Fri, Aug 2, 2013 at 7:11 PM, captndan78 captndan78@... wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" zymurgybob@
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Captndan,
      > > >
      > > > I'm not sure I understand the question. Could you give us some specifics
      > > > about what you're trying to understand?
      > > >
      > > > If you're asking when in the process you're mashing corn, say, it's
      > > > after cooking to gelatinize, cooling to mashing temperature, and only
      > > > then are the diastatic enzymes introduced for mashing. As far as the
      > > > numbers that I'm guessing are specific gravity values, you'll never,
      > > > ever see .099, and if you end up with 1.12 from a grain mash, you're a
      > > > magician, or at least a genius.
      > > >
      > > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits
      > > Well I'm not a genius just a new guy with a lot of questions. The mash
      > > seems to have stopped fermenting and I would like to know if it ready for
      > > distilling based on specific gravity. Currently it is 1.09. Is this to
      > > high?
      > > >
      > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "captndan78" wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I have been reading about the mash. When is it done? I read .099
      > > > down to 1.12 depending who you read. What is the correct reading?
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > US Navy - 100% on watch
      >
    • captndan78
      Thanks to all. That makes a lot more sense now. ... this ... .099 ... reading?
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 3, 2013
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        Thanks to all. That makes a lot more sense now.
        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" wrote:
        >
        > Captndan,
        >
        > Ric's right about the ending SG varying depending on what you're
        > fermenting. 0.990 is as low as I've ever seen, but my favorite scotch
        > ale recipe is done at 1.025 (on purpose) and some molasses (for rum)
        > washes will end way higher than that.
        >
        > It may sound crude, but one of the best tools is your tongue; if it's
        > sweet at all, your fermentation stopped for some reason before all the
        > sugar was consumed (a problem).
        >
        > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ric Cunningham wrote:
        > >
        > > basically the ferment is done when the yeast have consumed all the
        > > available food source. Depending on the wash composition it could be
        > .990
        > > or it could by 1.020. An understanding of you wash is critical to
        > knowing
        > > if you are finished or if you have a problem with the ferment. A
        > straight
        > > sugar wash could finish at 0.990 but a wheat/rye/barley wash may
        > finish as
        > > high as 1.020.
        > >
        > >
        > > On Fri, Aug 2, 2013 at 7:11 PM, captndan78 captndan78@ wrote:
        > >
        > > > **
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" zymurgybob@
        > > > wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Captndan,
        > > > >
        > > > > I'm not sure I understand the question. Could you give us some
        > specifics
        > > > > about what you're trying to understand?
        > > > >
        > > > > If you're asking when in the process you're mashing corn, say,
        > it's
        > > > > after cooking to gelatinize, cooling to mashing temperature, and
        > only
        > > > > then are the diastatic enzymes introduced for mashing. As far as
        > the
        > > > > numbers that I'm guessing are specific gravity values, you'll
        > never,
        > > > > ever see .099, and if you end up with 1.12 from a grain mash,
        > you're a
        > > > > magician, or at least a genius.
        > > > >
        > > > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits
        > > > Well I'm not a genius just a new guy with a lot of questions. The
        > mash
        > > > seems to have stopped fermenting and I would like to know if it
        > ready for
        > > > distilling based on specific gravity. Currently it is 1.09. Is
        this
        > to
        > > > high?
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "captndan78" wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > I have been reading about the mash. When is it done? I read
        .099
        > > > > down to 1.12 depending who you read. What is the correct
        reading?
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > > US Navy - 100% on watch
        > >
        >
      • gravelier007
        Ok, here goes on something that I tried on a current working all-grain mash of 50% corn / 50% unmalted white wheat. I cooked the ground corn and gelatinized it
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 4, 2013
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          Ok, here goes on something that I tried on a current working all-grain mash of 50% corn / 50% unmalted white wheat.

          I cooked the ground corn and gelatinized it by taking the boil to 200 F and letting it set overnight. In the morning, the temp was at about 130 F. I added a tlb spoon of Alpha Amylase and it instantly fluidized the corn starch to sugar. I then added the ground wheat and let it set for a half hour to gelatinize the wheat starch. I then took the temp up to 152 and held it there for a half hour. I then let it cool naturally and when it was less than 90 F, I mixed it up with my drill and a drywall mud mixer. When well aerated, I added a tlb spoon of Red Star bread machine yeast.

          The action took off pretty well as I ferment on the grain and I have to mix the mash down a couple times a day for the first few days. The OG was 1.058. After 3 days, the SG was 1.022 and appeared stuck. Very little activity. The pH was between 4 and 6, looked inbetween on the litmus paper. I don't have a pH pen. So I figured what the heck. I threw in a tlb spoon of Gluco Amylase (GA). Within about 6 hours, I had a half inch of foam on the top of the mash.

          I was out of town over the weekend, and checked it tonight. The SG is 0.992. The SG was 0.998 after 8 days and 0.992 after 12 days.

          Here's what I figure. The GA does its best work at around pH 5 and room temp. The natural activity of the yeast brings the pH down to about pH 5. By dosing the wort with the GA after 3 days of working, it is likely that I was at optimum for the GA to do its duty. I probably ended up a ABV of about 8.66. It will have to be a few more days before I can run it thru the still. I'll do one last SG before I run it. What do they say about the prood of the pudding?

          I don't profess to have any or all of the answers on how or why this process has worked, but it may be someone's answer to stuck mashing. I intend to try this procedure again on my next corn mash and I'll update on what I find. If someone whats to weigh in on what additional sugars were converted to fermentables with the GA, I would appreciate their insight.

          Cheers,

          G.
        • Adam
          My mash starts at 1.090 and finishes at 0.998. I then wait about 3 to 5 days for it to settle and the run it. Sent from my iPhone
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 5, 2013
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            My mash starts at 1.090 and finishes at 0.998. I then wait about 3 to 5 days for it to settle and the run it. 

            Sent from my iPhone

            On Aug 3, 2013, at 2:11 AM, "captndan78" <captndan78@...> wrote:

             



            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
            >
            > Captndan,
            >
            > I'm not sure I understand the question. Could you give us some specifics
            > about what you're trying to understand?
            >
            > If you're asking when in the process you're mashing corn, say, it's
            > after cooking to gelatinize, cooling to mashing temperature, and only
            > then are the diastatic enzymes introduced for mashing. As far as the
            > numbers that I'm guessing are specific gravity values, you'll never,
            > ever see .099, and if you end up with 1.12 from a grain mash, you're a
            > magician, or at least a genius.
            >
            > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits
            Well I'm not a genius just a new guy with a lot of questions. The mash seems to have stopped fermenting and I would like to know if it ready for distilling based on specific gravity. Currently it is 1.09. Is this to high?
            > <http://www.kelleybarts.com/zymurgy-bob-books/making-fine-spirits/>
            >
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "captndan78" wrote:
            > >
            > > I have been reading about the mash. When is it done? I read .099
            > down to 1.12 depending who you read. What is the correct reading?
            > >
            >

          • gravelier007
            Hey Adam: Would you mind sharing your recipe and your procedure? Thanks, G
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 5, 2013
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              Hey Adam:

              Would you mind sharing your recipe and your procedure?

              Thanks,

              G

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "captndan78" <captndan78@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have been reading about the mash. When is it done? I read .099 down to 1.12 depending who you read. What is the correct reading?
              >
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