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Re: Malting Corn, Drying and Grinding Corn Malt

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  • gravelier007
    ... What color is the mold? If it is blue/green I think it s really bad. This is from my neighbor farmer who throws away large amounts of corn silage if it
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 13, 2013
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck" <warnerphoto@...> wrote:
      >
      > Have you ever followed the Alpha Amylase with Gluco Amylase? Is this not an important second step? I have malted 10 lb. corn which got a considerable amount of mold in the process. Do I ignore the mold and boil it anyway, or how can I prevent the mold from happening in the first place?
      >
      What color is the mold? If it is blue/green I think it's really bad. This is from my neighbor farmer who throws away large amounts of corn silage if it has any blue green mold on it. Makes the cows sick. If it is white, it may actually be wild yeast. This why I mash the ground corn and then use alpha amylase (AA) to convert starch to sugar. See my procedure above.

      I have some gluco, but have not used it as yet. I presently have my fermenters tied up with beer and rum wash. I have had my corn wash ferment down to less than 1.000 while not using gluco, so I am not sure that I really need it in the way that I do my mash. Also, gluco works best at about pH 5 and is designed to work on dextrins. I have heard that using back set as part of the mash will depress the pH. But I am not sure how that will effect the working of the AA. Also, although GA works best at pH 5, will it work slower at higher pH? Also, don't know. All these questions

      Good luck, enjoy

      G.
    • Chuck
      The mold is black. I have only tried to malt twice, and I got black mold both times. Is there a way to prevent it or does it come with the territory?
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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        The mold is black. I have only tried to malt twice, and I got black mold both times. Is there a way to prevent it or does it come with the territory?


        > >
        > > Have you ever followed the Alpha Amylase with Gluco Amylase? Is this not an important second step? I have malted 10 lb. corn which got a considerable amount of mold in the process. Do I ignore the mold and boil it anyway, or how can I prevent the mold from happening in the first place?
        > >
        > What color is the mold? If it is blue/green I think it's really bad.... (trimmed)
      • gravelier007
        Hey Chuck The person who started this thread is Tarvus33991. He is the one with experience in malting corn. I would try to send him a message and ask your
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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          Hey Chuck

          The person who started this thread is Tarvus33991. He is the one with experience in malting corn. I would try to send him a message and ask your question directly. My thought is that any mold is bad mold. But I am not the expert. I would rather grind the corn, cook it to sterilize and gelatinize the starch. And then use enzyme to convert the starch to sugar. Your way just seems like too much work. But who am I to judge.

          Hope you get your answers. Good luck

          G.

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck" <warnerphoto@...> wrote:
          >
          > The mold is black.
        • suborbital@rocketmail.com
          Hi Chuck, I ve managed to make 2 lb batches of corn malt and used that to convert 10 lb of corn (2 lb malt corn + 8 lb corn). Take 2 lb of the corn and immerse
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
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            Hi Chuck,

            I've managed to make 2 lb batches of corn malt and used that to convert 10 lb of corn (2 lb malt corn + 8 lb corn).

            Take 2 lb of the corn and immerse in enough warm water to cover by a couple inches. Let stand for 12 hours. Drain, rinse and re-immerse. Repeat twice more (total of 36 hours). Drain the corn and dump it into a malt roller. It looks like this << http://youtu.be/_-41wQHHi0o >> scaled down to a five gallon bucket. You'll need a timer to start and stop it -- mine runs for 1 minute every 72 minutes. You should see chits within a day and roots equal to the kernel length in 5 to 7 days depending on temperature and humidity. Eventually the rootlets will dry up and turn black if you leave them long enough. Grind with a blender just before you use it.

            HTH

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gravelier007" <bhoren@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hey Chuck
            >
            > The person who started this thread is Tarvus33991. He is the one with experience in malting corn. I would try to send him a message and ask your question directly. My thought is that any mold is bad mold. But I am not the expert. I would rather grind the corn, cook it to sterilize and gelatinize the starch. And then use enzyme to convert the starch to sugar. Your way just seems like too much work. But who am I to judge.
            >
            > Hope you get your answers. Good luck
            >
            > G.
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck" <warnerphoto@> wrote:
            > >
            > > The mold is black.
            >
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