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Re: recipe question

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  • John Foster
    Newbies, Making spirits from grain is a 3 step process:   1) Convert the long carbohydrate molecule that is stored in the grain into sugar, enzymes are
    Message 1 of 4 , May 29, 2013
      Newbies,
      Making spirits from grain is a 3 step process:
        1) Convert the long carbohydrate molecule that is stored in the grain into sugar, enzymes are required for this.  The enzymes can come from either malted grain or directly added from a purchased product.  The enzymes from malted grain are active from 142-152 degrees F.
        2) Convert the sugar into alcohol, yeast is needed for this.  The yeast will die if the temperature is too high (above 80 ? 90 degrees F) or the alcohol content is too high (this depends on the type of yeast)
        3) Increase the alcohol content, your still is needed for this.
       
      Here is my basic procedure:
      1. Make a Mash
        a. Fill boiler with 12 gallons of water.
        b. Add cap full of lactic acid to decrease Ph.
        c. Bring water to a boil
        d. Add 20 lbs of cracked corn from the local farmers Co-Op.
        e. Bring mash to a boil again
        f. Reduce heat to avoid boil over and scorching.
        g. Boil 10 - 15 minutes, used to release the starch in corn into solution.
        h. Turn off heat and allow mash to cool to 155o F, approx 1 hour.
        i. Add 10 lbs of Malted barley, used to convert the starch to sugar. Stir well and insulate the entire boiler. 
        j. Allow to rest for 2 hours, stirring every half hour.  Perform iodine-starch test to determine if conversion is complete, if desired.
        k. Drain wash from boiler into fermenting vessels seperating the spent grain from the liquid.  Throw away the spent grain.
      2. Ferment wash
        a. Allow the liquid to cool to room temperature, usually over night.
        b. Add activated yeast, seal and add air-locks to the fermenter (optional, may cover with cheese cloth).
        c. Wait a minimum of 3 - 4 days until fermentation is complete. The air-locks will stop bubbling.
      3. Distill
       
      There are many variation to this procedure, but this gives you the basics
       
             Chris
    • matt hammond
      I ve heard that one should constitute cracked corn in water before boiling when releasing starch for conversion to prevent miniscule air pockets in the
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 20, 2013

        I've heard that one should constitute cracked corn in water before boiling when releasing starch for conversion to prevent miniscule air pockets in the granules which will in turn make it less likely for bacteria to grow in the wash? Has anyone else read or been told this?

        Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



        From: John Foster <john_foster_in_erie@...>;
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>;
        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: recipe question
        Sent: Wed, May 29, 2013 8:28:18 PM

         

        Newbies,
        Making spirits from grain is a 3 step process:
          1) Convert the long carbohydrate molecule that is stored in the grain into sugar, enzymes are required for this.  The enzymes can come from either malted grain or directly added from a purchased product.  The enzymes from malted grain are active from 142-152 degrees F.
          2) Convert the sugar into alcohol, yeast is needed for this.  The yeast will die if the temperature is too high (above 80 ? 90 degrees F) or the alcohol content is too high (this depends on the type of yeast)
          3) Increase the alcohol content, your still is needed for this.
         
        Here is my basic procedure:
        1. Make a Mash
          a. Fill boiler with 12 gallons of water.
          b. Add cap full of lactic acid to decrease Ph.
          c. Bring water to a boil
          d. Add 20 lbs of cracked corn from the local farmers Co-Op.
          e. Bring mash to a boil again
          f. Reduce heat to avoid boil over and scorching.
          g. Boil 10 - 15 minutes, used to release the starch in corn into solution.
          h. Turn off heat and allow mash to cool to 155o F, approx 1 hour.
          i. Add 10 lbs of Malted barley, used to convert the starch to sugar. Stir well and insulate the entire boiler. 
          j. Allow to rest for 2 hours, stirring every half hour.  Perform iodine-starch test to determine if conversion is complete, if desired.
          k. Drain wash from boiler into fermenting vessels seperating the spent grain from the liquid.  Throw away the spent grain.
        2. Ferment wash
          a. Allow the liquid to cool to room temperature, usually over night.
          b. Add activated yeast, seal and add air-locks to the fermenter (optional, may cover with cheese cloth).
          c. Wait a minimum of 3 - 4 days until fermentation is complete. The air-locks will stop bubbling.
        3. Distill
         
        There are many variation to this procedure, but this gives you the basics
         
               Chris
      • Zapata Vive
        Never heard that, sounds like a silly reasoning. Especially in corn whisky where some bacteria is not only ok, but desireable. In fact I intentionally grow
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 22, 2013

          Never heard that, sounds like a silly reasoning. Especially in corn whisky where some bacteria is not only ok, but desireable.

          In fact I intentionally grow bacteria on a portion of my corn before starting a wash.

          Regardless the mechanism seems flawed. In other hobbies I routinely completely sterilize grain with heat with no concerns about air pockets impeding the process.

          On Nov 21, 2013 2:17 AM, "matt hammond" <matt_hammond2003@...> wrote:
           

          I've heard that one should constitute cracked corn in water before boiling when releasing starch for conversion to prevent miniscule air pockets in the granules which will in turn make it less likely for bacteria to grow in the wash? Has anyone else read or been told this?

          Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



          From: John Foster <john_foster_in_erie@...>;
          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>;
          Subject: [new_distillers] Re: recipe question
          Sent: Wed, May 29, 2013 8:28:18 PM

           

          Newbies,
          Making spirits from grain is a 3 step process:
            1) Convert the long carbohydrate molecule that is stored in the grain into sugar, enzymes are required for this.  The enzymes can come from either malted grain or directly added from a purchased product.  The enzymes from malted grain are active from 142-152 degrees F.
            2) Convert the sugar into alcohol, yeast is needed for this.  The yeast will die if the temperature is too high (above 80 ? 90 degrees F) or the alcohol content is too high (this depends on the type of yeast)
            3) Increase the alcohol content, your still is needed for this.
           
          Here is my basic procedure:
          1. Make a Mash
            a. Fill boiler with 12 gallons of water.
            b. Add cap full of lactic acid to decrease Ph.
            c. Bring water to a boil
            d. Add 20 lbs of cracked corn from the local farmers Co-Op.
            e. Bring mash to a boil again
            f. Reduce heat to avoid boil over and scorching.
            g. Boil 10 - 15 minutes, used to release the starch in corn into solution.
            h. Turn off heat and allow mash to cool to 155o F, approx 1 hour.
            i. Add 10 lbs of Malted barley, used to convert the starch to sugar. Stir well and insulate the entire boiler. 
            j. Allow to rest for 2 hours, stirring every half hour.  Perform iodine-starch test to determine if conversion is complete, if desired.
            k. Drain wash from boiler into fermenting vessels seperating the spent grain from the liquid.  Throw away the spent grain.
          2. Ferment wash
            a. Allow the liquid to cool to room temperature, usually over night.
            b. Add activated yeast, seal and add air-locks to the fermenter (optional, may cover with cheese cloth).
            c. Wait a minimum of 3 - 4 days until fermentation is complete. The air-locks will stop bubbling.
          3. Distill
           
          There are many variation to this procedure, but this gives you the basics
           
                 Chris
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