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Fwd: Hi-tech & Low-tech Cider Equipment

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  • waljaco
    ... Two ideas from the book Real Cidermaking on a Small Scale , M.Pooley & J.Lomax, 1999. 1)Third World Technology. It requires a remarkable amount of
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 5, 2002
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      --- In Distillers@y..., "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
      Two ideas from the book 'Real Cidermaking on a Small Scale', M.Pooley
      & J.Lomax, 1999.
      1)Third World Technology. It requires a remarkable amount of pressure
      to extract even a fraction of the juice from a whole apple. For this
      reason it is necessary to crush the apples first. The easiest and
      cheapest way is to crush quartered apples using a 2 metre length of
      timber approx. 100 -120 mm square or a pole of similar diameter. If
      you want to make this even more efficient, drill laterally through the
      pole 60-80 mm from the top and insert a short length of 25 mm dowel to
      provide a handle on either side. Use the pole to pulverise about a 200
      mm depth of quartered apples in say a food grade plastic bucket.

      2)First World Technology. Molasses syrup is separated from sugar
      crystals using a centrifuge. You could use a centrifuge to extract the
      juice from your apple pulp. No centrifuge, you say?
      "We used the spin cycle of the automatic washing machine, putting the
      apple pulp in a pillow case and producing batches of 20-30 gallons of
      juice without any difficulty. Mind you, we made sure the pipes were
      clear of soap beforehand!" (from above book)

      Wal
      --- End forwarded message ---
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