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Re: [new_distillers] Air locks???

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  • Jason Schnapp
    air locks are not necessary cheese cloth works just fine. Air entered in the mash for the first couple days grows more yeast. After that the yeast feed on the
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 26 12:47 PM
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      air locks are not necessary cheese cloth works just fine. Air entered in the mash for the first couple days grows more yeast. After that the yeast feed on the sugar and do not need to multiply. Yeast does not burn sugar to make more yeast it burns sugar to make alcohol. You should be using a hydrometer to tell when the yeast are done. 



      From: Bob Glicksman <bobg542492@...>
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 1:04 PM
      Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Air locks???

       
      You must use an airlock when fermenting.  Yeast has a complex lifecycle.  When exposed to air (aerobic), yeast burns sugar to make more yeast.  It is good to prepare a "yeast starter" by placing a little year in a small amount of sugar-water solution and keep it stirred well so that the yeast propagates aerobically thousands of times.  This starter solution is then added to your wort.  When fermenting, you need to keep the fermentation vessel relatively full of liquid (free of air, but leave some space at the top for foaming) and fitted with an airlock so that CO2 can escape but air can't get in.  The yeast will use up the dissolved oxygen in the liquid and then go into its anaerobic mode where it turn sugar into alcohol and CO2.  If you don't use an airlock, more oxygen will continue to dissolve and the yeast will use up more sugar to make more yeast and less alcohol.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: et_couldry <et_couldry@...>
      To: new_distillers <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thu, Apr 25, 2013 11:40 pm
      Subject: [new_distillers] Air locks???

       
      Are air locks required? I read on homedistliers.org to use them, but I have heard that your also not soposed to use them cause the oxygen lets the yeast run better? If using the air lock. When it stops bubbling does that mean the mash is done?



    • David Eastham
      I agree just need to keep oxygen out, which a heavier layer of CO2 will do. Keep a cover over just to keep out muck and flies etc.. Dave E
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 26 2:05 PM
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        I agree just need to keep oxygen out, which a heavier layer of CO2 will do. Keep a cover over just to keep out muck and flies etc..

        Dave E

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "local yokel" <stridemiester@...> wrote:
        >
        > I never use a closed system with air locks, just proper temp and a cover to keep a layer of CO2 over wash and critters out, the a hydrometer to tell when the wash is done. My collected distillate amounts are in line with projected calculations. Closed ferementation is much more important in wine making and beer brewing, I suspect many distillers carry over those habits from thier experiences in those hobbies. Nothing wrong with an airlocked ferment, it will work perfectly fine, just not absolutely necessary in my opinion. It is much harder to have airlocked vessels as the size of feremnts increases.
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "et_couldry" <et_couldry@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Are air locks required? I read on homedistliers.org to use them, but I have heard that your also not soposed to use them cause the oxygen lets the yeast run better? If using the air lock. When it stops bubbling does that mean the mash is done?
        > >
        >
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