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RE: [new_distillers] Small-scale cider distillation

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  • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
    ... Interesting that they say that adding sugar to the fruit will increase the probability of hangovers. I wonder what the mechanism for that is, given the
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 3, 2002
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      > 'Domestic Eaux-de-vie'
      > http://www.beveragebusiness.com/art-arch/mmbreed05.html

      Interesting that they say that adding sugar to the fruit will increase the probability of hangovers. I wonder what the mechanism for that is, given the earlier discussions that sugar cant make methanol, and that its the stems/pips etc in the fruit that are likely to be the contributors.

      Tony
    • Mike Nixon
      ... From: Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS) To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2002 8:01 AM Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Small-scale cider
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 3, 2002
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, July 04, 2002 8:01 AM
        Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Small-scale cider distillation



        > 'Domestic Eaux-de-vie'
        >
        http://www.beveragebusiness.com/art-arch/mmbreed05.html

        Interesting that they say that adding sugar to the fruit will increase the probability of hangovers.  I wonder what the mechanism for that is, given the earlier discussions that sugar cant make methanol, and that its the stems/pips etc in the fruit that are likely to be the contributors.
        Tony
         
        Quoting the relevant passage from that website:
        "Rupf said that most Alsatian distillers now add sugar to make their products easier to drink. That also makes them a little more likely to give hangovers"
         
        Would it be that making their products "easier to drink" holds a clue?  If you drink more of a flavored spirit then the chances of ending up with a hangover would seem to be higher than if you drink less.
        Mike

      • Dr. M. Legendre
        On Thu, 4 Jul 2002 08:34:19 +1200 ... I think we may be missing something here. My interpretation is that the sugar is being added to the distilled _product_
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 3, 2002
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          On Thu, 4 Jul 2002 08:34:19 +1200
          "Mike Nixon" <mike@...> wrote:

          > Quoting the relevant passage from that website:
          > "Rupf said that most Alsatian distillers now add sugar to make their
          > products easier to drink. That also makes them a little more likely to
          > give hangovers"
          >
          > Would it be that making their products "easier to drink" holds a clue?
          > If you drink more of a flavored spirit then the chances of ending up
          > with a hangover would seem to be higher than if you drink less.

          I think we may be missing something here. My interpretation is that the
          sugar is being added to the distilled _product_ (as one does with
          extracts) rather than to the mash/must. This might make it 'easier to
          drink'.

          Adding amounts of sugar (as for a liqueur or cordial) to liquor will
          increase the quantity, if not the severity, of the aftereffects. Merry
          Christmas ;)

          -- Dr. M. Legendre
        • ups474@aol.com
          Sugar- added spirit can potentially cause a worse hangover- not because of the sugar itself, but because yeast tends to produce more higher and lower alcohols
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 3, 2002
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            Sugar- added spirit can potentially cause a worse hangover- not because of
            the sugar itself, but because yeast tends to produce more higher and lower
            alcohols when it is fermented in high sugar concentrations- I.e; there is
            less heads/tails/methanol to get rid of in a 10gallon batch of 10%abv, than
            in a five gallon batch of 20%abv. The heavier concentration of sugar causes
            the problem, not the source of fermentables.
          • ups474@aol.com
            Adding sugar to a distilled spirit does make it smoother, but it may mess up the blood glucose levels in acute cases of ethanol poisoning, and therefore,
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 3, 2002
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              Adding sugar to a distilled spirit does make it smoother, but it may mess up
              the blood glucose levels in acute cases of ethanol poisoning, and therefore,
              intensify the hangover.
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