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Re: agave

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  • jsducote
    Dry/powdered agave nectar is widely available and more easily transported than barrels of wort. If you can t find it in your local supermarket, try the asian
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 18, 2013
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      Dry/powdered agave nectar is widely available and more easily transported than barrels of wort. If you can't find it in your local supermarket, try the asian or hispanic markets if you have one near you. It's often labelled as cactus honey. Is it exactly the same? No, of course not, but I imagine it's close enough for experimentation. It's widely used as a honey substitute although it's a lot more fructose than glucose, as opposed to honey, which is about equal parts fruc/gluc (wikipedia). It does have a honey-like flavor to it, so consider that in your recipe. It's more expensive than plain sugar, so I would think it should be used as an ingredient for its taste (pot/low-reflux still) as opposed to its price.

      As for your northern greenhouse, I hope you have several acres and even more patience.
      -j

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB <last2blast@...> wrote:
      >
      > Just read up on agave.  Interesting!  It might be worth it to go down south and mixing barrels of agave wort and bring those barrels north to finish fermenting to distill.  Stirring is good, so that long drive back would keep it will stirred.  I wonder how well they would do in a northern greenhouse?
      >
      > Robert
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Donnie <streetroddonnie@...>
      > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 2:10 PM
      > Subject: [new_distillers] agave
      >
      > eany of you ever use pure agave whater a yeast??
    • ahandyman59
      You re talking about the basis of tequila, right? On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 15:40:55 -0000, jsducote wrote: Dry/powdered agave nectar is widely available and more
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 18, 2013
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        You're talking about the basis of tequila, right?

         

        On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 15:40:55 -0000, "jsducote" <jsducote@...> wrote:

         

        Dry/powdered agave nectar is widely available and more easily transported than barrels of wort. If you can't find it in your local supermarket, try the asian or hispanic markets if you have one near you. It's often labelled as cactus honey. Is it exactly the same? No, of course not, but I imagine it's close enough for experimentation. It's widely used as a honey substitute although it's a lot more fructose than glucose, as opposed to honey, which is about equal parts fruc/gluc (wikipedia). It does have a honey-like flavor to it, so consider that in your recipe. It's more expensive than plain sugar, so I would think it should be used as an ingredient for its taste (pot/low-reflux still) as opposed to its price.

        As for your northern greenhouse, I hope you have several acres and even more patience.
        -j

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
        >
        > Just read up on agave.  Interesting!  It might be worth it to go down south and mixing barrels of agave wort and bring those barrels north to finish fermenting to distill.  Stirring is good, so that long drive back would keep it will stirred.  I wonder how well they would do in a northern greenhouse?
        >
        > Robert
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Donnie
        > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 2:10 PM
        > Subject: [new_distillers] agave
        >
        > eany of you ever use pure agave whater a yeast??


         
        .

         

         

      • RLB
        Yes, I was thinking about experimenting with tequila too. Robert ________________________________ From: rdh2059@reachone.com To:
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 18, 2013
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          Yes, I was thinking about experimenting with tequila too.

          Robert


          From: "rdh2059@..." <rdh2059@...>
          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 2:26 PM
          Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: agave

          You're talking about the basis of tequila, right?
           
          On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 15:40:55 -0000, "jsducote" <jsducote@...> wrote:
           
          Dry/powdered agave nectar is widely available and more easily transported than barrels of wort. If you can't find it in your local supermarket, try the asian or hispanic markets if you have one near you. It's often labelled as cactus honey. Is it exactly the same? No, of course not, but I imagine it's close enough for experimentation. It's widely used as a honey substitute although it's a lot more fructose than glucose, as opposed to honey, which is about equal parts fruc/gluc (wikipedia). It does have a honey-like flavor to it, so consider that in your recipe. It's more expensive than plain sugar, so I would think it should be used as an ingredient for its taste (pot/low-reflux still) as opposed to its price.

          As for your northern greenhouse, I hope you have several acres and even more patience.
          -j

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
          >
          > Just read up on agave.  Interesting!  It might be worth it to go down south and mixing barrels of agave wort and bring those barrels north to finish fermenting to distill.  Stirring is good, so that long drive back would keep it will stirred.  I wonder how well they would do in a northern greenhouse?
          >
          > Robert
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Donnie
          > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 2:10 PM
          > Subject: [new_distillers] agave
          >
          > eany of you ever use pure agave whater a yeast??


           
          .

           
           


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