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Re: [new_distillers] Enzymes

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  • RLB
    Besides barley, I read that mung bean, chick pea, and alfalfa are high in enzymes, so I bet they will add an interesting flavor to wort. Thanks for the info,
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 5, 2013
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      Besides barley, I read that mung bean, chick pea, and alfalfa are high in enzymes, so I bet they will add an interesting flavor to wort.

      Thanks for the info,

      Robert



      From: Fredrick Lee <fredrick@...>
      To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 7:44 PM
      Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Enzymes

       
      You can use a little 6-row barley, (25% should do it fine) or you can use a mix of enzymes made for distillation. Primarily alpha amylase and proteinase are going to do the conversion for you, but you'll need to watch the pH, because conversion is highly dependent on it. If you need a better answer, here's the long version: 





      On Feb 5, 2013, at 6:32 PM, "last2blast" <last2blast@...> wrote:

       
      Does anyone have any idea what enzymes would work best with oats (oatmeal)? I feel oatmeal will be a good place to start before moving on to corn, rye, barley, wheat, and buckwheat.

      Robert



    • Becool Stayslinky
      I use alpha amylase and gluco amylase from Mile High and they have worked fine for me. I use a dose of the alpha during the cook/gelatinization stage which
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 5, 2013
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        I use alpha amylase and gluco amylase from Mile High and they have worked fine for me. I use a dose of the alpha during the cook/gelatinization stage which helps a lot to make the mix stirrable, otherwise you get a solid glop. I follow with another dose of alpha at the recommended temperature, wait period, gluco amylase, more waiting, then it's ready, more or less. There are some ph and temperature adjustments in between stages, but they provide clear instructions for all of it with the enzymes. I mash in pretty thick and add ice blocks at each stage to rapidly cool to the next stage. The enzymes also seem to work significantly better with continuous agitation. I use soft white wheat and grind to nearly a flour-like consistency. I haven't used oats but I might expect them to behave similarly to soft wheat in terms of consistency and starch conversion. Keep the enzymes refrigerated and mix them with a small amount of warm water before adding to the mash because they will clump up if you just put them into the mash. My batches are 10 gallons water, 20 pounds wheat, and the enzyme dose is only 9 grams each, with an extra 9 grams of alpha for the pre-dose during the cooking/gelatinization stage. A pound of enzyme will last a long time.

        Does anyone have a preference for liquid over powdered enzymes? I would consider liquid if I knew of a good source for hobby sized quantities.

        BC

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "last2blast" wrote:
        >
        > Does anyone have any idea what enzymes would work best with oats (oatmeal)? I feel oatmeal will be a good place to start before moving on to corn, rye, barley, wheat, and buckwheat.
        >
        > Robert
        >
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