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leak sealing

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  • Ricky R.
    I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how
    Message 1 of 22 , Feb 2, 2013
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      I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...
    • RLB
      I personally like soldered on (threaded) brass fitting that can be hand tightened, but that s just me.  Too me, loosing alcohol vapor is bad because it has
      Message 2 of 22 , Feb 2, 2013
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        I personally like soldered on (threaded) brass fitting that can be hand tightened, but that's just me.  Too me, loosing alcohol vapor is bad because it has the potential to blow up and out.  Remember, we are dealing with pressurizes hot vapors and liquid.

        So be careful and safety first,

        Robert



        From: Ricky R. <rrogers10@...>
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2013 2:25 PM
        Subject: [new_distillers] leak sealing

         
        I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...



      • Blackhat-Whitedog
        Message 3 of 22 , Feb 3, 2013
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          --- On Sat, 2/2/13, Ricky R. <rrogers10@...> wrote:

          > From: Ricky R. <rrogers10@...>
          > Subject: [new_distillers] leak sealing
          > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Saturday, February 2, 2013, 11:25 AM
          > I know to seal leaks I can use a
          > flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used
          > some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it
          > was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so
          > aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
          > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around
          > thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post
          > pics asap....thanks...
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > New Distillers group archives are at http://www.taet.com.au/distillers.nsf/
          > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >     new_distillers-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
        • mtj2854
          I ve got a 2 bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It s a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it
          Message 4 of 22 , Feb 3, 2013
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            I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
            >
            > I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...
            >
          • Ricky R.
            I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the joints and think they used
            Message 5 of 22 , Feb 4, 2013
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              I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand lol
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: mtj2854
              Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
              Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

               

              I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
              >
              > I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...
              >

              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13

              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13

            • RLB
              At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
              Message 6 of 22 , Feb 4, 2013
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                At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.

                Robert



                From: Ricky R. <rrogers10@...>
                To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                 
                I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand lol
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: mtj2854
                Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                 
                I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                >
                > I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...
                >

                No virus found in this message.
                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                No virus found in this message.
                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13


              • mtj2854
                The rubber melts at 750F. The 2 copper pipe fits snugly and about 2 deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection
                Message 7 of 22 , Feb 4, 2013
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                  The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]

                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                  >
                  > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                  >
                  > Robert
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: Ricky R.
                  > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                  > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                  >
                  >
                  >  
                  > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                  > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                  > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                  > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                  > lol
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > >From: mtj2854
                  > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                  > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                  > >
                  > > 
                  > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                  > >
                  > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                  > >>
                  > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                  > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                  > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                  > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                  > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                  > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                  > asap....thanks...
                  > >>
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >No virus found in this message.
                  > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                  > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                  > No virus found in this message.
                  > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                  >
                • ahandyman59
                  Apparently Butyl Rubber (the same material in inner tubes) is used in gloves that are highly resistant to ethanol. Getting the exact melting point of butyl
                  Message 8 of 22 , Feb 4, 2013
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                    Apparently Butyl Rubber (the same material in inner tubes) is used in gloves that are highly resistant to ethanol. Getting the exact melting point of butyl rubber is difficult, because with additives, it can be made to melt as low as 90 degrees centigrade. The fully cured stuff like inner tubes is much higher, around 200 degrees centigrade. You may be on to something, but I think I’ll stick with flour paste…;-)

                     

                    Ahandyman59

                     

                    From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of RLB
                    Sent: Monday, February 04, 2013 12:34 PM
                    To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                     

                     

                    At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.

                    Robert

                     

                     


                    From: Ricky R. <rrogers10@...>
                    To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                    Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                     

                     

                    I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand lol

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    From: mtj2854

                    Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM

                    Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                     

                     

                    I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]

                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                    >
                    > I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...
                    >

                    No virus found in this message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13

                    No virus found in this message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13

                     

                  • chris
                    The way I understand it is that there should NOT be any pressure in your still.
                    Message 9 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
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                      The way I understand it is that there should NOT be any pressure in your still.

                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mtj2854" wrote:
                      >
                      > The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]
                      >
                      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                      > >
                      > > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                      > >
                      > > Robert
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > > From: Ricky R.
                      > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                      > > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >  
                      > > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                      > > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                      > > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                      > > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                      > > lol
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > >From: mtj2854
                      > > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      > > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                      > > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                      > > >
                      > > > 
                      > > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                      > > >
                      > > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                      > > >>
                      > > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                      > > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                      > > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                      > > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                      > > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                      > > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                      > > asap....thanks...
                      > > >>
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >No virus found in this message.
                      > > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                      > > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                      > > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                      > > No virus found in this message.
                      > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                      > > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                      > >
                      >
                    • michael raphael
                      If it leaks out, it leaks in.  Doesn t matter where the pressure is.  Common physics. ________________________________ From: mtj2854 To:
                      Message 10 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
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                        If it leaks out, it leaks in.  Doesn't matter where the pressure is.  Common physics.


                        From: mtj2854 <mtj2854@...>
                        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 8:53 PM
                        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                         
                        The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]

                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                        >
                        > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                        >
                        > Robert
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: Ricky R.
                        > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                        > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                        >
                        >
                        >  
                        > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                        > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                        > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                        > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                        > lol
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > >From: mtj2854
                        > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                        > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                        > >
                        > > 
                        > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                        > >
                        > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                        > >>
                        > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                        > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                        > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                        > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                        > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                        > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                        > asap....thanks...
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >No virus found in this message.
                        > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                        > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                        > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                        > No virus found in this message.
                        > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                        > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                        >



                      • RLB
                        My concern with rubber is petroleum based chemicals entering your still via vapor and contaminating your stripping run, thumper tank, and/or worm.  You do
                        Message 11 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
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                          My concern with rubber is petroleum based chemicals entering your still via vapor and contaminating your stripping run, thumper tank, and/or worm.  You do realize that oil based products are separated by using a reflux still like setup.  If you heat rubber, oil is a by-product.  Just concerned about using rubber anywhere around a still.  Beside rubber, petroleum, and ethanol are flammable.

                          Robert



                          From: michael raphael <mikeraphael2000@...>
                          To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 11:34 AM
                          Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                           
                          If it leaks out, it leaks in.  Doesn't matter where the pressure is.  Common physics.


                          From: mtj2854 <mtj2854@...>
                          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 8:53 PM
                          Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                           
                          The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]

                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                          >
                          > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                          >
                          > Robert
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: Ricky R.
                          > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                          > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                          > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                          > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                          > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                          > lol
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > >From: mtj2854
                          > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                          > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                          > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                          > >
                          > > 
                          > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                          > >
                          > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                          > >>
                          > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                          > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                          > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                          > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                          > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                          > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                          > asap....thanks...
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >No virus found in this message.
                          > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                          > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                          > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                          > No virus found in this message.
                          > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                          > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                          >





                        • Fredrick Lee
                          Unless its a laminar leak.... ... Unless its a laminar leak.... On Feb 5, 2013, at 11:34 AM, michael raphael wrote: If it leaks
                          Message 12 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
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                            Unless its a laminar leak....

                            On Feb 5, 2013, at 11:34 AM, michael raphael <mikeraphael2000@...> wrote:

                             

                            If it leaks out, it leaks in.  Doesn't matter where the pressure is.  Common physics.


                            From: mtj2854 <mtj2854@...>
                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 8:53 PM
                            Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                             
                            The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]

                            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                            >
                            > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                            >
                            > Robert
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > ________________________________
                            > From: Ricky R.
                            > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                            > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                            >
                            >
                            >  
                            > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                            > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                            > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                            > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                            > lol
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > >From: mtj2854
                            > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                            > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                            > >
                            > > 
                            > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                            > >
                            > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                            > >>
                            > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                            > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                            > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                            > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                            > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                            > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                            > asap....thanks...
                            > >>
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >No virus found in this message.
                            > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                            > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                            > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                            > No virus found in this message.
                            > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                            > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                            >



                          • michael raphael
                            In which case it would be intended....  If you were moving a hydroscopic fluid/gas and it leaked to atmosphere, moisture would enter your process.
                            Message 13 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
                            • 0 Attachment
                              In which case it would be intended....  If you were moving a hydroscopic fluid/gas and it leaked to atmosphere, moisture would enter your process. I don't believe you would find either case in ethanol distillation....


                              From: Fredrick Lee <fredrick@...>
                              To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                              Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 11:43 AM
                              Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                               
                              Unless its a laminar leak....

                              On Feb 5, 2013, at 11:34 AM, michael raphael <mikeraphael2000@...> wrote:

                               
                              If it leaks out, it leaks in.  Doesn't matter where the pressure is.  Common physics.


                              From: mtj2854 <mtj2854@...>
                              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 8:53 PM
                              Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                               
                              The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]

                              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                              >
                              > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                              >
                              > Robert
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > ________________________________
                              > From: Ricky R.
                              > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                              > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                              >
                              >
                              >  
                              > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                              > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                              > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                              > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                              > lol
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > >From: mtj2854
                              > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                              > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                              > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                              > >
                              > > 
                              > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                              > >
                              > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                              > >>
                              > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                              > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                              > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                              > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                              > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                              > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                              > asap....thanks...
                              > >>
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >No virus found in this message.
                              > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                              > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                              > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                              > No virus found in this message.
                              > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                              > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                              >





                            • RLB
                              The surface area of my pot is around 63.68 sq., and my condenser opening is around 0.78 sq.  For this reason steam and ethanol vapor is pushed through
                              Message 14 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                The surface area of my pot is around 63.68" sq., and my condenser opening is around 0.78"sq.  For this reason steam and ethanol vapor is pushed through condenser somehow, aka: pressure.  Its downward slope it would create even more pressure within its cap head.  Granted that pressure is not extremely high, but pressure is pressure.  If a person used a thumper with their pot still, there could be a great deal of pressure build up inside because it would be the only way to push pot still vapors into a thumper.  Using a worm would also cause pressure within a pot still.  Safety first.

                                Robert


                                From: chris <gonagin58@...>
                                To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 10:06 AM
                                Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                                 
                                The way I understand it is that there should NOT be any pressure in your still.

                                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mtj2854" wrote:
                                >
                                > The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]
                                >
                                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                                > >
                                > > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                                > >
                                > > Robert
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > ________________________________
                                > > From: Ricky R.
                                > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                > > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                                > > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >  
                                > > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                                > > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                                > > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                                > > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                                > > lol
                                > > ----- Original Message -----
                                > > >From: mtj2854
                                > > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                > > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                                > > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                                > > >
                                > > > 
                                > > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                                > > >
                                > > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                                > > >>
                                > > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                                > > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                                > > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                                > > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                                > > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                                > > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                                > > asap....thanks...
                                > > >>
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >No virus found in this message.
                                > > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                > > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                                > > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                                > > No virus found in this message.
                                > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                > > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                                > >
                                >



                              • Fredrick Lee
                                Agree completely. ... Agree completely. On Feb 5, 2013, at 1:47 PM, michael raphael wrote: In which case it would be intended....
                                Message 15 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Agree completely. 



                                  On Feb 5, 2013, at 1:47 PM, michael raphael <mikeraphael2000@...> wrote:

                                   

                                  In which case it would be intended....  If you were moving a hydroscopic fluid/gas and it leaked to atmosphere, moisture would enter your process. I don't believe you would find either case in ethanol distillation....


                                  From: Fredrick Lee <fredrick@...>
                                  To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 11:43 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                                   
                                  Unless its a laminar leak....

                                  On Feb 5, 2013, at 11:34 AM, michael raphael <mikeraphael2000@...> wrote:

                                   
                                  If it leaks out, it leaks in.  Doesn't matter where the pressure is.  Common physics.


                                  From: mtj2854 <mtj2854@...>
                                  To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 8:53 PM
                                  Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                                   
                                  The rubber melts at 750F. The 2" copper pipe fits snugly and about 2" deep into the copper coupling. Pressure in the still will try to escape OUT the conection so I fail to see how it could ever be in contact with the product. [Rainier distillers has been around for years, and he uses it]

                                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, RLB wrote:
                                  >
                                  > At what temp does rubber melt, and at what temp is the oil based chemicals in rubber released?  Rubber is an idea, but not a good one if it poisons you.
                                  >
                                  > Robert
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ________________________________
                                  > From: Ricky R.
                                  > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:50 AM
                                  > Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  > I have actually saw that before,as a kid and on
                                  > much bigger scale,my father used part of a car tube that they wrapped around the
                                  > joints and think they used bailing twine to hold it in place or whatever was on
                                  > hand..I'm thinking of doing the same with a old bike tube I have on hand
                                  > lol
                                  > ----- Original Message -----
                                  > >From: mtj2854
                                  > >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                  > >Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:40 PM
                                  > >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                                  > >
                                  > > 
                                  > >I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]
                                  > >
                                  > >--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                                  > >>
                                  > >> I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and
                                  > water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the
                                  > connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in
                                  > the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw
                                  > teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe
                                  > around main or lyme arm...will post pics
                                  > asap....thanks...
                                  > >>
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >No virus found in this message.
                                  > >Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                  > >Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus
                                  > Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                                  > No virus found in this message.
                                  > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                                  > Version: 2013.0.2897 / Virus Database: 2639/6075 - Release Date: 02/01/13
                                  >





                                • o1bigtenor
                                  ... wee bit closer to the year 2000 usage? Darald On Mon, Feb 4, 2013 at 11:07 PM, ahandyman59 wrote: Apparently Butyl Rubber (the
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Feb 5, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    On Mon, Feb 4, 2013 at 11:07 PM, ahandyman59 <rdh2059@...> wrote:


                                    Apparently Butyl Rubber (the same material in inner tubes) is used in gloves that are highly resistant to ethanol. Getting the exact melting point of butyl rubber is difficult, because with additives, it can be made to melt as low as 90 degrees centigrade. The fully cured stuff like inner tubes is much higher, around 200 degrees centigrade. You may be on to something, but I think I’ll stick with flour paste…;-)

                                     


                                    Please - - centigrade as a unit was dead in 1948 - - could we please get a wee bit closer to the year 2000 usage?

                                    Darald

                                  • Nicodeamous
                                    If the connections are fairly snug, use teflon tape to seal the gap. If the the connection is so loose that you need a rubber seal, two rubber grades i
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Feb 7, 2013
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      If the connections are fairly snug, use teflon tape to seal the gap.

                                      If the the connection is so loose that you need a rubber seal, two rubber grades i recommend are Silicone and EPDM.

                                      The pros of Silicone is that it has excellent heat resistance and are not commonly compounded using sulfur, oil and additives.

                                      The cons of silicone is that they can be more fragile than other rubbers and are not especially resistant to ethanol(it may swell a bit, flourosilicone would be better in this respect). Also, some are cured with peroxides that can be a bit 'smelly' when new.

                                      Look for seals that are platimum cured and/or are translucent, ( such as many medical grade seals)if you want the 'cleanest' seals.

                                      The pros of EPDM is that it is resistant to both water and ethanol, is tougher than silicone, cheaper and generally more common.

                                      The cons are that EPDM is often compounded with oils, waxes, sulfur and other additives which can be extracted from the rubber while in contact with the hot vapors of the still.

                                      Look for seals that are NSF & UL approved for use with potable water.

                                      With all seals, wash them thoroughly and 'bake' them in an oven for an hour or three at 250'F (best to suspend from your baking rack with a thin wire) before use.

                                      This will cause many of the additives & oils that may be lurking inside to come out and will not hurt the rubber.

                                      You can get an idea of the quality of the seal this way. Cheaper seals will generate more smoke than better quality seals. Many will actually shrink a bit.

                                      The other option is to make some kind of mold and use an RTV (Room temperature vulcanization) silicone to make the seal. This may be the best option if it is especially large or oddly shaped.

                                      Nico
                                    • White Bear
                                          The other option is to make some kind of mold and use an RTV (Room temperature vulcanization) silicone to make the seal. This may be the best option if
                                      Message 18 of 22 , Feb 7, 2013
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                         
                                         
                                        "The other option is to make some kind of mold and use an RTV (Room temperature vulcanization) silicone to make the seal. This may be the best option if it is especially large or oddly shaped."
                                         
                                        This is what I use for my gaskets although you have to be careful with the amount of pressure you use to tighten the fittings so as not to crush the gasket.  As an added insurence I wrap the joint with a vulcanized rubber product made for leaky pipes.  I am sorry but I don't remember the name of it but it comes in a roll and is a bit sticky so it readily stickes to itself.  Use this to wrap around the outside of the joint.  You don't need much as it stretches quite a lot.
                                        White Bear
                                         
                                         

                                        From: Nicodeamous <nicodeamous@...>
                                        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                        Sent: Thursday, February 7, 2013 9:11 AM
                                        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                                         
                                        If the connections are fairly snug, use teflon tape to seal the gap.

                                        If the the connection is so loose that you need a rubber seal, two rubber grades i recommend are Silicone and EPDM.

                                        The pros of Silicone is that it has excellent heat resistance and are not commonly compounded using sulfur, oil and additives.

                                        The cons of silicone is that they can be more fragile than other rubbers and are not especially resistant to ethanol(it may swell a bit, flourosilicone would be better in this respect). Also, some are cured with peroxides that can be a bit 'smelly' when new.

                                        Look for seals that are platimum cured and/or are translucent, ( such as many medical grade seals)if you want the 'cleanest' seals.

                                        The pros of EPDM is that it is resistant to both water and ethanol, is tougher than silicone, cheaper and generally more common.

                                        The cons are that EPDM is often compounded with oils, waxes, sulfur and other additives which can be extracted from the rubber while in contact with the hot vapors of the still.

                                        Look for seals that are NSF & UL approved for use with potable water.

                                        With all seals, wash them thoroughly and 'bake' them in an oven for an hour or three at 250'F (best to suspend from your baking rack with a thin wire) before use.

                                        This will cause many of the additives & oils that may be lurking inside to come out and will not hurt the rubber.

                                        You can get an idea of the quality of the seal this way. Cheaper seals will generate more smoke than better quality seals. Many will actually shrink a bit.

                                        The other option is to make some kind of mold and use an RTV (Room temperature vulcanization) silicone to make the seal. This may be the best option if it is especially large or oddly shaped.

                                        Nico

                                      • RLB
                                        All these idea are nice, but they are still not better than threads for small pipes.  I love the metal belt that holds my cap to its pot. Robert
                                        Message 19 of 22 , Feb 7, 2013
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          All these idea are nice, but they are still not better than threads for small pipes.  I love the metal belt that holds my cap to its pot.

                                          Robert



                                          From: White Bear <sha_man_1@...>
                                          To: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
                                          Sent: Thursday, February 7, 2013 2:13 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                                           
                                           
                                           
                                          "The other option is to make some kind of mold and use an RTV (Room temperature vulcanization) silicone to make the seal. This may be the best option if it is especially large or oddly shaped."
                                           
                                          This is what I use for my gaskets although you have to be careful with the amount of pressure you use to tighten the fittings so as not to crush the gasket.  As an added insurence I wrap the joint with a vulcanized rubber product made for leaky pipes.  I am sorry but I don't remember the name of it but it comes in a roll and is a bit sticky so it readily stickes to itself.  Use this to wrap around the outside of the joint.  You don't need much as it stretches quite a lot.
                                          White Bear
                                           
                                           

                                          From: Nicodeamous <nicodeamous@...>
                                          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                          Sent: Thursday, February 7, 2013 9:11 AM
                                          Subject: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing
                                           
                                          If the connections are fairly snug, use teflon tape to seal the gap.

                                          If the the connection is so loose that you need a rubber seal, two rubber grades i recommend are Silicone and EPDM.

                                          The pros of Silicone is that it has excellent heat resistance and are not commonly compounded using sulfur, oil and additives.

                                          The cons of silicone is that they can be more fragile than other rubbers and are not especially resistant to ethanol(it may swell a bit, flourosilicone would be better in this respect). Also, some are cured with peroxides that can be a bit 'smelly' when new.

                                          Look for seals that are platimum cured and/or are translucent, ( such as many medical grade seals)if you want the 'cleanest' seals.

                                          The pros of EPDM is that it is resistant to both water and ethanol, is tougher than silicone, cheaper and generally more common.

                                          The cons are that EPDM is often compounded with oils, waxes, sulfur and other additives which can be extracted from the rubber while in contact with the hot vapors of the still.

                                          Look for seals that are NSF & UL approved for use with potable water.

                                          With all seals, wash them thoroughly and 'bake' them in an oven for an hour or three at 250'F (best to suspend from your baking rack with a thin wire) before use.

                                          This will cause many of the additives & oils that may be lurking inside to come out and will not hurt the rubber.

                                          You can get an idea of the quality of the seal this way. Cheaper seals will generate more smoke than better quality seals. Many will actually shrink a bit.

                                          The other option is to make some kind of mold and use an RTV (Room temperature vulcanization) silicone to make the seal. This may be the best option if it is especially large or oddly shaped.

                                          Nico



                                        • Jim Wannaknow
                                          gee what ever happened to good ole flour paste?
                                          Message 20 of 22 , Feb 7, 2013
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            gee what ever happened to good ole flour paste?

                                            On Thu, Feb 7, 2013 at 9:11 AM, Nicodeamous <nicodeamous@...> wrote:
                                             

                                            If the connections are fairly snug, use teflon tape to seal the gap.

                                            If the the connection is so loose that you need a rubber seal, two rubber grades i recommend are Silicone and EPDM.

                                            The pros of Silicone is that it has excellent heat resistance and are not commonly compounded using sulfur, oil and additives.

                                            The cons of silicone is that they can be more fragile than other rubbers and are not especially resistant to ethanol(it may swell a bit, flourosilicone would be better in this respect). Also, some are cured with peroxides that can be a bit 'smelly' when new.

                                            Look for seals that are platimum cured and/or are translucent, ( such as many medical grade seals)if you want the 'cleanest' seals.

                                            The pros of EPDM is that it is resistant to both water and ethanol, is tougher than silicone, cheaper and generally more common.

                                            The cons are that EPDM is often compounded with oils, waxes, sulfur and other additives which can be extracted from the rubber while in contact with the hot vapors of the still.

                                            Look for seals that are NSF & UL approved for use with potable water.

                                            With all seals, wash them thoroughly and 'bake' them in an oven for an hour or three at 250'F (best to suspend from your baking rack with a thin wire) before use.

                                            This will cause many of the additives & oils that may be lurking inside to come out and will not hurt the rubber.

                                            You can get an idea of the quality of the seal this way. Cheaper seals will generate more smoke than better quality seals. Many will actually shrink a bit.

                                            The other option is to make some kind of mold and use an RTV (Room temperature vulcanization) silicone to make the seal. This may be the best option if it is especially large or oddly shaped.

                                            Nico


                                          • Carlos alberto Sanchez
                                            yo soy un verdadero milagro de la vida ________________________________ De: mtj2854 Para: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Enviado: domingo,
                                            Message 21 of 22 , Feb 8, 2013
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              yo soy un verdadero milagro de la vida


                                              De: mtj2854 <mtj2854@...>
                                              Para: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                              Enviado: domingo, 3 de febrero de 2013 22:40
                                              Asunto: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                                               
                                              I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]

                                              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                                              >
                                              > I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...
                                              >



                                            • Carlos alberto Sanchez
                                              YO SOY UN VERDADERO MILAGRO DE LA VIDA ________________________________ De: Carlos alberto Sanchez Para:
                                              Message 22 of 22 , Feb 20, 2013
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                YO SOY UN VERDADERO MILAGRO DE LA VIDA


                                                De: Carlos alberto Sanchez <s_carlosalberto@...>
                                                Para: "new_distillers@yahoogroups.com" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>; AA-24heures-partages Modérateur <AA-24heures-partages-proprietaire@...>
                                                Enviado: sábado, 9 de febrero de 2013 1:16
                                                Asunto: Re: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                                                 
                                                yo soy un verdadero milagro de la vida


                                                De: mtj2854 <mtj2854@...>
                                                Para: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                                Enviado: domingo, 3 de febrero de 2013 22:40
                                                Asunto: [new_distillers] Re: leak sealing

                                                 
                                                I've got a 2" bocobob and where the tubes insert I use pieces of bicycle inertube. It's a bitch to stretch into place but after its there you can fold/roll it back to disassemble. I've never had a leak. [I use about 4" sections of inertube]

                                                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ricky R." wrote:
                                                >
                                                > I know to seal leaks I can use a flour and water mix but I saw a few pot stills that used some kinda wrap on the connections,just wondering what it was and how well it worked..mine will be in the house so aside from permanent soldering what can I use...think I saw teflon tape wont hold,have 2 brass connections,around thermometer,and maybe around main or lyme arm...will post pics asap....thanks...
                                                >





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