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Temp

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  • skub13
    Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast because im down under it gets a little too hot. i know when in the fermenting process the
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 20, 2012
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      Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast because im down under it gets a little too hot.
      i know when in the fermenting process the recommended temp is 21 degrees Celsius.
      and if it gets to cold (i dont know the temp reading for this) the process stops.
      but what happens when it gets to hot and at what temp does it roughly happen at.

      please and thank you
    • blscarter
      Hi Chris i have been told that it is 39 degrees & then the yeast dies. you can still cook it it off as normal but the quantity will be less. try putting your
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 28, 2012
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        Hi Chris

        i have been told that it is 39 degrees & then the yeast dies. you can still cook it it off as normal but the quantity will be less. try putting your fermenter in a tub of water & add freezer blocks to it to keep the temp down. that is what i have done with my wash as i am down under too. hope this helps.

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "skub13" <chris2pher13@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast because im down under it gets a little too hot.
        > i know when in the fermenting process the recommended temp is 21 degrees Celsius.
        > and if it gets to cold (i dont know the temp reading for this) the process stops.
        > but what happens when it gets to hot and at what temp does it roughly happen at.
        >
        > please and thank you
        >
      • Er. Prashant Jha
        Skub Yeast works at its optimum temperature. When temperature rises the activity of yeast gets suppressed and it stops working. Moreover the vitality and
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 31, 2012
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          Skub


          Yeast works at its optimum temperature. When temperature rises the activity of yeast gets suppressed and it stops working. Moreover the vitality and viabilty of yeast also gets suppressed. Just imagine yourself doing some work in 50 degree celcius ambient temperature i m sure you will not do any work in such temperature and you will like to sit down and take rest at your home. similar way at high temperature yeast like to take rest in their wash(their home).


          Jai ho
        • Er. Prashant Jha
          You are totally wrong on the point that yeast optimum temperature is 39 degree. The optimum working temp for yeast (sachharomyces cerevisiea) is 31-33 degree.
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 31, 2012
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            You are totally wrong on the point that yeast optimum temperature is
            39 degree. The optimum working temp for yeast (sachharomyces
            cerevisiea) is 31-33 degree. When temp of mash increases above 33
            degree the yeast viability falls drastically. As yeast are not
            thermotolerant that is they withstand high temp therefore it starts
            dying. Below 30 degree celcius the yeast becomes dormant that is their
            action stops. If yeast dies after completion of fermentation than
            there is no issue as it is said that died yeast also add flavor to the
            product. However if you want to seperate dead yeast then you either
            have to centrifuge the beer or have to filter it.

            On 12/29/12, blscarter <blscarter@...> wrote:
            > Hi Chris
            >
            > i have been told that it is 39 degrees & then the yeast dies. you can still
            > cook it it off as normal but the quantity will be less. try putting your
            > fermenter in a tub of water & add freezer blocks to it to keep the temp
            > down. that is what i have done with my wash as i am down under too. hope
            > this helps.
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "skub13" <chris2pher13@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast
            >> because im down under it gets a little too hot.
            >> i know when in the fermenting process the recommended temp is 21 degrees
            >> Celsius.
            >> and if it gets to cold (i dont know the temp reading for this) the process
            >> stops.
            >> but what happens when it gets to hot and at what temp does it roughly
            >> happen at.
            >>
            >> please and thank you
            >>
            >
            >
            >


            --
            Er. Prashant Jha
            Asst. Engineer
            Sri Renuka Sugars Limited
          • Fredrick Lee
            Above 21°C the yeast will create more complex alcohols, esters, aromatics and phenolic compounds. Above 25°C they taste downright awful. Above 30°C some
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 31, 2012
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              Above 21°C the yeast will create more complex alcohols, esters, aromatics and phenolic compounds. Above 25°C they taste downright awful. Above 30°C some start dying, but most start dying around 48°C. 



              On Dec 21, 2012, at 12:51 AM, "skub13" <chris2pher13@...> wrote:

               

              Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast because im down under it gets a little too hot.
              i know when in the fermenting process the recommended temp is 21 degrees Celsius.
              and if it gets to cold (i dont know the temp reading for this) the process stops.
              but what happens when it gets to hot and at what temp does it roughly happen at.

              please and thank you

            • Chris Riddiford
              Okay fair enough but this raises a rather annoying question. For the second time in a row my fermeting process hasn t really happened, I ve chucked in my
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 1, 2013
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                Okay fair enough but this raises a rather annoying question. For the second time in a row my fermeting process hasn't really happened, I've chucked in my dextros and carbon packs to boilling water then waitted till the temp was 21-24 degress before adding my turbo yeast.

                It just seems to foam up and nothing else.

                On Jan 2, 2013 6:00 AM, "Er. Prashant Jha" <prashant771@...> wrote:
                 

                You are totally wrong on the point that yeast optimum temperature is
                39 degree. The optimum working temp for yeast (sachharomyces
                cerevisiea) is 31-33 degree. When temp of mash increases above 33
                degree the yeast viability falls drastically. As yeast are not
                thermotolerant that is they withstand high temp therefore it starts
                dying. Below 30 degree celcius the yeast becomes dormant that is their
                action stops. If yeast dies after completion of fermentation than
                there is no issue as it is said that died yeast also add flavor to the
                product. However if you want to seperate dead yeast then you either
                have to centrifuge the beer or have to filter it.

                On 12/29/12, blscarter <blscarter@...> wrote:
                > Hi Chris
                >
                > i have been told that it is 39 degrees & then the yeast dies. you can still
                > cook it it off as normal but the quantity will be less. try putting your
                > fermenter in a tub of water & add freezer blocks to it to keep the temp
                > down. that is what i have done with my wash as i am down under too. hope
                > this helps.
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "skub13" <chris2pher13@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast
                >> because im down under it gets a little too hot.
                >> i know when in the fermenting process the recommended temp is 21 degrees
                >> Celsius.
                >> and if it gets to cold (i dont know the temp reading for this) the process
                >> stops.
                >> but what happens when it gets to hot and at what temp does it roughly
                >> happen at.
                >>
                >> please and thank you
                >>
                >
                >
                >

                --
                Er. Prashant Jha
                Asst. Engineer
                Sri Renuka Sugars Limited

              • fatbloke
                Any suggestion of fermenting in the 30 s tells me that you haven t done much home brewing of any type..... It depends on what is being fermented, but even this
                Message 7 of 13 , Jan 1, 2013
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                  Any suggestion of fermenting in the 30's tells me that you haven't done much home brewing of any type.....

                  It depends on what is being fermented, but even this years "reds", using a professional yeast (BDX) seemed to perform best at about 26C.

                  Of course theres other yeast that have very wide temp tolerances, a good example being Lallemand/Lalvin K1-V1116 (listed as being capable of fermenting between about 10 and 35c max. With best results in the high teens to low 20s.

                  So it's not such a good idea to push the numbers unless you really want high levels of fusels coming through.

                  Even standard "brewing belts" are fixed at 24c which is plenty of warmth for the yeast, unless you're aiming to use one of the less temp tolerant wine yeasts on some special grapes.

                  Turbos and sugar wash also appear to work best at the high teens/low 20s too. Equally I wouldnt push them to any theoretical limit either.

                  Pip pip!

                  "Er. Prashant Jha" <prashant771@...> wrote:
                   

                  You are totally wrong on the point that yeast optimum temperature is
                  39 degree. The optimum working temp for yeast (sachharomyces
                  cerevisiea) is 31-33 degree. When temp of mash increases above 33
                  degree the yeast viability falls drastically. As yeast are not
                  thermotolerant that is they withstand high temp therefore it starts
                  dying. Below 30 degree celcius the yeast becomes dormant that is their
                  action stops. If yeast dies after completion of fermentation than
                  there is no issue as it is said that died yeast also add flavor to the
                  product. However if you want to seperate dead yeast then you either
                  have to centrifuge the beer or have to filter it.

                  On 12/29/12, blscarter <blscarter@...> wrote:
                  > Hi Chris
                  >
                  > i have been told that it is 39 degrees & then the yeast dies. you can still
                  > cook it it off as normal but the quantity will be less. try putting your
                  > fermenter in a tub of water & add freezer blocks to it to keep the temp
                  > down. that is what i have done with my wash as i am down under too. hope
                  > this helps.
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "skub13" <chris2pher13@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast
                  >> because im down under it gets a little too hot.
                  >> i know when in the fermenting process the recommended temp is 21 degrees
                  >> Celsius.
                  >> and if it gets to cold (i dont know the temp reading for this) the process
                  >> stops.
                  >> but what happens when it gets to hot and at what temp does it roughly
                  >> happen at.
                  >>
                  >> please and thank you
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  --
                  Er. Prashant Jha
                  Asst. Engineer
                  Sri Renuka Sugars Limited

                • Chris Riddiford
                  Yeah that would be the problem I thought turbos where good around 21c or so place summer down here my fermention bucked temp strip can hit 38 degress :s Might
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jan 1, 2013
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                    Yeah that would be the problem I thought turbos where good around 21c or so place summer down here my fermention bucked temp strip can hit 38 degress :s

                    Might wait till "winter" befor tring another wash.

                    On Jan 2, 2013 6:25 AM, "fatbloke" <fatbloke@...> wrote:
                     

                    Any suggestion of fermenting in the 30's tells me that you haven't done much home brewing of any type.....

                    It depends on what is being fermented, but even this years "reds", using a professional yeast (BDX) seemed to perform best at about 26C.

                    Of course theres other yeast that have very wide temp tolerances, a good example being Lallemand/Lalvin K1-V1116 (listed as being capable of fermenting between about 10 and 35c max. With best results in the high teens to low 20s.

                    So it's not such a good idea to push the numbers unless you really want high levels of fusels coming through.

                    Even standard "brewing belts" are fixed at 24c which is plenty of warmth for the yeast, unless you're aiming to use one of the less temp tolerant wine yeasts on some special grapes.

                    Turbos and sugar wash also appear to work best at the high teens/low 20s too. Equally I wouldnt push them to any theoretical limit either.

                    Pip pip!

                    "Er. Prashant Jha" <prashant771@...> wrote:
                     

                    You are totally wrong on the point that yeast optimum temperature is
                    39 degree. The optimum working temp for yeast (sachharomyces
                    cerevisiea) is 31-33 degree. When temp of mash increases above 33
                    degree the yeast viability falls drastically. As yeast are not
                    thermotolerant that is they withstand high temp therefore it starts
                    dying. Below 30 degree celcius the yeast becomes dormant that is their
                    action stops. If yeast dies after completion of fermentation than
                    there is no issue as it is said that died yeast also add flavor to the
                    product. However if you want to seperate dead yeast then you either
                    have to centrifuge the beer or have to filter it.

                    On 12/29/12, blscarter <blscarter@...> wrote:
                    > Hi Chris
                    >
                    > i have been told that it is 39 degrees & then the yeast dies. you can still
                    > cook it it off as normal but the quantity will be less. try putting your
                    > fermenter in a tub of water & add freezer blocks to it to keep the temp
                    > down. that is what i have done with my wash as i am down under too. hope
                    > this helps.
                    >
                    > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "skub13" <chris2pher13@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> Hi people, just need to double check some stuff to do with the yeast
                    >> because im down under it gets a little too hot.
                    >> i know when in the fermenting process the recommended temp is 21 degrees
                    >> Celsius.
                    >> and if it gets to cold (i dont know the temp reading for this) the process
                    >> stops.
                    >> but what happens when it gets to hot and at what temp does it roughly
                    >> happen at.
                    >>
                    >> please and thank you
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    --
                    Er. Prashant Jha
                    Asst. Engineer
                    Sri Renuka Sugars Limited

                  • tgfoitwoods
                    Chris, Two things strike me about your fermentation. First, when you boil the water, you drive out all the oxygen that the yeast needs to multiply, making the
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jan 1, 2013
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                      Chris,

                      Two things strike me about your fermentation. First, when you boil the water, you drive out all the oxygen that the yeast needs to multiply, making the yeast's job very hard. You need to aerate/oxygenate the water before you pitch the yeast. This can be done by agitating the liquid with a whisk or a drywall mud stirrer (depending on the amount of wash you have) or by using an aquarium airstone to bubble air or O2 through the wash.

                      Second, I hear no mention of yeast nutrients in your wash. Yeast does not live by sugar alone. Your local homebrew supply should have a couple-three kinds of yeast nutrient, or you can use DAP (di-ammonium phosphate) or Miracle-Gro or compound your own.

                      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits


                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Riddiford wrote:
                      >
                      > Okay fair enough but this raises a rather annoying question. For the second
                      > time in a row my fermeting process hasn't really happened, I've chucked in
                      > my dextros and carbon packs to boilling water then waitted till the temp
                      > was 21-24 degress before adding my turbo yeast.
                      >
                      > It just seems to foam up and nothing else.
                      ----snip----
                    • Chris Riddiford
                      Wow fair enough, that would explain it then, thanks for the help maybe ill keep it more simple and fine an easy spirts recipe to follow
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jan 1, 2013
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                        Wow fair enough, that would explain it then, thanks for the help maybe ill keep it more simple and fine an easy spirts recipe to follow

                        On Jan 2, 2013 3:54 PM, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                         

                        Chris,

                        Two things strike me about your fermentation. First, when you boil the water, you drive out all the oxygen that the yeast needs to multiply, making the yeast's job very hard. You need to aerate/oxygenate the water before you pitch the yeast. This can be done by agitating the liquid with a whisk or a drywall mud stirrer (depending on the amount of wash you have) or by using an aquarium airstone to bubble air or O2 through the wash.

                        Second, I hear no mention of yeast nutrients in your wash. Yeast does not live by sugar alone. Your local homebrew supply should have a couple-three kinds of yeast nutrient, or you can use DAP (di-ammonium phosphate) or Miracle-Gro or compound your own.

                        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits


                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Riddiford wrote:
                        >
                        > Okay fair enough but this raises a rather annoying question. For the second
                        > time in a row my fermeting process hasn't really happened, I've chucked in
                        > my dextros and carbon packs to boilling water then waitted till the temp
                        > was 21-24 degress before adding my turbo yeast.
                        >
                        > It just seems to foam up and nothing else.
                        ----snip----

                      • Alex Netherton
                        I think you will find that yeast is pretty much anaerobic. As soon is it begins to produce carbon dioxide, respiration is anaerobic anyway. MOD EDIT: Alex,
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jan 2, 2013
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                          I think you will find that yeast is pretty much anaerobic. As soon is it begins to produce carbon dioxide, respiration is anaerobic anyway.

                          Chris Riddiford wrote:

                          Wow fair enough, that would explain it then, thanks for the help maybe ill keep it more simple and fine an easy spirts recipe to follow

                          On Jan 2, 2013 3:54 PM, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                           

                          Chris,

                          Two things strike me about your fermentation. First, when you boil the water, you drive out all the oxygen that the yeast needs to multiply, making the yeast's job very hard. You need to aerate/oxygenate the water before you pitch the yeast. This can be done by agitating the liquid with a whisk or a drywall mud stirrer (depending on the amount of wash you have) or by using an aquarium airstone to bubble air or O2 through the wash.

                          Second, I hear no mention of yeast nutrients in your wash. Yeast does not live by sugar alone. Your local homebrew supply should have a couple-three kinds of yeast nutrient, or you can use DAP (di-ammonium phosphate) or Miracle-Gro or compound your own.

                          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits


                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Riddiford wrote:
                          >
                          > Okay fair enough but this raises a rather annoying question. For the second
                          > time in a row my fermeting process hasn't really happened, I've chucked in
                          > my dextros and carbon packs to boilling water then waitted till the temp
                          > was 21-24 degress before adding my turbo yeast.
                          >
                          > It just seems to foam up and nothing else.
                          ----snip----

                        • Jeff Kimble
                          Yeast require oxygen to reproduce, there have been some experiments at New Belgium brewery around providing the oxygen in the form of olive oil. zBob is
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jan 3, 2013
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                            Yeast require oxygen to reproduce,  there have been some experiments at New Belgium brewery around providing the oxygen in the form of olive oil.  zBob is correct in needing to oxygenate your wash to allow for the yeast growth.    After the growth phase comes the metabolization of alcohol.  Once the sugars are converted, the yeast will go dormant or die off and create additional flavors/phenols in your batch

                            Your turbo yeast should contain all the nutrients for the yeast that's what makes it turbo, but with that comes more off flavors

                            Cheers

                            On Jan 3, 2013 3:56 PM, "Alex Netherton" <blueridgediscovery@...> wrote:
                             

                            I think you will find that yeast is pretty much anaerobic. As soon is it begins to produce carbon dioxide, respiration is anaerobic anyway.

                            Chris Riddiford wrote:

                             

                            Wow fair enough, that would explain it then, thanks for the help maybe ill keep it more simple and fine an easy spirts recipe to follow

                            On Jan 2, 2013 3:54 PM, "tgfoitwoods" zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                             

                            Chris,

                            Two things strike me about your fermentation. First, when you boil the water, you drive out all the oxygen that the yeast needs to multiply, making the yeast's job very hard. You need to aerate/oxygenate the water before you pitch the yeast. This can be done by agitating the liquid with a whisk or a drywall mud stirrer (depending on the amount of wash you have) or by using an aquarium airstone to bubble air or O2 through the wash.

                            Second, I hear no mention of yeast nutrients in your wash. Yeast does not live by sugar alone. Your local homebrew supply should have a couple-three kinds of yeast nutrient, or you can use DAP (di-ammonium phosphate) or Miracle-Gro or compound your own.

                            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits


                            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Riddiford wrote:
                            >
                            > Okay fair enough but this raises a rather annoying question. For the second
                            > time in a row my fermeting process hasn't really happened, I've chucked in
                            > my dextros and carbon packs to boilling water then waitted till the temp
                            > was 21-24 degress before adding my turbo yeast.
                            >
                            > It just seems to foam up and nothing else.
                            ----snip----

                          • Er. Prashant Jha
                            In my industry(shree renuka sugars), we have 3 fermenters which works on continuous fermentation. We aerate first fermenter at the rate 600 m3 air per hour
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jan 5, 2013
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                              In my industry(shree renuka sugars), we have 3 fermenters which works
                              on continuous fermentation. We aerate first fermenter at the rate 600
                              m3 air per hour with help of blower. Second fermenter is also airated
                              bt less than first. Third fermenter is fully anaerobic. The
                              development of yeast, cell development and growth occurs in first
                              fermenter. Alcohol formation occurs in 2nd and third fermenter.
                              Retention time of all three fermenters is 17 to 18 hours only n alc%
                              in fermented wash is 8 %. Apart from that we also have yeast
                              activation vessel. The yat recieves yeast slurry from decanter where
                              yeast and wash gets seperated. Yat is heavily airated and it acts
                              culture development vessel. The temperature of fermenter is kept at 33
                              degree celcius.

                              On 1/4/13, Jeff Kimble <jeff@...> wrote:
                              > Yeast require oxygen to reproduce, there have been some experiments at New
                              > Belgium brewery around providing the oxygen in the form of olive oil. zBob
                              > is correct in needing to oxygenate your wash to allow for the yeast
                              > growth. After the growth phase comes the metabolization of alcohol.
                              > Once the sugars are converted, the yeast will go dormant or die off and
                              > create additional flavors/phenols in your batch
                              >
                              > Your turbo yeast should contain all the nutrients for the yeast that's what
                              > makes it turbo, but with that comes more off flavors
                              >
                              > Cheers
                              > On Jan 3, 2013 3:56 PM, "Alex Netherton" <blueridgediscovery@...>
                              > wrote:
                              >
                              >> **
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> I think you will find that yeast is pretty much anaerobic. As soon is it
                              >> begins to produce carbon dioxide, respiration is anaerobic anyway.
                              >>
                              >> Chris Riddiford ** wrote:
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >> Wow fair enough, that would explain it then, thanks for the help maybe
                              >> ill
                              >> keep it more simple and fine an easy spirts recipe to follow
                              >> On Jan 2, 2013 3:54 PM, "tgfoitwoods" zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                              >>
                              >>> **
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >>> Chris,
                              >>>
                              >>> Two things strike me about your fermentation. First, when you boil the
                              >>> water, you drive out all the oxygen that the yeast needs to multiply,
                              >>> making the yeast's job very hard. You need to aerate/oxygenate the water
                              >>> before you pitch the yeast. This can be done by agitating the liquid with
                              >>> a
                              >>> whisk or a drywall mud stirrer (depending on the amount of wash you
                              >>> have)
                              >>> or by using an aquarium airstone to bubble air or O2 through the wash.
                              >>>
                              >>> Second, I hear no mention of yeast nutrients in your wash. Yeast does
                              >>> not
                              >>> live by sugar alone. Your local homebrew supply should have a
                              >>> couple-three
                              >>> kinds of yeast nutrient, or you can use DAP (di-ammonium phosphate) or
                              >>> Miracle-Gro or compound your own.
                              >>>
                              >>> Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller *Making Fine
                              >>> Spirits*<http://www.kelleybarts.com/zymurgy-bob-books/making-fine-spirits/>
                              >>>
                              >>>
                              >>> --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Riddiford ** wrote:
                              >>> >
                              >>> > Okay fair enough but this raises a rather annoying question. For the
                              >>> second
                              >>> > time in a row my fermeting process hasn't really happened, I've
                              >>> > chucked
                              >>> in
                              >>> > my dextros and carbon packs to boilling water then waitted till the
                              >>> > temp
                              >>> > was 21-24 degress before adding my turbo yeast.
                              >>> >
                              >>> > It just seems to foam up and nothing else.
                              >>> ----snip----
                              >>> **
                              >>>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >


                              --
                              Er. Prashant Jha
                              Asst. Engineer
                              Sri Renuka Sugars Limited
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