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Question about end of fermenting

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  • Byron
    Is there any harm in leaving the mash to sit for a period of time (anywhere from a day to a month) beyond the end of yeast activity? Want to be sure I won t
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 19, 2012
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      Is there any harm in leaving the mash to sit for a period of time (anywhere from a day to a month) beyond the end of yeast activity? Want to be sure I won't cause trouble for myself by waiting until I have time to finish the process.

      Thanks.
    • Bob Glicksman
      While most bacteria will be killed by 10% or so alcohol, the bacteria that turn your wine into vinegar will not be so affected. I suggest sterilizing the
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 21, 2012
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        While most bacteria will be killed by 10% or so alcohol, the bacteria that turn your "wine" into vinegar will not be so affected.  I suggest sterilizing the mash (the "beer", actually).  You can add potassium metabisulfite or sodium bisulfite (campden tablets - crushed) to the beer.  Either of these compounds will dissolve and generate sulfer dioxide gas -- a food sterilizing agent.  Bottle up your beer so that there is very little air and the bottle is sealed.  In other words, just the way they bottle up wine.  You can buy these chemicals in any wine or beer making store or on-line of course).
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Byron <odiekokee@...>
        To: new_distillers <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wed, Nov 21, 2012 8:54 pm
        Subject: [new_distillers] Question about end of fermenting

         
        Is there any harm in leaving the mash to sit for a period of time (anywhere from a day to a month) beyond the end of yeast activity? Want to be sure I won't cause trouble for myself by waiting until I have time to finish the process.

        Thanks.

      • Alex Netherton
        I must say that I don t distill, but many in my family did. You don t ever want to let your mash sit after working off ; the acetic acid bacteria will get in
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 24, 2012
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          I must say that I don't distill, but many in my family did.
          You don't ever want to let your mash sit after "working off"; the acetic acid bacteria will get in and turn your alcohol into vinegar. They are anaerobic, thus when the mash is fermenting, they cannot take hold, as the by product of fermentation, along with alcohol, is CO2. As long as fermentation is going on, these bacteria are unable to get established. So, you want to distill as soon as your mash has worked off.
          Another thing here, is that the acetic acid will have chemical reactions with the metal parts of your still, especially if you have done something wrong like using solder to seal the "rig". This acid reacts with the lead, forming Plumbic acetate (acetate of lead), which is horribly toxic, even in small amounts. Other metals found in trace amounts in copper or braising metal can do the same. The lead products will get into your final product and kill anyone who drinks it, or make them sick with something from which they never recover.

          I would leave sulfites alone; they might flavor the final product. Just do it like people have done for thousands of years; work off the mash, distill immediately, filter through charcoal, bottle it up.
          Alex Netherton Asheville NC
          Blue Ridge Discovery
          On 11/22/2012 12:28 AM, Bob Glicksman wrote:
           

          While most bacteria will be killed by 10% or so alcohol, the bacteria that turn your "wine" into vinegar will not be so affected.  I suggest sterilizing the mash (the "beer", actually).  You can add potassium metabisulfite or sodium bisulfite (campden tablets - crushed) to the beer.  Either of these compounds will dissolve and generate sulfer dioxide gas -- a food sterilizing agent.  Bottle up your beer so that there is very little air and the bottle is sealed.  In other words, just the way they bottle up wine.  You can buy these chemicals in any wine or beer making store or on-line of course).
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Byron <odiekokee@...>
          To: new_distillers <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wed, Nov 21, 2012 8:54 pm
          Subject: [new_distillers] Question about end of fermenting

           
          Is there any harm in leaving the mash to sit for a period of time (anywhere from a day to a month) beyond the end of yeast activity? Want to be sure I won't cause trouble for myself by waiting until I have time to finish the process.

          Thanks.


        • GGB
          Alex Netherton wrote: Acetic acid bacteria ... /anaerobic/... Did you mean to say that Acetobacter is an aerobic bacteria? Because it is. Vinegar is produced
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 24, 2012
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            Alex Netherton wrote: "Acetic acid bacteria ... /anaerobic/..."

            Did you mean to say that Acetobacter is an aerobic bacteria? Because it is. Vinegar is produced commercially by bubbling large amounts of air through wine.

            While your worked-out wash is sealed away from air, the acetic acid bacteria cannot get a hold. But in practise it is a good idea to rack off wine or beer because the dying yeast will impart flavours of its own.

            Paul
          • bob@4agoodauction.com
            ... bacteria cannot get a hold. But in practise it is a good idea to rack off wine or beer because the dying yeast will impart flavours of its own. Paul I have
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 25, 2012
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              >While your worked-out wash is sealed away from air, the acetic acid
              bacteria cannot get a hold. But in practise it is a good idea to rack off
              wine or beer because the dying yeast will impart flavours of its own.

              Paul

              I have kept a fermented product up to a year in sealed container with no
              problems. I just did not get the time to do anything with it. I have also
              lost an uncovered mash in about three days to the vinegar and other bacteria
              turning it to stinky and terrible and basically offensive in every way.
              There is a lot of different invaders just floating around in the air looking
              for good mash.

              Bob c

              .



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