Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [new_distillers] Wood for Aging

Expand Messages
  • M L
    Daryl, I ve heard you can use wood from fruit and nut trees. But it is better to use wood that has aged some . Like don t use wood from a tree that was alive
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 9, 2012
      Daryl, I've heard you can use wood from fruit and nut trees. But it is better to use wood that has aged some . Like don't use wood from a tree that was alive when cut unless it has been allowed to dry awhile. ML

      --- On Wed, 7/4/12, daryl_bee <darylbender@...> wrote:

      From: daryl_bee <darylbender@...>
      Subject: [new_distillers] Wood for Aging
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, July 4, 2012, 7:53 AM

       

      Are there any other woods besides white oak that are good for aging? I do woodwork and often have masses of planer shavings which just get thrown away (right now it's Butternut). I know white oak was originally chosen as it was good for watertight barrels (red oak for dry goods barrels). Has anybody experimented with this or know of information on this? One wonders what a Walnut or Mesquite or ??? flavoured beverage would be like.

      Re: [new_distillers] New Hardware

      You want to be careful when using dark oak from furniture, it might be red oak which is not desirable to use in flavoring a beverage. It is said to give an astringent taste. You can test it by cutting a strip with the grain and dip it in a glass of water . Then try to blow air through it . Red oak will bubble, white oak should not . This is not 100 accurate though. Another way is to put a few drops of a sodium nitrite solution on it. If it turns dark it is white oak.If you don't want to buy oak from a home brew supply store you might get some Jack Daniels smoking wood from Wal-Mart or Bass Pro.It's actual chunks of used whiskey barrels.ML

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.