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Re: [new_distillers] Can mash go bad after fermentation?

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  • Bob Glicksman
    Winemakers sulfite their want to prevent contamination. You can use sodium bisulfate (campden tablets) or potassium meta-bisulfate. You can get this stuff in
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 3, 2012
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      Winemakers sulfite their want to prevent contamination.  You can use sodium bisulfate (campden tablets) or potassium meta-bisulfate.  You can get this stuff in any wine or beer making store (or on-line).  It is very cheap.  Fill up some bottles (e.g. sterized, empty wine bottles) with your beer, add in the recommeded amount of whichever of these you choose (campden tablets are handy -- one crushed tablet per one gallon of beer), and make an airtight cap; e.g. cork the wine bottles.  The sodium bisulfate or potassium meta-bisulfate dissolves and releases sulfer dioxide (SO2) gas which will keep your beer sterile until you are ready to distill.  This works for wine and beer, so I imagine that it will work for whatever you are brewing.  It's very safe too.  All commercial wine is sulfited and you can uncork the bottle and drink the wine right away with no harm to you, albeit airing our the wine helps release the SO2 gas which some folks believe distorts the subtle taste of the wine.  SO2 gas is widely used in food preservation and is entire safe to breath or drink.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jonathan <jonmwren@...>
      To: new_distillers <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sun, Jun 3, 2012 8:00 pm
      Subject: [new_distillers] Can mash go bad after fermentation?

       
      Ok so my mash is done fermenting and I dont have the time to cook/distill it right now.

      Is it possible for me to strain it an then cap it and put in the fridge or something to hold it for a little bit? If so how long can it sit like this, I don't imagine it can sit for vary long?

      If you can help me out on this one that would be great I would rather not lose this batch.

    • wilypig@gmail.com
      You can strain and bottle then refrigerate with out any chemicals but you will have to deal with spoilage organisms that my sour the mash. not a big deal since
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 4, 2012
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        You can strain and bottle then refrigerate with out any chemicals but you will have to deal with spoilage organisms that my sour the mash. not a big deal since you will be processing it later.

        On , Bob Glicksman <bobg542492@...> wrote:
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        > Winemakers sulfite their want to prevent contamination.  You can use sodium bisulfate (campden tablets) or potassium meta-bisulfate.  You can get this stuff in any wine or beer making store (or on-line).  It is very cheap.  Fill up some bottles (e.g. sterized, empty wine bottles) with your beer, add in the recommeded amount of whichever of these you choose (campden tablets are handy -- one crushed tablet per one gallon of beer), and make an airtight cap; e.g. cork the wine bottles.  The sodium bisulfate or potassium meta-bisulfate dissolves and releases sulfer dioxide (SO2) gas which will keep your beer sterile until you are ready to distill.  This works for wine and beer, so I imagine that it will work for whatever you are brewing.  It's very safe too.  All commercial wine is sulfited and you can uncork the bottle and drink the wine right away with no harm to you, albeit airing our the wine helps release the SO2 gas which some folks believe distorts the subtle taste of the wine.  SO2 gas is widely used in food preservation and is entire safe to breath or drink.
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        > -----Original Message-----
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        > From: Jonathan jonmwren@...>
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        > To: new_distillers new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
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        > Sent: Sun, Jun 3, 2012 8:00 pm
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        > Subject: [new_distillers] Can mash go bad after fermentation?
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        > Ok so my mash is done fermenting and I dont have the time to cook/distill it right now.
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        > Is it possible for me to strain it an then cap it and put in the fridge or something to hold it for a little bit? If so how long can it sit like this, I don't imagine it can sit for vary long?
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        > If you can help me out on this one that would be great I would rather not lose this batch.
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      • GGB
        ...you will have to deal with spoilage organisms that my sour the mash. Having done a little reading lately on making vinegar, I can tell you it is really
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 4, 2012
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          "...you will have to deal with spoilage organisms that my sour the mash."

          Having done a little reading lately on making vinegar, I can tell you it is really important to exclude oxygen from your mash to stop it going sour.

          A class of bacteria called acetobacter needs oxygen to respire and feeds on ethanol to make acetic acid as a waste product. That is how vinegar has been made for many, many years. Acetobacter are plentiful in the atmosphere and will naturally colonize your mash if open to the atmosphere.

          No oxygen = no sour.

          Paul
        • wilypig@gmail.com
          Snip Except that most mash contain Lacto bacillus which will feed on what ever the yeast won t and does not need O2 to create Lactic acid. refrigeration slows
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 6, 2012
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            Snip

            Except that most mash contain Lacto bacillus which will feed on what ever the yeast won't and does not need O2 to create Lactic acid. refrigeration slows down lacto bacillus. One thing to remember is that no PATHOGENIC organisms can survive the Ph and alcohol environment created by fermentation. process as soon possible for best results.
          • robertjusting
            This side of the homedistillers.org answers it all. Feel free to check it, there s a lot of stuffs you ought to know. How long will my wash last before I run
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 7, 2012
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              This side of the homedistillers.org answers it all. Feel free to check it, there's a lot of stuffs you ought to know.  


              Hope this helps!


              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Jonathan" <jonmwren@...> wrote:
              >
              > Ok so my mash is done fermenting and I dont have the time to cook/distill it right now.
              >
              > Is it possible for me to strain it an then cap it and put in the fridge or something to hold it for a little bit? If so how long can it sit like this, I don't imagine it can sit for vary long?
              >
              > If you can help me out on this one that would be great I would rather not lose this batch.
              >
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