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Copper Thickness

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  • suborbital
    Hi, This topic has been discussed somewhat before but naturally I can t find it now. After calling around, the heaviest copper I can find locally is 12 oz
    Message 1 of 7 , May 29, 2012
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      Hi,

      This topic has been discussed somewhat before but naturally I can't find it now.

      After calling around, the heaviest copper I can find locally is 12 oz flashing for 
      roofing. How big a pot still can I make using 12 oz copper sheet? 5 gallon? 
      10? One million gallons (said in a Dr. Evil voice)? Would doubling it up at 
      the bottom help?

      I've also got a related question. Pintoshine (nice video!) used solder and 
      rivets to hold his still together. Will just solder (or just rivets) work or does
      it have to be both?

      thanks!
    • robertjusting
      I m not sure about your first questions. However about assembling a pot still, you may just solder it (just make sure you use a lead-free solder). Using only
      Message 2 of 7 , May 31, 2012
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        I'm not sure about your first questions. However about assembling a pot still, you may just solder it (just make sure you use a lead-free solder). Using only rivets will cause leaks unless you also solder it or paste some linseed oil mixture to seal off the spaces. These pages might be helpful:



      • suborbital@rocketmail.com
        Thanks Robert. I hadn t heard of the linseed mixture before. It sounds like runny glazers putty (the old kind).
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 2, 2012
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          Thanks Robert. I hadn't heard of the linseed mixture
          before. It sounds like runny glazers' putty (the old
          kind).

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "robertjusting" <robertjusting@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm not sure about your first questions. However about assembling a pot
          > still, you may just solder it (just make sure you use a lead-free
          > solder). Using only rivets will cause leaks unless you also solder it or
          > paste some linseed oil mixture to seal off the spaces. These pages might
          > be helpful:
          > http://www.whiskeystill.net/pages/how-to-make-a-moonshine-still
          >
          > http://www.whiskeystill.net/pages/what-to-do-about-leaks
          >
        • daryl_bee
          You typically can get it at a place that specializes in metal/copper if you special order it and pay up front. Long long ago I ordered two sheets (3ft x 9ft)
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 2, 2012
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            You typically can get it at a place that specializes in metal/copper if you special order it and pay up front. Long long ago I ordered two sheets (3ft x 9ft) of .060 and it had to come from the mill in Chicago. It came in a flat wood crate by 18 wheeler to the dealer (in a city 250 miles away). When I got the call I went and picked it up in my pick-up after the brokerage was done. Very straight forward.

            I recall two funny things happened on that trip 20+ years ago.

            1) I wanted to keep the copper flat so had it in the back with the gate down. It was quite heavy! I was leaving the city and when a light turned green I hit the gas and while the truck went through the intersection the inertia of the copper and the slipperiness of the crate in the bed kept it at the stop line. Luckily it was about 2:00 in the afternoon and not busy. In the middle of this massive metropolitan area I ran back, picked up one end of this 9ft long crate and, like a mule on steroids, ran back through the 4x3 lane intersection to the truck dragging the crate behind me. After that I put the gate up.

            2) Further on the way back I thought I would stop in at a distillery (out in a rural location) that offered tours (now it was late afternoon). When I got there no one seemed to be around. I had already driven past what seemed to be a deserted visitor center. Anyway these giant chain-link gates were wide open so I drove in and around all these brick buildings looking for someone I could ask about tours. Nobody. Well I started to head back out and when I got near the gates there was this old security guy (all winded) who came running up to me, panting. I turned the radio down and asked "Where do you go for the tours?" He said "Didn't you hear me" (i had had the radio on playing tunes). "I was chasing you waving my arms! You can't be in here!! This is the bonded warehouse area!!" It suddenly dawned on me what I had inadvertently done. He gave the truck a look-over and asked about what was in the back. "Oh just copper". I think he could see I was genuine and not on some drive-by booze heist and since he had not been at his post/guard-hut I could tell he wanted to drop the mater (& I certainly didn't want to discuss what the copper was for). He told me to move ahead so he could close the gates and then the two of us "black sheep" had a good friendly chat on distilling etc where he did tell me when tours (& open hours) were. I did do the tour on a subsequent trip - that was marvelous.

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, suborbital <suborbital@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > This topic has been discussed somewhat before but naturally I can't find it now.
            >
            > After calling around, the heaviest copper I can find locally is 12 oz flashing for 
            > roofing. How big a pot still can I make using 12 oz copper sheet? 5 gallon? 
            > 10? One million gallons (said in a Dr. Evil voice)? Would doubling it up at 
            > the bottom help?
            >
            > I've also got a related question. Pintoshine (nice video!) used solder and 
            > rivets to hold his still together. Will just solder (or just rivets) work or does
            > it have to be both?
            >
            > thanks!
            >
          • suborbital@rocketmail.com
            You had a fun trip Daryl. Amazing how strong people get when adrenaline kicks in.
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 4, 2012
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              You had a fun trip Daryl. Amazing how strong people get when adrenaline kicks in.

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "daryl_bee" <darylbender@...> wrote:
              >
            • robertjusting
              Yeah, well it works the same. It would be better if you just solder it, it will completely seal off the still.
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 5, 2012
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                Yeah, well it works the same. It would be better if you just solder it, it will completely seal off the still.

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "suborbital@..." <suborbital@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Thanks Robert. I hadn't heard of the linseed mixture
                > before. It sounds like runny glazers' putty (the old
                > kind).
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "robertjusting" <robertjusting@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I'm not sure about your first questions. However about assembling a pot
                > > still, you may just solder it (just make sure you use a lead-free
                > > solder). Using only rivets will cause leaks unless you also solder it or
                > > paste some linseed oil mixture to seal off the spaces. These pages might
                > > be helpful:
                > > http://www.whiskeystill.net/pages/how-to-make-a-moonshine-still
                > >
                > > http://www.whiskeystill.net/pages/what-to-do-about-leaks
                > >
                >
              • suborbital@rocketmail.com
                That would be simplest. Part of why I asked about solder vs rivets vs both came from reading about the restoration of George Washington s distillery. So far as
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 6, 2012
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                  That would be simplest.

                  Part of why I asked about solder vs rivets vs both came from
                  reading about the restoration of George Washington's distillery.
                  So far as I can tell, that still is just riveted.

                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "robertjusting" <robertjusting@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Yeah, well it works the same. It would be better if you just solder it, it will completely seal off the still.
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "suborbital@" <suborbital@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Thanks Robert. I hadn't heard of the linseed mixture
                  > > before. It sounds like runny glazers' putty (the old
                  > > kind).
                  > >
                  > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "robertjusting" <robertjusting@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I'm not sure about your first questions. However about assembling a pot
                  > > > still, you may just solder it (just make sure you use a lead-free
                  > > > solder). Using only rivets will cause leaks unless you also solder it or
                  > > > paste some linseed oil mixture to seal off the spaces. These pages might
                  > > > be helpful:
                  > > > http://www.whiskeystill.net/pages/how-to-make-a-moonshine-still
                  > > >
                  > > > http://www.whiskeystill.net/pages/what-to-do-about-leaks
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
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