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Re: [new_distillers] Wood aging spirits

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  • Steve
    Generally, you will cut the spirit to around 60-65%, then age. Steve Roberson ... From: White Bear To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, April
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 4, 2012
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      Generally, you will cut the spirit to around 60-65%, then age.
       
       
      Steve Roberson
       

       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2012 2:50 PM
      Subject: [new_distillers] Wood aging spirits

       

      Friends-
        I have been following a thread pertaining to aging spirits with charred oak sticks.  I am a newbe here and was just wondering- are the charred sticks placed in the spirits before cutting or after.  Thanks for every and all answers.
       
      White Bear

    • waljaco
      In Poland they use potatoes with a high starch content! Even with a maximum of 20% fermentable material potatoes cannot match grain at about 60%. Most table
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 5, 2012
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        In Poland they use potatoes with a high starch content! Even with a maximum of 20% fermentable material potatoes cannot match grain at about 60%. Most table potatoes have only a 10% fermentable content.
        Potatoes need to be cooked to rupture starch cells - any natural enzymes will be thus destroyed and thus need to be added to convert the starch to fermentable sugars.
        See -
        http://tinyurl.com/2ue7u
        wal

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
        >
        > Willy,
        >
        > My first question is about your "reading about 4% ABV". What instrument
        > did you use to get an ABV reading from what may be a partially-fermented
        > wash?
        >
        > As far as converting the potato starch by "natural" means, specifically
        > avoiding commercial enzymes, I'd go for a good malted 6-row barley. If
        > you take care with conversion temperatures and pH, you should be able to
        > utilize the alpha- and beta-amylase enzymes in the malt to convert the
        > potato starch (after cooking the potatoes, from what I recall).
        >
        > Having said that, for years we've watched people on this list (and
        > others) try to make potato vodka, with great frustration and/or
        > dissatisfaction. Skilled or newby, the only person I've ever heard admit
        > to "success" is Pintoshine with his purchased enzymes, the link I passed
        > to you (last week?). We all know it can be done, but yield and
        > satisfaction may not make it worthwhile to you.
        >
        > Just one stiller's opinion.
        >
        > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits
        > <http://kelleybarts.com/MFS.html>
        >
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Frank B." <lostwilly929@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > I ended up using 3 tablets in a 3 gallon mash. It want ballistic for
        > about 12 hours and died. Nothing I tried brought it back, additions of
        > sugar, yeast, nutrient, B-12, and Epsom Salts (Mg SO4). after now 4
        > days I'm reading about 4% ABV. Tonight, after taps, I'll be adding this
        > mash to the compost pile. I'd really like to know how vodka like hooch
        > was made back when there wasn't a myriad of additives to confuse us not
        > so bright shiners. My intuition tells me to use only natural and
        > available stuff for my brew....the best source of natural amylase enzyme
        > is saliva... so, the next mash I guess I'm chewing up 5 or 10 pounds of
        > raw spuds. What do you guys think of that approach?
        > >
        >
      • Frank B.
        @ Harry and  Zymurgy Bob, thanks for the input. it s all good stuff.  I used both an alco-meter and sp.gr. calculation to get my guess of 4%.  I did a
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 5, 2012
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          @ Harry and  Zymurgy Bob, thanks for the input. it's all good stuff.  I used both an alco-meter and sp.gr. calculation to get my guess of 4%.  I did a stripping run of about 3.5 gallons and got 20 oz. of 90 proof out of it.  It was a lot of work for a very small return, but, I'm kinda hard headed about things like that.  I seem to "know" there is something there to discover and really want to know what it is....hope it's more than just re-proving something doesn't work, lol.  I guess I'm just a purest at heart, I'd like to grow my own fermentables, build my own still and do it all off the grid some place as a hermit.  Potatoes seemed and easy thing to grow.  I know the best loaf of bread I ever made was with hand ground flour and baked in a rock and foil oven next to a camp fire; hoping potato vodka gets me the same feeling (been a loafer myself for a few moons, Harry).  I like the nut's and bolt's approach to distilling, how things work...just open a few packages isn't going to teach me much.  I've been married twice, so following directions doesn't come easy to me.

          As all my potato mashes have failed to various degrees, I am going to a corn mash (crack it myself with a hand grinder) and see what that makes.  Potatoes will still be with me, as will trying to get the starches to convert...may be there is a particular mold I can find that produces the right enzymes...might be as simple as putting sour dough bread on the mash in a hooch fashion.  I got more time and toys than talent (at present) so why not experiment?  what ever alcohol I can tease out I can save and redistill a time or two...may get a nice neutral spirit or something better suited to an alcohol stove; either way it's the journey not the the destination, right?

          Willy  
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