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Re: Oxygen?

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  • daryl_bee
    Well you all inspired me to go out and get an air stone (never heard of one before). After trying unsuccessfully at all the local brew shops I was able to get
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 31, 2012
      Well you all inspired me to go out and get an air stone (never heard of one before). After trying unsuccessfully at all the local brew shops I was able to get a 6" cylindrical grey ceramic one at the local "Pet Smart" along with some silicone tubing. Last night I hauled my torch rig into the kitchen and pulled the tube over the tip (very tight). I held the ceramic stone sideways ("T") to the end of my 3 ft wooden spoon with elastics then placed it in the fermenter. This fermenter had yeast pitched in the morning so I didn't want to go too long and upset things too much. After that I opened the tank valve and started adjusting the oxygen valve on the torch. Wow! It makes a broad stream of bubble and by adjusting the valve I can get everything from a low slow gentle bubbling (what I'll likely use) to a boiling froth 3-4" high. Very impressive. Now I just have to wait for the next re-start on the fermenter. I've been graphing SG, temp & % vs Time on excel so maybe I can spot differences.

      On a separate note, one of my previous runs was not a sugar wash but a (corn) sour mash and it came out of the still with a very slight white cloudy haze. I had previously obtained one of those "Buon Vino" mini jet filter pumps so I thought I'd try it out for the first time. I must say on my second attempt it did a fantastic job of clarifying it with #2 filters. Not only is it sparkling clear but smells better too (it's only first run stuff). If you try this however and think "what could possibly go wrong with this tiny pump" just be sure to 1) don't set up on the living room coffee table and 2) be sure to put the filters in with the holes in line and rough side forward or you'll block the pump and end up with a 2ft alcohol volcano out between the filter plates - another night in the doghouse ;-)

      Anyway thanks for all the advice!

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, ben marks <nebskram@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > i got a tank of medical oxygen and give my beer and everything else a 5- 10 minute shot of it and things work out fine i had to buy a regulator/gage set for it at a cost of $30 but i still have the same tank 4 years later i also use a .5 micron stainless steal stone well worth the money i spent ...ben
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      > ________________________________
      >
      > Whiskey is What Beer Wants to Be When it Grows Up
      > ______________________
      >
      > Your Car is German. Your Vodka is Russian. Your Pizza Italian. Your
      > Kebab is Turkish. Your Democracy is Greek. Your Coffee Brazilian.
      > Your Movies are American. Your Tea is Chinese. Your Shirt is Mexican.
      > Your Oil is Saudi Arabian. Your Electronics are Japanese. Your Numbers are
      > Arabic, Your Letters are Latin. Your Cocaine is Colombian. And you
      > Complain that your Neighbor is an Immigrant?
      > _________________________
      >
      > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > From: darylbender@...
      > Date: Thu, 29 Mar 2012 20:28:42 +0000
      > Subject: [new_distillers] Oxygen?
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      > Anybody pump oxygen into a starting mash?
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      > I'm thinking of doing this to boost my mash's ending alcohol % by giving the yeast a better start. I'm thinking that I could use my oxy-acetalene rig (set to oxygen only) with a bit of surgical tubing going from the tip down into my 50 liter fermenter. I have no idea how long I should bubble it for.
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      > Alternately I could use my tiny air compressor however I'd be worried about trace oil with that approach.
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      > Anyway I'd love to hear of any experiences with this.
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      > FWIW I'll vouch for the JEM wash with a few tweaks. I mix everything the night before I pitch yeast so it cools down below 30C but I add a pinch of meta-bisulphite to get rid of cloromines in the water and I add 1/2 cup (to 50l) of distillers nutrients. I also use turbo 48 yeast. This typically gets me 13-14% in ~40 hours with 12kg sugar like clockwork. Has a wonderful caramelly smell to it while it's working and sounds like a freshly opened pop playing on the stereo.
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      > Unfortunately I learned the hard way to be *VERY* careful adding/stiring in nutrients to an already started mash. My 2 fermenters are on the kitchen table and once, around midnight (wife nodded off on the couch watching TV) I, standing on a chair worried about what I thought was a stalled mash, threw in 1 cup and no sooner had I moved my 3ft wooden stir spoon I found it like staring into the back of the space shuttle engine on take-off. Within about 3 seconds it had subsided into a 4 sided waterfall - over the fermenter, down the sides, into & over the 3" deep plastic catch tub, across and cascading down all 4 sides of the table and all over the kitchen floor - it went on for a good minute). By this time my wife had awaken (not amused) and it was like we both had gravity boots on as we moved about the super sticky floor. No, won't be doing that again!
      >
    • daryl_bee
      Well I ve tried a couple JEM fermentation runs with oxygenation via the air stone. My process is this (air stone on the end of a 3ft wooden spoon in a 50 liter
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 5, 2012
        Well I've tried a couple JEM fermentation runs with oxygenation via the air stone. My process is this (air stone on the end of a 3ft wooden spoon in a 50 liter fermenter)
        - A few minutes low bubbling before I pitch yeast. I do this usually the morning after I mix all the hot ingredients the night before and they've cooled below 30C.
        - then I pitch yeast (turbo 48), I turn the oxygen on and pour a little yeast and stir it in while bubbling, a little more yeast & stir it in etc. The bubbling oxygen is absolutely fantastic at mixing everything in to a completely homogenous mixture. I mix for about 10 minutes then shut off leaving the spoon (& stone) in.
        - At lunch I give it 10 minutes bubbling then shut off (leaving spoon in).
        - After work I give it another 10 minutes bubbling then I remove & clean everything. Typically at this point the ferment is "coming on the pipe" as it were

        From my observations I note the following;
        - the increase in alcohol percentage is slight, between 0.5%-1.5% for equal SG starts.
        - It appears to cut the fermentation time by about 20%, my SG vs time & % vs time curves look similar (the slight range increase above) but compressed in time. The fermentation now lasts about 2.5 days (was 3)
        - subjectively the fermentation does seem more "robust" although that's hard to quantify
        - temperature swing appears to be the same

        Net-net It seems to work fairly well and is a tremendous way to thoroughly mix your ingredients. The cost to me however was only an air stone and tubing (~$15) as I already had the tanks & regulator. I would recommend this approach as a final improvement to your process after you've explored and worked out all the fermentation fundamentals first.

        Cheers
        Daryl - Again, thanks for all the help & advice!


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "daryl_bee" <darylbender@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well you all inspired me to go out and get an air stone (never heard of one before). After trying unsuccessfully at all the local brew shops I was able to get a 6" cylindrical grey ceramic one at the local "Pet Smart" along with some silicone tubing. Last night I hauled my torch rig into the kitchen and pulled the tube over the tip (very tight). I held the ceramic stone sideways ("T") to the end of my 3 ft wooden spoon with elastics then placed it in the fermenter. This fermenter had yeast pitched in the morning so I didn't want to go too long and upset things too much. After that I opened the tank valve and started adjusting the oxygen valve on the torch. Wow! It makes a broad stream of bubble and by adjusting the valve I can get everything from a low slow gentle bubbling (what I'll likely use) to a boiling froth 3-4" high. Very impressive. Now I just have to wait for the next re-start on the fermenter. I've been graphing SG, temp & % vs Time on excel so maybe I can spot differences.
        >
        > On a separate note, one of my previous runs was not a sugar wash but a (corn) sour mash and it came out of the still with a very slight white cloudy haze. I had previously obtained one of those "Buon Vino" mini jet filter pumps so I thought I'd try it out for the first time. I must say on my second attempt it did a fantastic job of clarifying it with #2 filters. Not only is it sparkling clear but smells better too (it's only first run stuff). If you try this however and think "what could possibly go wrong with this tiny pump" just be sure to 1) don't set up on the living room coffee table and 2) be sure to put the filters in with the holes in line and rough side forward or you'll block the pump and end up with a 2ft alcohol volcano out between the filter plates - another night in the doghouse ;-)
        >
        > Anyway thanks for all the advice!
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, ben marks <nebskram@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > i got a tank of medical oxygen and give my beer and everything else a 5- 10 minute shot of it and things work out fine i had to buy a regulator/gage set for it at a cost of $30 but i still have the same tank 4 years later i also use a .5 micron stainless steal stone well worth the money i spent ...ben
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > >
        > > Whiskey is What Beer Wants to Be When it Grows Up
        > > ______________________
        > >
        > > Your Car is German. Your Vodka is Russian. Your Pizza Italian. Your
        > > Kebab is Turkish. Your Democracy is Greek. Your Coffee Brazilian.
        > > Your Movies are American. Your Tea is Chinese. Your Shirt is Mexican.
        > > Your Oil is Saudi Arabian. Your Electronics are Japanese. Your Numbers are
        > > Arabic, Your Letters are Latin. Your Cocaine is Colombian. And you
        > > Complain that your Neighbor is an Immigrant?
        > > _________________________
        > >
        > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > > From: darylbender@
        > > Date: Thu, 29 Mar 2012 20:28:42 +0000
        > > Subject: [new_distillers] Oxygen?
        > >
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        > >
        > >
        > > Anybody pump oxygen into a starting mash?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I'm thinking of doing this to boost my mash's ending alcohol % by giving the yeast a better start. I'm thinking that I could use my oxy-acetalene rig (set to oxygen only) with a bit of surgical tubing going from the tip down into my 50 liter fermenter. I have no idea how long I should bubble it for.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Alternately I could use my tiny air compressor however I'd be worried about trace oil with that approach.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Anyway I'd love to hear of any experiences with this.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > FWIW I'll vouch for the JEM wash with a few tweaks. I mix everything the night before I pitch yeast so it cools down below 30C but I add a pinch of meta-bisulphite to get rid of cloromines in the water and I add 1/2 cup (to 50l) of distillers nutrients. I also use turbo 48 yeast. This typically gets me 13-14% in ~40 hours with 12kg sugar like clockwork. Has a wonderful caramelly smell to it while it's working and sounds like a freshly opened pop playing on the stereo.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Unfortunately I learned the hard way to be *VERY* careful adding/stiring in nutrients to an already started mash. My 2 fermenters are on the kitchen table and once, around midnight (wife nodded off on the couch watching TV) I, standing on a chair worried about what I thought was a stalled mash, threw in 1 cup and no sooner had I moved my 3ft wooden stir spoon I found it like staring into the back of the space shuttle engine on take-off. Within about 3 seconds it had subsided into a 4 sided waterfall - over the fermenter, down the sides, into & over the 3" deep plastic catch tub, across and cascading down all 4 sides of the table and all over the kitchen floor - it went on for a good minute). By this time my wife had awaken (not amused) and it was like we both had gravity boots on as we moved about the super sticky floor. No, won't be doing that again!
        > >
        >
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