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Emergence of Craft Distilleries

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  • Peggy Korth
    Washington State is now moving to allow craft distilleries http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/02/26/2410877/craft-spirits-law-changes -open.html Does
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 28, 2012
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      Washington State is now moving to allow 'craft' distilleries

       

      http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/02/26/2410877/craft-spirits-law-changes-open.html

       

       

      Does anyone know if there are distillery construction guidelines from the FDA or other regulatory group in the US or is this simply up to the distillery to assure beverage quality?  Perhaps the guidelines are from each individual state.  Surely there are standard guidelines in Europe.

       

      Thanks for your learned advice.

       

      Peggy

       

    • Ben M
      i don t know of any off hand but i m sure there are guidlines. like you wouldn t be able to make it with the use of rat poision. they have guidlines for
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 28, 2012
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        i don't know of any off hand but i'm sure there are guidlines. like you wouldn't be able to make it with the use of rat poision. they have guidlines for commercial booze makers like for jim beam whiskey so i'd think they would be similar for craft and home distilleries.

        I actually believe that moonshine is safer than beer. during fermintation yeast turns the sugar into ethanol and other fusel fuels like menthanol which causes blindness. the beer making process does not get rid of those harmful additives which is why you get headaches or hungover from drinking too much... moonshine is said to be really bad cause its all in such high concentrations but in reality its easy to separate out the harmful stuff and have just the ethanol. the folk lore about shine causing blindness or "jake leg" is due to the prohibition and people adding crazy stuff like fermeldahyde to their shine for a quick buck.

        although thats from the weeks of research i did and Albert Einstein once said you can't believe everything you read on the internet.
      • tgfoitwoods
        Hi Peggy, I ve toured several of the 50% craft distillers (so-called because the new inexpensive license requires that 50% of your feedstock be grown
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 28, 2012
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          Hi Peggy,

          I've toured several of the "50%" craft distillers (so-called because the new inexpensive license requires that 50% of your feedstock be grown in-state) in Washington State, and also many similar distilleries in Oregon. I've had a chance to talk with the founders and distillers at length, and I've not heard much upset at construction guidlines, and to be frank, looking at the distilling plants, construction guidelines appear to be fairly loose.

          Ethanol accounting, on the other hand, is federally mandated, and appears to take a lot of effort to satisfy the feds for taxing purposes. Every drop of ethanol that is or could be produced must be accounted for, and I get the impression that enforcement is stringent. One distiller showed me his spreadsheets to track ethanol, and they were extensive.

          After saying all that, I dearly love the fact that we have distilleries sprouting like mushrooms, even in way-less-than-urban settings, and each of them has a different idea about how to deal with the lack of aged spirits to sell in the first few years of operation. Every one of them is exploring the boundaries of traditional and exotic spirits, and that's just wonderful.

          Hopefully, they'll get around to legalizing us sometime.

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peggy Korth" <rpk@...> wrote:
          >
          > Washington State is now moving to allow 'craft' distilleries
          >
          >
          >
          > http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/02/26/2410877/craft-spirits-law-changes
          > -open.html
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Does anyone know if there are distillery construction guidelines from the
          > FDA or other regulatory group in the US or is this simply up to the
          > distillery to assure beverage quality? Perhaps the guidelines are from each
          > individual state. Surely there are standard guidelines in Europe.
          >
          >
          >
          > Thanks for your learned advice.
          >
          >
          >
          > Peggy
          >
        • Harry
          ... you wouldn t be able to make it with the use of rat poision. they have guidlines for commercial booze makers like for jim beam whiskey so i d think they
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 29, 2012
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            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ben M" <martrx8@...> wrote:
            >
            > i don't know of any off hand but i'm sure there are guidlines. like you wouldn't be able to make it with the use of rat poision. they have guidlines for commercial booze makers like for jim beam whiskey so i'd think they would be similar for craft and home distilleries.
            >
            > I actually believe that moonshine is safer than beer. during fermintation yeast turns the sugar into ethanol and other fusel fuels like menthanol which causes blindness. the beer making process does not get rid of those harmful additives which is why you get headaches or hungover from drinking too much... moonshine is said to be really bad cause its all in such high concentrations but in reality its easy to separate out the harmful stuff and have just the ethanol. the folk lore about shine causing blindness or "jake leg" is due to the prohibition and people adding crazy stuff like fermeldahyde to their shine for a quick buck.
            >
            > although thats from the weeks of research i did and Albert Einstein once said you can't believe everything you read on the internet.
            >

            Nearly right.  But methanol is only formed from fruit type substrates due to pectin content.  At MOST, it may be 4% of the alcohol content.  It is NOT FORMED from table sugar or molasses, and very little from grain substrates.

            "Methanol is formed during alcoholic fermentation of fruits containing pectin as a result of the activities of pectin esterases (PE):

            pectin + n-H20 PE gives n-methanol + pectic acid"

             

            Source:  Biotechnology Letters vol. 2, No.9, 391-396 (1980)

             

            It is easy to reduce in fruit fermentations (by up to 70%) by acidifying the wort to pH2 with sulphuric acid.  Alternatively, you can use pectinase.  

             

            Pectinase is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of pectin, a component of the cell wall in fruits such as apples and oranges. Pectinase is used commercially to aid in extracting juice from fruit. By enzymatically breaking down the cell wall, pectinase releases the juice from within the cells. Pectinase is also used for clarifying the extracted juice.

             

            If you DO have it in your wort, it is difficult to remove completely via simple distillation.  Therefore it is better to reduce the formation in the first place via acidifying or enzyme treatment of the fermentation (the wort) prior to pitching yeast.

             

            Alternatively, simply don't use fruits in substrates.  Rather, add them or their flavours AFTER you have made sugar alcohol and distilled it.  These are fruit infusions, and very tasty beverages.

             

             

            Slainte!

            regards Harry

          • hopefull_romantic
            Does anyone know if there are distillery construction guidelines from the FDA or other regulatory group in the US or is this simply up to the distillery to
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 29, 2012
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              Does anyone know if there are distillery construction guidelines from the
              FDA or other regulatory group in the US or is this simply up to the
              distillery to assure beverage quality? Perhaps the guidelines are from each
              individual state. Surely there are standard guidelines in Europe

               

              Basically the same as for food manufacturing

              Concrete floor

              Stainless steel

              Food grade hoses and handling equipment

               

              But with large scale fermenting and distilling equipment it easier and cheaper to buy it then make it

              Especially if you can get it used and that does happen as some micro brewery’s go out of business and other replace smaller equipment to larger

              And some like rolling rock who sold their old plant to move to a new one

               

              For distilling a bit more lax but till holds to very min food grade laws but adds oak barrel  and such

               

              For both you need a state and ATF federal license and they be very watchful on grain and output as when st elsewhere brewery had a bad batch, He had to have a state ATF agent there to watch him dump the brewing tank down the drain

               

              magnus

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