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Re: Tiny bubbles and other questions

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  • chem_engr_shiner
    I searched high and low for the bubble clouding and came up empty handed so if someone could point me in the right direction I d appreciate it. As far as the
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 23, 2012
      I searched high and low for the bubble clouding and came up empty handed so if someone could point me in the right direction I'd appreciate it. As far as the yeast goes Im not worried about the microbes themselves getting into my product only what could be created and carried over by possibly burning them. I am cooking on a stove top with the hopes of retrofitting a heating element or two in the future. Is there less of a chance of scorching the yeast with a propane setup?
    • Fredrick Lee
      Direct firing your boiler distributes the heat along the entire bottom of the vessel. Elements often have a higher energy density and can scorch the suspended
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 24, 2012
        Direct firing your boiler distributes the heat along the entire bottom of the vessel. Elements often have a higher energy density and can scorch the suspended yeast, but so can direct firing if it is too hot.  I use a direct fired boiler and try not to exceed 1.2°C  heating increase per minute. If when you switch to an electric setup, consider a PiD with a ramping feature. You'll be able to program the temperature increase accordingly. 

        Scorching Yeast adds quite a bit of, scorched yeast flavor. Which some distillers appreciate, and some say it tastes of cooked condom. Given what I know about condoms, I don't think I want to taste them, ever. 



        On Feb 24, 2012, at 2:41, "chem_engr_shiner" <thammon13@...> wrote:

         

        I searched high and low for the bubble clouding and came up empty handed so if someone could point me in the right direction I'd appreciate it. As far as the yeast goes Im not worried about the microbes themselves getting into my product only what could be created and carried over by possibly burning them. I am cooking on a stove top with the hopes of retrofitting a heating element or two in the future. Is there less of a chance of scorching the yeast with a propane setup?

      • chem_engr_shiner
        Makes sense to me.. Both the cause of scorching and the not wanting a cooked condom flavor in spirits.
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 24, 2012
          Makes sense to me.. Both the cause of scorching and the not wanting a cooked condom flavor in spirits.

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Fredrick Lee <fredrick@...> wrote:
          >
          > Direct firing your boiler distributes the heat along the entire bottom of the vessel. Elements often have a higher energy density and can scorch the suspended yeast, but so can direct firing if it is too hot. I use a direct fired boiler and try not to exceed 1.2°C heating increase per minute. If when you switch to an electric setup, consider a PiD with a ramping feature. You'll be able to program the temperature increase accordingly.
          >
          > Scorching Yeast adds quite a bit of, scorched yeast flavor. Which some distillers appreciate, and some say it tastes of cooked condom. Given what I know about condoms, I don't think I want to taste them, ever.
        • geoff burrows
          To Avoid scorching with an element use a smaller element. I use an 850 watt 240volt element in a 25 ltrs/5 gall. boiler and it ticks over nicely the whole
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 24, 2012
            To Avoid scorching with an element use a smaller element.  I use an 850 watt 240volt element in a 25 ltrs/5 gall. boiler and it ticks over nicely the whole run, after the inital heat up with it,  and a bigger 3 kilowatt (3000watt) element.
            Geoff
          • tgfoitwoods
            Everything said so far about yeast scorching is true and important, but in addition, you can buy low-energy-density electric elements and high-energy-density
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 25, 2012
              Everything said so far about yeast scorching is true and important, but in addition, you can buy low-energy-density electric elements and high-energy-density elements. The differences between them could be measured in Watts/cm^2. By that logic, a low-density 1kW element would be much larger in surface area than a high-density 1kW element.

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff burrows" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
              >
              > To Avoid scorching with an element use a smaller element. I use an 850 watt 240volt element in a 25 ltrs/5 gall. boiler and it ticks over nicely the whole run, after the inital heat up with it, and a bigger 3 kilowatt (3000watt) element.
              > Geoff
              >
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