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Re: [new_distillers] Re: Oak Chips

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  • kim decker
    ok i am confused do you place the whit oak chips in a carboy and let sit with your bourbon ? or how? and if so how long to get any sort of aging? thank you 
    Message 1 of 39 , Jan 23, 2012
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      ok i am confused do you place the whit oak chips in a carboy and let sit with your bourbon ? or how? and if so how long to get any sort of aging? thank you 

      ________________________________
      From: geoff burrows <jeffrey.burrows@...>
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, January 23, 2012 2:22 AM
      Subject: RE: [new_distillers] Re: Oak Chips


       
      Hi ML,
           All Bourbon barrels
      are only ever used once and the oak of choice is white oak.  There is a very good reason for this;
      the wood grain on white oak is very dense and over time keeps most of the spirit
      inside with very little seepage as opposed to red oak whose grain is very wide
      apart you can actually suck water up out of a glass through the end grain, it is
      so porous.  
           If you were to fill a
      red oak barrel (if you could ever find one) with your spirit it would very
      quickly seep out through the barrel walls and I’m talking days here (the angels
      would be very happy with you, and with their share). 
           Your spirit would turn
      a sickly looking pink/red colour, the flavour profile and I say that word very
      loosely would have a frigging awful bitter acrid taste.  Have you ever sanded a red oak table
      without a mask and the dust that catches your throat and mouth is Gawd damned
      disgusting.  
           My prescription was a
      mask for the wife and a couple of beers for me but it all sorta went tits up and
      I was wearing the beer when I set the wet glass on the table and told her she
      had missed a bit.  As Harry says
      don’t use red oak near your hooch.  It’s bad MoJo look what happened to me and it was only a beer lol
       Geoff  
    • M L
      Thanks Tomhawk, This is great info. I had thought of wood chips sold for flavoring meat ng but the ones I found were hickory and didn t think that wood would
      Message 39 of 39 , Jan 25, 2012
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        Thanks Tomhawk, This is great info. I had thought of wood chips sold for flavoring meat ng but the ones I found were hickory and didn't think that wood would give the desired results.And  I would have to pay shipping on the wine brewing chips anyway and I've read that the wood from old whiskey barrels is the most desirable for flavoring homemade spirits .ML

        --- On Wed, 1/25/12, Tom <tomhawk412@...> wrote:

        From: Tom <tomhawk412@...>
        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Oak Chips
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, January 25, 2012, 4:26 AM

         

        ML,

        Oak chips, beans (cubes), spiral rods, etc. from wine making shops are a little too expensive for my use. In the absence of a few staves from an old whiskey barrel you might try Jack Daniels smoking chips. The chips are from Jack Daniels whiskey barrels (previously used) and are sold in bags of 3 pounds or so for $6.00 or there abouts. I have used them straight out of the bag and I have also toasted some to almost full char using a torch. The chips are readily available in Southern States of the U.S. during the spring and summer months and can be ordered from Cabellas or Bass Pro Shops. Just do a search for Jack Daniels wood chips. Try this link. http://www.basspro.com/Jack-Daniel-s-Wood-Smoking-Chips/product/104696/117943?hvarAID=shopping_googlebase&om_mmc=shopping_googlebase

        Unfortunately, the cost of shipping eats into the financial advantage.

        Tom

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, M L <kekedog13@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well since I started this whole conversation about oak , my findings are this.Since my stack of fire wood is red oak , (no good for consumables), and since I've been told that lumber yard oak is treated with a chemical during drying, and a whiskey barrel in a little out of my meager income range (sad , I know) I think my best potion is to buy oak that is made for brewing (mostly for use in wine). It can be had for quite reasonable prices. For instance , 8 oz. of medium toast American oak for $5.40 from Home Brew Heaven. Or 1 lb. or American oak chips for $ 3.20 from Home Brew for Less.And 2 oz. of American oak cubes fer $1.65 from Home Brewers Outpost just to name a few. These are only a few examples . These places offer all sorts of different types of oak, American, French , and Hungarian. And in different levels of toast. Also in different forms like chips , cubes, and a spiral cut, spring looking piece that would be real easy to use.The description of
        > these tell what effect they will have to the flavor of whatever you use them on, which is helpful in choosing which one you may want to try. Of course they could also be had from about any home brew supply store if you are lucky enough to have on nearby. ML
        >
        > --- On Mon, 1/23/12, tgfoitwoods <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
        >
        > From: tgfoitwoods <zymurgybob@...>
        > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Oak Chips
        > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Monday, January 23, 2012, 6:47 PM
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        > You're welcome.
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        > When I first tried oak aging, I bought a piece of white oak from some yuppy woodworking shop in Beaverton, Oregon. Because I was just learning, I can't tell you accurately how it turned out, but sticker shock almost killed me. After that I bought the planter at the local feed store and never looked back. I think the piece of what I'd call scrap cost more than the half-barrel.
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        > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits
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        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, M L <kekedog13@> wrote:
        > >
        > > ZB, Thanks for the good advise.Think I'll start looking for places that sell the half barrels for gardens and see if they have any damaged ones that I can get a couple of staves from. One guy said to not use white oak or any wood from a lumber yard due to chemicals used in the curing process.ML
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