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Re: Specialty malts for whisky

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  • baddriver13
    Hi Alex, Does this webpage help any? http://www.beersmith.com/grain-list/ The R/H column shows the recommended max amount of each specific
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 31, 2011
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      Hi Alex,
      Does this webpage help any?

      http://www.beersmith.com/grain-list/

      The R/H column shows the 'recommended' max amount of each specific fermentable/adjunct that should be used in a recipe.

      Also try this... http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter12-1.html

      Apologies if I've misconstrued your question.

      HNY!
    • Alex Castillo
      Thanks, Both are excellent links, now I know the approx. amounts of them to use. But also I´m confused. If they only provide unfermentable sugars, which
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 1, 2012
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        Thanks,

        Both are excellent links, now I know the approx. amounts of them to use. But also I´m confused. If they only provide unfermentable sugars, which means only flavor, will those flavors carry during distillation? which also tells me that, on the contrary of scotch or irish systems of double and triple distillation respectively, I´d go for a simple (one round), pot still, distillation in order to try to capture those flavors.

        Alex
      • Fredrick Lee
        Actually, specialty grains and adjuncts provide different amounts of fermentable sugars, depending on the type and mash temperature(s). It s not as simple as
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 1, 2012
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          Actually, specialty grains and adjuncts provide different amounts of fermentable sugars, depending on the type and mash temperature(s).   It's not as simple as saying "Crystal 60L" will add 1.042 points of fermentable. Not only does the amount of starch (and sugar) depend on the type of malt,  the amount of fermentable sugar depends highly on the mash temp and ph.  

          Lower mashing temps (about 147-149°F) will result in more fermentables (immediately available). 

          Either way, you can further treat the wort with enzymes or bacteria to get a full conversion, even when there's considerable amounts of non fermentable sugars.       

          On Jan 1, 2012, at 18:43, "Alex Castillo" <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:

           

          Thanks,

          Both are excellent links, now I know the approx. amounts of them to use. But also I´m confused. If they only provide unfermentable sugars, which means only flavor, will those flavors carry during distillation? which also tells me that, on the contrary of scotch or irish systems of double and triple distillation respectively, I´d go for a simple (one round), pot still, distillation in order to try to capture those flavors.

          Alex

        • tgfoitwoods
          Alex, Fredrick is right on with what he says about how much of your starches will convert and ferment, In the case of the Strong Scotch Ale recipe I gave you,
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 2, 2012
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            Alex,

            Fredrick is right on with what he says about how much of your starches will convert and ferment, In the case of the Strong Scotch Ale recipe I gave you, I mash at a higher temperature, because I want more starch left as malto-dextrins in the beer, for richness and mouthfeel. I'm not sure that there's much correlation between residual unfermentable sugars and flavor through the still, though. I do know that the specialty Munton's peated malt I have used in past scotch batches give the most pronounced flavor note in the distillate, that being the peat smoke note.

            As for flavor, I may be the wrong person to ask, because my spirits are always lighter in flavor than I'd wish for. I have a new still under construction that may fix that, though.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller Making Fine Spirits

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Fredrick Lee <fredrick@...> wrote:
            >
            > Actually, specialty grains and adjuncts provide different amounts of fermentable sugars, depending on the type and mash temperature(s). It's not as simple as saying "Crystal 60L" will add 1.042 points of fermentable. Not only does the amount of starch (and sugar) depend on the type of malt, the amount of fermentable sugar depends highly on the mash temp and ph.
            >
            > Lower mashing temps (about 147-149°F) will result in more fermentables (immediately available).
            >
            > Either way, you can further treat the wort with enzymes or bacteria to get a full conversion, even when there's considerable amounts of non fermentable sugars.
            >

          • Alex Castillo
            Thank you both Frederick and Z.B. for your info, as always, very important. Welp, I just ordered what will become my first grain bill for an Special irish
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 2, 2012
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              Thank you both Frederick and Z.B. for your info, as always, very important.

              Welp, I just ordered what will become my first grain bill for an "Special irish single malt". The grain bill will go as follows for a 5 gallons mash:

              2-row: 8 lbs.;
              honey malt: 1 pound;
              caramel 60L: 0.5 lb.
              chocolate malt: 0.5 lb.

              How does it look?

              Also a (distilled to be) braggot with: honey: 1 gallon + DME 3 lbs.

              tasty huh?

              Finally I´m getting good results with rice and I´ll pull for a dominico-american version of that grain whisky with som rye for a change (and 6-row)

              But I´m curious ZB, how did your sex-in-a-glass-canadian honey malt finally resulted? thinking in 7 pounds of it + 1 pound of 6-row (for conversion) + 1 lb. peated malt + caramel and chocolate (0.5 lb. of each) for a scotch change (don´t you just love it?)

              What was your bill?

              Finally about license for distilling in US (a topic I followed with interest, how much money will be the minimum needed to just start? in the article Wal sent the link, they say US$ 10,000, but I think they´re falling short).

              Waiting for your answers, while sipping Talisker; oh Scotland, the things you make me do!

              A!
            • Fredrick Lee
              Looks tasty. Probably make a wonderful ale. ... Looks tasty. Probably make a wonderful ale. On Jan 2, 2012, at 17:02, Alex Castillo
              Message 6 of 16 , Jan 2, 2012
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                Looks tasty. Probably make a wonderful ale. 

                On Jan 2, 2012, at 17:02, "Alex Castillo" <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:

                 



                Thank you both Frederick and Z.B. for your info, as always, very important.

                Welp, I just ordered what will become my first grain bill for an "Special irish single malt". The grain bill will go as follows for a 5 gallons mash:

                2-row: 8 lbs.;
                honey malt: 1 pound;
                caramel 60L: 0.5 lb.
                chocolate malt: 0.5 lb.

                How does it look?

                Also a (distilled to be) braggot with: honey: 1 gallon + DME 3 lbs.

                tasty huh?

                Finally I´m getting good results with rice and I´ll pull for a dominico-american version of that grain whisky with som rye for a change (and 6-row)

                But I´m curious ZB, how did your sex-in-a-glass-canadian honey malt finally resulted? thinking in 7 pounds of it + 1 pound of 6-row (for conversion) + 1 lb. peated malt + caramel and chocolate (0.5 lb. of each) for a scotch change (don´t you just love it?)

                What was your bill?

                Finally about license for distilling in US (a topic I followed with interest, how much money will be the minimum needed to just start? in the article Wal sent the link, they say US$ 10,000, but I think they´re falling short).

                Waiting for your answers, while sipping Talisker; oh Scotland, the things you make me do!

                A!

              • tgfoitwoods
                ... important. ... Special irish single malt . The grain bill will go as follows for a 5 ... I m guessing you ll find it to be a very nice ale. ...
                Message 7 of 16 , Jan 3, 2012
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                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Alex Castillo" <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thank you both Frederick and Z.B. for your info, as always, very important.
                  >
                  > Welp, I just ordered what will become my first grain bill for an "Special irish single malt". The grain bill will go as follows for a 5 gallons mash:
                  >
                  > 2-row: 8 lbs.;
                  > honey malt: 1 pound;
                  > caramel 60L: 0.5 lb.
                  > chocolate malt: 0.5 lb.
                  >
                  > How does it look?

                  I'm guessing you'll find it to be a very nice ale.

                  >
                  > Also a (distilled to be) braggot with: honey: 1 gallon + DME 3 lbs.
                  >
                  > tasty huh?
                  >
                  > Finally I´m getting good results with rice and I´ll pull for a dominico-american version of that grain whisky with som rye for a change (and 6-row)
                  >
                  > But I´m curious ZB, how did your sex-in-a-glass-canadian honey malt finally resulted? thinking in 7 pounds of it + 1 pound of 6-row (for conversion) + 1 lb. peated malt + caramel and chocolate (0.5 lb. of each) for a scotch change (don´t you just love it?)
                  >
                  > What was your bill?

                  Sorry, Alex, but I think I was confusing. I've actually tasted an un-named single malt that I think I can get close to with  Canadian Honey Malt, but I have yet to try to make it. It's all a pipe-dream for now.

                  >
                  > Finally about license for distilling in US (a topic I followed with interest, how much money will be the minimum needed to just start? in the article Wal sent the link, they say US$ 10,000, but I think they´re falling short).
                  >
                  > Waiting for your answers, while sipping Talisker; oh Scotland, the things you make me do!
                  >
                  > A!
                  >
                • Alex Castillo
                  ... Got it! I think Aberfeldy has some honey notes, and when I´ve mixed chivas with orange juice I have discovered for my surprise a nice honey flavor, (but
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 3, 2012
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                    >
                    > Sorry, Alex, but I think I was confusing. I've actually tasted an
                    > un-named single malt that I think I can get close to with Canadian
                    > Honey Malt, but I have yet to try to make it. It's all a pipe-dream for
                    > now.
                    > >

                    Got it! I think Aberfeldy has some honey notes, and when I´ve mixed chivas with orange juice I have discovered for my surprise a nice honey flavor, (but as we know chivas is not a single malt).

                    Alex
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