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Re: [new_distillers] Re: sorghum rum batches

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  • Chris Jude
    Alex, Sorry I wasn t more clear. I m using the juice from Sweet Sorghum, which is used to make Sorghum Syrup, similar to molasses from Sugar Cane. I m not
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 4, 2011
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      Alex,
      Sorry I wasn't more clear.  I'm using the juice from Sweet Sorghum, which is used to make Sorghum Syrup, similar to molasses from Sugar Cane.  I'm not using the grain.  So I would call this sorghum rum.



      On Sun, Dec 4, 2011 at 8:15 PM, Alex Castillo <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
       


      Probably the term "rum" for sorghum (which is a grain) is not very apropriate; instead, probably whiskey matches better.

      Alex


    • Alex Castillo
      Again Chris, that´s not rum. You need molasses or sugar cane juice to called it rum. Please check the following link, this people just do what you want.
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 5, 2011
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        Again Chris, that´s not rum. You need molasses or sugar cane juice to called it rum. Please check the following link, this people just do what you want.

        http://madisondistillery.com/Queen_Jennie.html

        Alex
      • Chris Jude
        Thanks for the link Alex, Madison Distillery looks pretty great. I m not intending to start a naming conventions thread, but calling this product whiskey
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 5, 2011
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          Thanks for the link Alex, Madison Distillery looks pretty great.
          I'm not intending to start a naming conventions thread, but calling this product whiskey doesn't make sense to me.  
          Whiskey is made from grains, and what I'm making is from the juice of a crushed grass, very similar to sugar cane.  I'm not trying to say that it is rum, but it's much more like rum than a whiskey.
          Actually, it's interesting to me that there isn't a tradition of making liquor from sorghum cane in the southeast.  We know there were plenty of stills, and plenty of folks making sorghum syrup.

          Anyway, i'd be interested in if anyone has some input on my original questions, about the heat and spiciness of the distillate.  I've also noticed at certain parts of the run a blue cloudiness in the product.  It tends to go away between jars.

          thanks

          On Mon, Dec 5, 2011 at 5:36 PM, Alex Castillo <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
           

          Again Chris, that´s not rum. You need molasses or sugar cane juice to called it rum. Please check the following link, this people just do what you want.

          http://madisondistillery.com/Queen_Jennie.html

          Alex


        • geoff burrows
          Hi Chris, If you re looking names here s one The French way to spell Rum is : Le Rhume with an h in the middle of it So you could call it : Sorgrhume ? or
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 5, 2011
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            Hi Chris,
            If you're looking names here's one
            The French way to spell Rum is : Le Rhume with an "h" in the middle of it 
            So you could call it : Sorgrhume ? or  Le Rhume de Sorg 
            You are more or less saying it's the rum of the sorghum
            It looks and sounds real fancy on a bottle
            And I think it would read really good labeled up like that
                                               
                                               Le Rhume de Sorg
          • hugh harnett
            Hi Chris, I am really intrigued by the sorghum syrup, do you grow the sorghum yourself? The varieties we grow here in South Africa, are a lot shorter than the
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 5, 2011
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              Hi Chris,

              I am really intrigued by the sorghum syrup, do you grow the sorghum yourself?

              The varieties we grow here in South Africa, are a lot shorter than the pictures I saw when I googled sorghum syrup. If you are growing it yourself, what variety of sorghum are you using?

              Thanks

              Hugh

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Jude <vegbenz300@...> wrote:
            • waljaco
              The closest relative of sugarcane is sorghum, from which sugarcane ancestors may have diverged only 5 million years ago. Sweet sorghum has some advantages
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 6, 2011
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                "The closest relative of sugarcane is sorghum, from which sugarcane ancestors may have diverged only 5 million years ago."

                Sweet sorghum has some advantages over sugarcane for ethanol production, unless you live in a high rainfall area.

                Rumbullion perhaps?
                wal


                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Alex Castillo" <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
                >
                > Again Chris, that´s not rum. You need molasses or sugar cane juice to called it rum. Please check the following link, this people just do what you want.
                >
                > http://madisondistillery.com/Queen_Jennie.html
                >
                > Alex
                >
              • Jim Haller
                I lived in China for most of three years and was introduced to their whiskey made from sorghum. Check out the website for more history
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 6, 2011
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                  I lived in China for most of three years and was introduced to their “whiskey” made from sorghum.  Check out the website for more history (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maotai ). Although they call it a wine, it is definitely a distilled spirit.  I have one bottle of Maotai at home that is 68% abv. This is what they traditionally use to toast each other during special dinners with friends and tend to do way too many toasts. It is very strong and has an aftertaste that will stay with you for several days.  I hope your venture produces a product free from these strong, lingering flavors.

                   

                • Chris Jude
                  Yes, we grow the sorghum, harvest and crush the cane stalks to get the juice. Most of it we cook down to Sorghum Syrup, and some of the juice we ferment.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 6, 2011
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                    Yes, we grow the sorghum, harvest and crush the cane stalks to get the juice.  Most of it we cook down to Sorghum Syrup, and some of the juice we ferment.  This year we grew Dale and Sugar Drip, both older varieties.  The cane is typically from 12-16 feet tall, and about 1-2" in diameter.  We use an old, tractor pto belt powered three roller press to crush the juice, and a large stainless evaporator pan to cook the syrup.
                    Here is a good source for seeds:



                    On Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 1:57 AM, hugh harnett <hugh.harnett@...> wrote:
                     

                    Hi Chris,

                    I am really intrigued by the sorghum syrup, do you grow the sorghum yourself?

                    The varieties we grow here in South Africa, are a lot shorter than the pictures I saw when I googled sorghum syrup. If you are growing it yourself, what variety of sorghum are you using?

                    Thanks

                    Hugh



                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Jude <vegbenz300@...> wrote:


                  • hugh harnett
                    Thanks Chris, Looking forward to making sorghum rum next year!
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 7, 2011
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                      Thanks Chris,

                      Looking forward to making sorghum rum next year!


                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Jude <vegbenz300@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Yes, we grow the sorghum, harvest and crush the cane stalks to get the
                      > juice. Most of it we cook down to Sorghum Syrup, and some of the juice we
                      > ferment. This year we grew Dale and Sugar Drip, both older varieties. The
                      > cane is typically from 12-16 feet tall, and about 1-2" in diameter. We use
                      > an old, tractor pto belt powered three roller press to crush the juice, and
                      > a large stainless evaporator pan to cook the syrup.
                      > Here is a good source for seeds:
                      > http://www.southernexposure.com/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_description=1&zenid=2jbj53nenq2e19fkmv2v52qs15&keyword=sorghum
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On Tue, Dec 6, 2011 at 1:57 AM, hugh harnett <hugh.harnett@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > **
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Hi Chris,
                      > >
                      > > I am really intrigued by the sorghum syrup, do you grow the sorghum
                      > > yourself?
                      > >
                      > > The varieties we grow here in South Africa, are a lot shorter than the
                      > > pictures I saw when I googled sorghum syrup. If you are growing it
                      > > yourself, what variety of sorghum are you using?
                      > >
                      > > Thanks
                      > >
                      > > Hugh
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Chris Jude <vegbenz300@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
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