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Storing Wash (Beer) Before A Stripping Run

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  • Tom
    To One and All, The recent exchange about ways to keep backset free from spoilage between runs begs a question regarding something that I am doing. I am
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 8, 2011
      To One and All,

      The recent exchange about ways to keep backset free from spoilage between runs begs a question regarding something that I am doing.

      I am working on a corn, rye, and malted barley whiskey. I am making 5 gallon batches. Once a batch has fermented to dry, I let it settle, rack it and add Super-Kleer KC. After the remaining solids settle out, I rack it again and store it in a glass carboy in my refrigerator at 40 degrees F. I have two carboys stored in that manner and have the third batch working. My intention was to finish the three batches, combine them for one stripping run, followed by a spirit run.

      This seemed logical to me. I store wine and beer in a similar, refrigerated manner. Am I making a mistake? My intent was to accumulate enough wash to make one large run as a time saving measure. Hauling my equipment from the basement up to my garage for a run is a lot of work. Making one large stripping run rather than three small ones seems to be very logical.

      The first batch will have been stored in the refrigerator for about four weeks by the time the last batch of wash is finished and ready to run.

      I sure hope I haven't made a mistake.

      Tom
    • Ric Cunningham
      As a home brewer that stores lots of fermented beer for long periods I can tell you that you are fine with this approach. Refrigeration is not required but
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 8, 2011
        As a home brewer that stores lots of fermented beer for long periods I can tell you that you are fine with this approach. Refrigeration is not required but will aid in the clearing with or without a fining agent. 

        On Sat, Oct 8, 2011 at 8:09 PM, Tom <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
         

        To One and All,

        The recent exchange about ways to keep backset free from spoilage between runs begs a question regarding something that I am doing.

        I am working on a corn, rye, and malted barley whiskey. I am making 5 gallon batches. Once a batch has fermented to dry, I let it settle, rack it and add Super-Kleer KC. After the remaining solids settle out, I rack it again and store it in a glass carboy in my refrigerator at 40 degrees F. I have two carboys stored in that manner and have the third batch working. My intention was to finish the three batches, combine them for one stripping run, followed by a spirit run.

        This seemed logical to me. I store wine and beer in a similar, refrigerated manner. Am I making a mistake? My intent was to accumulate enough wash to make one large run as a time saving measure. Hauling my equipment from the basement up to my garage for a run is a lot of work. Making one large stripping run rather than three small ones seems to be very logical.

        The first batch will have been stored in the refrigerator for about four weeks by the time the last batch of wash is finished and ready to run.

        I sure hope I haven't made a mistake.

        Tom




        --
        If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
      • Tom
        Ric, That s a relief! I thought all along that what I was doing would be acceptable. However, I began to worry after reading about spoilage of backset. My
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 9, 2011
          Ric,

          That's a relief! I thought all along that what I was doing would be acceptable. However, I began to worry after reading about spoilage of backset. My experience with beer and wine has shown that refrigerated storage is acceptable but I'm new to whiskey making so I thought it best to go to the experienced folks for confirmation.

          Now I can go back to "work".

          Thanks,

          Tom

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ric Cunningham <wilypig@...> wrote:
          >
          > As a home brewer that stores lots of fermented beer for long periods I can
          > tell you that you are fine with this approach. Refrigeration is not required
          > but will aid in the clearing with or without a fining agent.
          >
          > On Sat, Oct 8, 2011 at 8:09 PM, Tom <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > To One and All,
          > >
          > > The recent exchange about ways to keep backset free from spoilage between
          > > runs begs a question regarding something that I am doing.
          > >
          > > I am working on a corn, rye, and malted barley whiskey. I am making 5
          > > gallon batches. Once a batch has fermented to dry, I let it settle, rack it
          > > and add Super-Kleer KC. After the remaining solids settle out, I rack it
          > > again and store it in a glass carboy in my refrigerator at 40 degrees F. I
          > > have two carboys stored in that manner and have the third batch working. My
          > > intention was to finish the three batches, combine them for one stripping
          > > run, followed by a spirit run.
          > >
          > > This seemed logical to me. I store wine and beer in a similar, refrigerated
          > > manner. Am I making a mistake? My intent was to accumulate enough wash to
          > > make one large run as a time saving measure. Hauling my equipment from the
          > > basement up to my garage for a run is a lot of work. Making one large
          > > stripping run rather than three small ones seems to be very logical.
          > >
          > > The first batch will have been stored in the refrigerator for about four
          > > weeks by the time the last batch of wash is finished and ready to run.
          > >
          > > I sure hope I haven't made a mistake.
          > >
          > > Tom
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
          >
        • olrgernr
          another question. when the first run is complete, do I combine the fents with the mash for the second run or wait until i have enough to run just the alcohol?
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 11, 2011
            another question. when the first run is complete, do I combine the fents with the mash for the second run or wait until i have enough to run just the alcohol? Probably some pretty basic questions but can't seem to get all of terms sorted.

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
            >
            > Ric,
            >
            > That's a relief! I thought all along that what I was doing would be acceptable. However, I began to worry after reading about spoilage of backset. My experience with beer and wine has shown that refrigerated storage is acceptable but I'm new to whiskey making so I thought it best to go to the experienced folks for confirmation.
            >
            > Now I can go back to "work".
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Tom
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ric Cunningham <wilypig@> wrote:
            > >
            > > As a home brewer that stores lots of fermented beer for long periods I can
            > > tell you that you are fine with this approach. Refrigeration is not required
            > > but will aid in the clearing with or without a fining agent.
            > >
            > > On Sat, Oct 8, 2011 at 8:09 PM, Tom <tomhawk412@> wrote:
            > >
            > > > **
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > To One and All,
            > > >
            > > > The recent exchange about ways to keep backset free from spoilage between
            > > > runs begs a question regarding something that I am doing.
            > > >
            > > > I am working on a corn, rye, and malted barley whiskey. I am making 5
            > > > gallon batches. Once a batch has fermented to dry, I let it settle, rack it
            > > > and add Super-Kleer KC. After the remaining solids settle out, I rack it
            > > > again and store it in a glass carboy in my refrigerator at 40 degrees F. I
            > > > have two carboys stored in that manner and have the third batch working. My
            > > > intention was to finish the three batches, combine them for one stripping
            > > > run, followed by a spirit run.
            > > >
            > > > This seemed logical to me. I store wine and beer in a similar, refrigerated
            > > > manner. Am I making a mistake? My intent was to accumulate enough wash to
            > > > make one large run as a time saving measure. Hauling my equipment from the
            > > > basement up to my garage for a run is a lot of work. Making one large
            > > > stripping run rather than three small ones seems to be very logical.
            > > >
            > > > The first batch will have been stored in the refrigerator for about four
            > > > weeks by the time the last batch of wash is finished and ready to run.
            > > >
            > > > I sure hope I haven't made a mistake.
            > > >
            > > > Tom
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --
            > > If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
            > >
            >
          • olrgernr
            another question. when the first run is complete, do I combine the fents with the mash for the second run or wait until i have enough to run just the alcohol?
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 11, 2011
              another question. when the first run is complete, do I combine the fents with the mash for the second run or wait until i have enough to run just the alcohol? Probably some pretty basic questions but can't seem to get all of terms sorted.

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
              >
              > Ric,
              >
              > That's a relief! I thought all along that what I was doing would be acceptable. However, I began to worry after reading about spoilage of backset. My experience with beer and wine has shown that refrigerated storage is acceptable but I'm new to whiskey making so I thought it best to go to the experienced folks for confirmation.
              >
              > Now I can go back to "work".
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > Tom
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ric Cunningham <wilypig@> wrote:
              > >
              > > As a home brewer that stores lots of fermented beer for long periods I can
              > > tell you that you are fine with this approach. Refrigeration is not required
              > > but will aid in the clearing with or without a fining agent.
              > >
              > > On Sat, Oct 8, 2011 at 8:09 PM, Tom <tomhawk412@> wrote:
              > >
              > > > **
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > To One and All,
              > > >
              > > > The recent exchange about ways to keep backset free from spoilage between
              > > > runs begs a question regarding something that I am doing.
              > > >
              > > > I am working on a corn, rye, and malted barley whiskey. I am making 5
              > > > gallon batches. Once a batch has fermented to dry, I let it settle, rack it
              > > > and add Super-Kleer KC. After the remaining solids settle out, I rack it
              > > > again and store it in a glass carboy in my refrigerator at 40 degrees F. I
              > > > have two carboys stored in that manner and have the third batch working. My
              > > > intention was to finish the three batches, combine them for one stripping
              > > > run, followed by a spirit run.
              > > >
              > > > This seemed logical to me. I store wine and beer in a similar, refrigerated
              > > > manner. Am I making a mistake? My intent was to accumulate enough wash to
              > > > make one large run as a time saving measure. Hauling my equipment from the
              > > > basement up to my garage for a run is a lot of work. Making one large
              > > > stripping run rather than three small ones seems to be very logical.
              > > >
              > > > The first batch will have been stored in the refrigerator for about four
              > > > weeks by the time the last batch of wash is finished and ready to run.
              > > >
              > > > I sure hope I haven't made a mistake.
              > > >
              > > > Tom
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --
              > > If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
              > >
              >
            • J
              Is your first run a stripping run or are you talking about heads and tails from a reflux run? if it is heads and tails and you are running single reflux runs
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 12, 2011
                Is your first run a stripping run or are you talking about heads and tails from a reflux run? if it is heads and tails and you are running single reflux runs to get finished product, then just add them to the mash for the next run. That's what I usually do.

                If you are doing stripping runs with a pot still and re-running that distillate for finished product, hold on to it till you have enough for a full run alone. That's also what I do, sometimes.

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "olrgernr" <olrgernr@...> wrote:
                >
                > another question. when the first run is complete, do I combine the fents with the mash for the second run or wait until i have enough to run just the alcohol? Probably some pretty basic questions but can't seem to get all of terms sorted.
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Ric,
                > >
                > > That's a relief! I thought all along that what I was doing would be acceptable. However, I began to worry after reading about spoilage of backset. My experience with beer and wine has shown that refrigerated storage is acceptable but I'm new to whiskey making so I thought it best to go to the experienced folks for confirmation.
                > >
                > > Now I can go back to "work".
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > >
                > > Tom
                > >
                > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ric Cunningham <wilypig@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > As a home brewer that stores lots of fermented beer for long periods I can
                > > > tell you that you are fine with this approach. Refrigeration is not required
                > > > but will aid in the clearing with or without a fining agent.
                > > >
                > > > On Sat, Oct 8, 2011 at 8:09 PM, Tom <tomhawk412@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > > **
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > To One and All,
                > > > >
                > > > > The recent exchange about ways to keep backset free from spoilage between
                > > > > runs begs a question regarding something that I am doing.
                > > > >
                > > > > I am working on a corn, rye, and malted barley whiskey. I am making 5
                > > > > gallon batches. Once a batch has fermented to dry, I let it settle, rack it
                > > > > and add Super-Kleer KC. After the remaining solids settle out, I rack it
                > > > > again and store it in a glass carboy in my refrigerator at 40 degrees F. I
                > > > > have two carboys stored in that manner and have the third batch working. My
                > > > > intention was to finish the three batches, combine them for one stripping
                > > > > run, followed by a spirit run.
                > > > >
                > > > > This seemed logical to me. I store wine and beer in a similar, refrigerated
                > > > > manner. Am I making a mistake? My intent was to accumulate enough wash to
                > > > > make one large run as a time saving measure. Hauling my equipment from the
                > > > > basement up to my garage for a run is a lot of work. Making one large
                > > > > stripping run rather than three small ones seems to be very logical.
                > > > >
                > > > > The first batch will have been stored in the refrigerator for about four
                > > > > weeks by the time the last batch of wash is finished and ready to run.
                > > > >
                > > > > I sure hope I haven't made a mistake.
                > > > >
                > > > > Tom
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --
                > > > If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
                > > >
                > >
                >
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