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Re: Backset

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  • olrgernr
    thanks thought there had to be a way to spread out the runs. I am working on may first pot and hope to be able to try it out in a couple of weeks. I think I
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 7, 2011
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      thanks
      thought there had to be a way to spread out the runs. I am working on may first pot and hope to be able to try it out in a couple of weeks. I think I am starting to get a clear picture of the process
      rnr

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Jerry McCullough <jkmccull@...> wrote:
      >
      > below is a copy of the reply:
      >  Re: Backset
      >
      >
      > Yes,
      >
      > If left out, it will get
      > infected with bacteria, which is desirable in
      > making aged dunder for rum, but
      > not for making a sour mash for whiskey.
      > After it cools from distillation, I
      > will refrigerate it or if not using
      > for a while, will even freeze it to keep
      > it clean.
      >
      > JB. aka Waldo.
      >
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com,
      > Jerry McCullough <jkmccull@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Does backset
      > have a shelf life?
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: olrgernr <olrgernr@...>
      > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Thursday, October 6, 2011 9:37 PM
      > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Backset
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      > Was there ever an answer to "does backset have a shelf life? Can it be stored (sealed, refrigerated etc) for any amount of time? If I can't keep mash going continuously do i always have to do 2 runs back to back or can i wait a week or two between runs?
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Jerry McCullough <jkmccull@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Does backset have a shelf life?
      > >
      > > --- On Tue, 3/15/11, jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@>
      > > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Backset
      > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Tuesday, March 15, 2011, 7:26 AM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Never had that problem. How are you sparging your mash? If its that
      > > thick, im surprised your not burning it. Try using a straining bag - 5
      > > gallon paint strainers work well. I also let the backset sit for a few
      > > days to help separate any solids in it.
      > >
      > > JB. aka Waldo.
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gavinflett" <gavin_flett@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I have decided to try using backset for mashing. Can anyone tell me
      > > what I am doing wrong when I am using backset for my mash? Almost
      > > immediately after I distill I use the already heated backset for
      > > mashing. I have done this twice and twice I have ended up with what I
      > > can only refer to as uncured cement and very little if any mash
      > > draining.
      > > >
      > > > Do I need to mill the grain to a coarser grind when using backset. I
      > > did notice that backset is consideraby stickier and thicker than water.
      > > Plus when I let it settle I also notice that there is still solids in
      > > the backset that I could not remove from the mash.
      > > >
      > > > Someone with backset experience please enlighten me, waiting 16 hrs
      > > for a mash to sparge should not be happening.
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • jkmccull
      I am in the process of distilling blackberry brandy. I used about 8 gallons of concentrated blackberry juice, two gallons of water, enough sugar to have a
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 26, 2014
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        I am in the process of distilling blackberry brandy. I used about 8 gallons of concentrated blackberry juice, two gallons of water, enough sugar to have a potential alcohol content of 12% and pitched EC-1118 yeast. I also had a bag of about 6 pounds of crushed berries in the must. I forgot to add yeast nutrients and a few other things. Call it a senior moment. I have fermented blackberry juice, water and sugar and I am sad to say that I ended up with a stuck ferment. Nothing I did would restart the ferment so I decided to go ahead and distill the must.  The final SG indicates that I still had about 5%  potential alcohol. Hindsight says that maybe I should have diluted the blackberry juice with more water and fermented in two batches instead of one.  


        Anyhow I was thinking that after I distill the must, I could adjust the backset ph back to 5.5 or so, add more sugar, water, the trub from the current batch, yeast nutrients and do a second ferment. My logic is that the blackberry juice is so concentrated and I still have the bag of crushed blackberries that there should be plenty of congers left to make a second batch. This time I would not make the mistake of leaving out the nutrients and other items to finish the ferment.


        Is there anything wrong with this plan? 

      • Paulo Jurza
        I have distilled this rest once and the final product ended up with cardboard-wet-dog smell. My intent was to save some alcohol of the rest, but I didnt find
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 26, 2014
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          I have distilled this rest once and the final product ended up with cardboard-wet-dog smell. My intent was to save some alcohol of the rest, but I didnt find any advantage on it.

          Jurza
          Brasil

          Em 26/12/2014 12:59, "jkmccull@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> escreveu:
           

          I am in the process of distilling blackberry brandy. I used about 8 gallons of concentrated blackberry juice, two gallons of water, enough sugar to have a potential alcohol content of 12% and pitched EC-1118 yeast. I also had a bag of about 6 pounds of crushed berries in the must. I forgot to add yeast nutrients and a few other things. Call it a senior moment. I have fermented blackberry juice, water and sugar and I am sad to say that I ended up with a stuck ferment. Nothing I did would restart the ferment so I decided to go ahead and distill the must.  The final SG indicates that I still had about 5%  potential alcohol. Hindsight says that maybe I should have diluted the blackberry juice with more water and fermented in two batches instead of one.  


          Anyhow I was thinking that after I distill the must, I could adjust the backset ph back to 5.5 or so, add more sugar, water, the trub from the current batch, yeast nutrients and do a second ferment. My logic is that the blackberry juice is so concentrated and I still have the bag of crushed blackberries that there should be plenty of congers left to make a second batch. This time I would not make the mistake of leaving out the nutrients and other items to finish the ferment.


          Is there anything wrong with this plan? 

        • Jim Graves
          I too have had problems with stuck fermentation while using 1118 yeast.  Sooooo, I quit using the 1118 and started using regular old bakers yeast and happy to
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 26, 2014
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            I too have had problems with stuck fermentation while using 1118 yeast.  Sooooo, I quit using the 1118 and started using regular old bakers yeast and happy to say, I have not had another problem.  I do a lot of grapes, crush and then put the crush into a vat, add sugar, water yeast and neutrients and off it goes!!!!  Makes great grappa!


            On Friday, December 26, 2014 1:09 PM, "Paulo Jurza paulo.jurza@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


             
            I have distilled this rest once and the final product ended up with cardboard-wet-dog smell. My intent was to save some alcohol of the rest, but I didnt find any advantage on it.
            Jurza
            Brasil
            Em 26/12/2014 12:59, "jkmccull@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> escreveu:
             
            I am in the process of distilling blackberry brandy. I used about 8 gallons of concentrated blackberry juice, two gallons of water, enough sugar to have a potential alcohol content of 12% and pitched EC-1118 yeast. I also had a bag of about 6 pounds of crushed berries in the must. I forgot to add yeast nutrients and a few other things. Call it a senior moment. I have fermented blackberry juice, water and sugar and I am sad to say that I ended up with a stuck ferment. Nothing I did would restart the ferment so I decided to go ahead and distill the must.  The final SG indicates that I still had about 5%  potential alcohol. Hindsight says that maybe I should have diluted the blackberry juice with more water and fermented in two batches instead of one.  

            Anyhow I was thinking that after I distill the must, I could adjust the backset ph back to 5.5 or so, add more sugar, water, the trub from the current batch, yeast nutrients and do a second ferment. My logic is that the blackberry juice is so concentrated and I still have the bag of crushed blackberries that there should be plenty of congers left to make a second batch. This time I would not make the mistake of leaving out the nutrients and other items to finish the ferment.

            Is there anything wrong with this plan? 


          • edbar44
            I do this very often because I start with very high OG of 1.130 or more using distillers yeast and the ferment dies at around 1.010 or a little lower but
            Message 5 of 16 , Dec 27, 2014
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              I do this very often because I start with very high OG of 1.130 or more using distillers yeast and the ferment dies at around 1.010 or a little lower but rarely makes it to the .980 range so I just use the backset and like you said adjust the pH because it is quite low, add my sugar and nutrients and off to the races again, have never had a problem and I'm making GNS
            • Jerry McCullough
              What chemical do you use to elevate the pH? Is there a formula I can use to calculate how much of that chemical I have to use to increase the pH of a known
              Message 6 of 16 , Dec 31, 2014
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                What chemical do you use to elevate the pH? Is there a formula I can use to calculate how much of that chemical I have to use to increase the pH of a known volume to a pH of 6?  

                Jerry McCullough


                On Saturday, December 27, 2014 10:28 AM, "edbar44@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                 
                I do this very often because I start with very high OG of 1.130 or more using distillers yeast and the ferment dies at around 1.010 or a little lower but rarely makes it to the .980 range so I just use the backset and like you said adjust the pH because it is quite low, add my sugar and nutrients and off to the races again, have never had a problem and I'm making GNS


              • John The Fatbloke
                Potassium carbonate. Formula ? Dunno. I just add it in small quantities, then test again....... On 31 Dec 2014 14:18, Jerry McCullough jkmccull@yahoo.com
                Message 7 of 16 , Dec 31, 2014
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                  Potassium carbonate. Formula ? Dunno. I just add it in small quantities, then test again.......

                  On 31 Dec 2014 14:18, "Jerry McCullough jkmccull@... [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                   

                  What chemical do you use to elevate the pH? Is there a formula I can use to calculate how much of that chemical I have to use to increase the pH of a known volume to a pH of 6?  

                  Jerry McCullough


                  On Saturday, December 27, 2014 10:28 AM, "edbar44@yahoo.com [new_distillers]" <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                   
                  I do this very often because I start with very high OG of 1.130 or more using distillers yeast and the ferment dies at around 1.010 or a little lower but rarely makes it to the .980 range so I just use the backset and like you said adjust the pH because it is quite low, add my sugar and nutrients and off to the races again, have never had a problem and I'm making GNS


                • edbar44
                  I use soda ash which is sodium carbonate and readily available.
                  Message 8 of 16 , Jan 3
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                    I use soda ash which is sodium carbonate and readily available.
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