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My 3 Week Whiskey VS Your 6 Month Whiskey

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  • bruich44
    It s pretty common advice by the movers and shakers of this forum that you need to age your Whiskey for 6 months or more for a perfect product. If I m going
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 14 7:04 PM
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      It's pretty common advice by the movers and shakers of this forum that you need to age your Whiskey for 6 months or more for a perfect product. If I'm going to improve my product, longer aging is the only variable I have left to play with.

      While relatively new to distilling I'm old to brewing and intimately familiar with most commercial Scotch and Bourbons (and that's an expensive statement!) and am proud of my 3 week Whiskey. Everyone that I've given some to has really enjoyed it and is shocked at its age. I just haven't found the motivation to age longer, but like everyone, I'm in pursuit of a more-perfect product.

      As my Whiskey gets to 6 weeks and 2 months, it's less enjoyable - more oak and color with no further smoothness or sweetness. My guess is either I do steps not taken by others, over-oak, or in aging, there's a lag period where my 3 week is excellent, 2 month is not, but 6 month is vastly superior... I've never gotten that far.

      I was hoping to quickly run through my process and if you do pretty much what I do, but don't enjoy your product until 6 months, then you are either pouring the most exquisite elixir ever distilled, or something else is amiss...


      30# grain (more or less) w/ yeast either ale or champagne
      Post-fermentation 12 gal (more or less) at 8% (more or less)
      Distilled and collected down to 10%

      Repeat above to get about 4 gal or so as low-wines

      Distill low-wines diluted to around 25%, collect foreshots, and the rest in separate containers 100-200mls. Wait 1-3 days.

      Cut by nose and taste. Collect only the most perfect jars in "center-cut" 1 gal glass jug. Collect the usable other jars in "outer-cut" 1 gal jug. Everything else dumped into "Feints" carboy. When you fill up 1 gal jugs (at 60-62%) continue to the next step...

      Take a heart-wood White Oak log from firewood pile (or used French Oak barrel) and turn it into around 1/2" square stock, around 6" long. Have 100 of these sitting on your shelf to further dry out in time. Take each "stave" and char the bejesus out of it with your Mapp Gas torch until it resembles nothing. Dunk it immediately in clean (RO) water until the sizzling stops and char it again. Dunk again and set aside and do another. When you get 8 sticks done, drop them in your 1 gal vessel, cork.

      Age for 3 weeks or more. Every other day, put in the freezer, and back on shelf. (I have 4 jugs going now, so now it's 1 day freezer, 3 days shelf per jug.)

      About 1x a week (more or less, say 3x total) take your .5 micron SS stone and bubble pure oxygen into the jug, about 30 seconds, more or less. Bubble enough oxygen so that it foams but not foams over.


      ...With this process, the center-cut jug is drinkable at 2 weeks, perfect at 3 weeks, and needs to be racked off the oak by 6 weeks. The "outer-cut" Whiskey can probably age for years with benefit because it's really not that great but totally drinkable from about a month or so on, and I don't expect too much from it.


      So... Am I missing anything? Is anyone willing to go through their process and help me understand that a 6 month or more (center-cut) product is vastly superior and worth the effort than what I have going at 3 weeks?


      Thank you guys,
      bl
    • Adam Fordham
      Enjoyed reading your post. This is what we need more of....people sharing their processes. I m no expert and think ill try your freezer trick so thank-you.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 14 7:23 PM
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        Enjoyed reading your post. This is what we need more of....people sharing their processes. I'm no expert and think ill try your freezer trick so thank-you. I have medium toast and light toast oak chips I've purchased online. I've got several experiments going on. I'm ageing corn whiskey in gallon glass jugs at different proofs on 1/2 cup of oak. I open the jugs and leave open one night a month. I taste occasionally and notice the changes can go from good to not so good and back to good. I currently make a corn barley whiskey 8 lbs corn to 2 lbs barley in 30 gal batches keeping my water to grain ratio at 1:2 ( two pounds of grain to one gallon of water). I hot mash and don't use sugar. I'm light years from Johnny walker blue label lol but have made some nice juice.


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        From: bruich44 <bruichladdich44@...>;
        To: <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>;
        Subject: [new_distillers] My 3 Week Whiskey VS Your 6 Month Whiskey
        Sent: Fri, Jul 15, 2011 2:04:48 AM

         

        It's pretty common advice by the movers and shakers of this forum that you need to age your Whiskey for 6 months or more for a perfect product. If I'm going to improve my product, longer aging is the only variable I have left to play with.

        While relatively new to distilling I'm old to brewing and intimately familiar with most commercial Scotch and Bourbons (and that's an expensive statement!) and am proud of my 3 week Whiskey. Everyone that I've given some to has really enjoyed it and is shocked at its age. I just haven't found the motivation to age longer, but like everyone, I'm in pursuit of a more-perfect product.

        As my Whiskey gets to 6 weeks and 2 months, it's less enjoyable - more oak and color with no further smoothness or sweetness. My guess is either I do steps not taken by others, over-oak, or in aging, there's a lag period where my 3 week is excellent, 2 month is not, but 6 month is vastly superior... I've never gotten that far.

        I was hoping to quickly run through my process and if you do pretty much what I do, but don't enjoy your product until 6 months, then you are either pouring the most exquisite elixir ever distilled, or something else is amiss...

        30# grain (more or less) w/ yeast either ale or champagne
        Post-fermentation 12 gal (more or less) at 8% (more or less)
        Distilled and collected down to 10%

        Repeat above to get about 4 gal or so as low-wines

        Distill low-wines diluted to around 25%, collect foreshots, and the rest in separate containers 100-200mls. Wait 1-3 days.

        Cut by nose and taste. Collect only the most perfect jars in "center-cut" 1 gal glass jug. Collect the usable other jars in "outer-cut" 1 gal jug. Everything else dumped into "Feints" carboy. When you fill up 1 gal jugs (at 60-62%) continue to the next step...

        Take a heart-wood White Oak log from firewood pile (or used French Oak barrel) and turn it into around 1/2" square stock, around 6" long. Have 100 of these sitting on your shelf to further dry out in time. Take each "stave" and char the bejesus out of it with your Mapp Gas torch until it resembles nothing. Dunk it immediately in clean (RO) water until the sizzling stops and char it again. Dunk again and set aside and do another. When you get 8 sticks done, drop them in your 1 gal vessel, cork.

        Age for 3 weeks or more. Every other day, put in the freezer, and back on shelf. (I have 4 jugs going now, so now it's 1 day freezer, 3 days shelf per jug.)

        About 1x a week (more or less, say 3x total) take your .5 micron SS stone and bubble pure oxygen into the jug, about 30 seconds, more or less. Bubble enough oxygen so that it foams but not foams over.

        ...With this process, the center-cut jug is drinkable at 2 weeks, perfect at 3 weeks, and needs to be racked off the oak by 6 weeks. The "outer-cut" Whiskey can probably age for years with benefit because it's really not that great but totally drinkable from about a month or so on, and I don't expect too much from it.

        So... Am I missing anything? Is anyone willing to go through their process and help me understand that a 6 month or more (center-cut) product is vastly superior and worth the effort than what I have going at 3 weeks?

        Thank you guys,
        bl

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