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breafruit again

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  • bravo
    African breadfruit seeds have the potentials as carbon source for ethanol production with a carbohydrate value of 72.19%. On malting the seeds at 28±2oC for 9
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 7, 2011
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      African breadfruit seeds have the potentials as carbon source for ethanol production with a carbohydrate
      value of 72.19%. On malting the seeds at 28±2oC for 9 days it yielded a 96% germination capacity and
      total malting loss of 25.70%. Grain dormancy was broken by the second day of malting. Malted breadfruit
      seeds were ground and defatted to 0.78% fat content. Full fat breadfruit and defatted breadfruit flours
      were used as adjuncts in the ratio of 3:5 (adjuncts: barley). Fermentation parameters such as wort
      fermentable sugar, specific gravity, extract yield and ethanol were measured over the 9 days of
      fermentation. Extract yields were 12.59, 9.66 and 11.23% while ethanol production was 5.79, 6.39 and
      6.10% for wort from defatted breadfruit, full fat breadfruit and maize, respectively.


      this is a study for breadfruit that was done. this was done on 1 variety which has seeds
      i dont have those with seeeds.
      the ones we have is seedless about 2kg ball of startch on its own.

      the questions i want to ask is this.
      i will be using enzymes to break down the starch into sugar in orderto ferment.
      do i really need to boil the breadfruit . or just steep it.

      the way it was used in this experiment was the same way it s used to make beer with lots of temp control etc addding malt and corn and what not
      i dont have barley and corn .
      so im thinking of using breadfruit, enzyme, sugar, yeast
      of course water
      will it work before i spend the dough.
      thanks for your interest
      if u interested in the full 20 pages research please ask
      i will email direct to you.
    • tgfoitwoods
      Hi Bossy, Comments inline, in red. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller ... ethanol production with a carbohydrate ... yielded a 96% germination capacity and ...
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 8, 2011
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        Hi Bossy,

        Comments inline, in red.

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "bravo" <bravoseychelles@...> wrote:
        >
        > African breadfruit seeds have the potentials as carbon source for ethanol production with a carbohydrate
        > value of 72.19%. On malting the seeds at 28±2oC for 9 days it yielded a 96% germination capacity and
        > total malting loss of 25.70%. Grain dormancy was broken by the second day of malting. Malted breadfruit
        > seeds were ground and defatted to 0.78% fat content. Full fat breadfruit and defatted breadfruit flours
        > were used as adjuncts in the ratio of 3:5 (adjuncts: barley). Fermentation parameters such as wort
        > fermentable sugar, specific gravity, extract yield and ethanol were measured over the 9 days of
        > fermentation. Extract yields were 12.59, 9.66 and 11.23% while ethanol production was 5.79, 6.39 and
        > 6.10% for wort from defatted breadfruit, full fat breadfruit and maize, respectively.
        >
        >
        > this is a study for breadfruit that was done. this was done on 1 variety which has seeds
        > i dont have those with seeeds.
        > the ones we have is seedless about 2kg ball of startch on its own.
        >
        > the questions i want to ask is this.
        > i will be using enzymes to break down the starch into sugar in orderto ferment.
        > do i really need to boil the breadfruit . or just steep it.

        It all depends on whether the raw fruit starch is available to the enzymes, as to whether you have to heat it or not. From my small and old memory of breadfruit, it was roasted in a fire and then opened and eaten. That makes it likely that heat is necessary to make those starches available to enzymes.

        If it were me, I'd try 2 ferments, one with just mashed breadfruit pulp with alpha- and beta- amylase enzymes, and the other with boiled mashed pulp and enzymes.
        >
        > the way it was used in this experiment was the same way it s used to make beer with lots of temp control etc addding malt and corn and what not
        > i dont have barley and corn .
        > so im thinking of using breadfruit, enzyme, sugar, yeast
        > of course water
        > will it work before i spend the dough.
        > thanks for your interest
        > if u interested in the full 20 pages research please ask
        > i will email direct to you.
        >
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