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Re: [new_distillers] KEG

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  • J. Ganble
    If you buy a keg in this area,there is a $75 refundable deposit. ... From: Brian Bashford To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, June 02, 2002 7:17
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 2, 2002
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      If you buy a keg in this area,there is a $75 refundable deposit.
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, June 02, 2002 7:17 PM
      Subject: Re: [new_distillers] KEG

      Hi Campbell,
         Yes, I always thought I was going to have to pinch one on the way home one dark night but according to the landlord I approached there isn't a deposit. He said to take whichever one I wanted out of a stack of about 30. This was a Laurel Inns / Whitbread pub. UK, East Sussex.
       
      Brian B.
      ----- Original Message -----
       

      Hi Brian

      Would that be in the UK........ Hopefully ?

      I'm desperate for one but heard that the breweries are very sore on this subject

        Brian Bashford <tipitina@...> wrote:

      Mine came from a pub. I asked for one and they told me to take my pick. I thought there was a deposit on them but apparently not.
        Brian B.



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    • headbrewser
      Less problems if you go to the manufacturer and purchase one of their unrepairable kegs at the scrap metal value. Mine were AUS$20 each. The manufacturers name
      Message 2 of 23 , Jun 2, 2002
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        Less problems if you go to the manufacturer and purchase one of their
        unrepairable kegs at the scrap metal value. Mine were AUS$20 each.
        The manufacturers name is on the handle section.

        Keep the receipt to show the fabricator if adding fittings.

        If you don't get a pretty one, then you still have a receipt for when
        you stummble upon a new shiny one
      • billy bob
        Just wondering if you have any idea who the manufacturer of these kegs is.Thanks Martin ... _________________________________________________________________
        Message 3 of 23 , Jun 2, 2002
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          Just wondering if you have any idea who the manufacturer of these kegs
          is.Thanks
          Martin


          >From: "headbrewser" <headbrewser@...>
          >Reply-To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [new_distillers] Re: KEG
          >Date: Mon, 03 Jun 2002 04:19:09 -0000
          >
          >Less problems if you go to the manufacturer and purchase one of their
          >unrepairable kegs at the scrap metal value. Mine were AUS$20 each.
          >The manufacturers name is on the handle section.
          >
          >Keep the receipt to show the fabricator if adding fittings.
          >
          >If you don't get a pretty one, then you still have a receipt for when
          >you stummble upon a new shiny one
          >




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        • Campbell Jones
          Hi Brian Just got back to the sticks after a visit to the smoke !!! I loitered near by every pub on the way back and saw some shiny beauties So now I shall
          Message 4 of 23 , Jun 6, 2002
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            Hi Brian

            Just got back to the sticks after a visit to the smoke !!!  I loitered near by every pub on the way back and saw some shiny beauties  So now I shall have a quiet chat with my local landlord.

            One question arises. Any tips on how to make the joint between the column and the top of the Keg ? Other's attempts look mightily complicated

            Anyway, thanks for the info

            Campbell 

              Brian Bashford <tipitina@...> wrote:

            Hi Campbell,
               Yes, I always thought I was going to have to pinch one on the way home one dark night but according to the landlord I approached there isn't a deposit. He said to take whichever one I wanted out of a stack of about 30. This was a Laurel Inns / Whitbread pub. UK, East Sussex.
             
            Brian B.
            ----- Original Message -----
             

            Hi Brian

            Would that be in the UK........ Hopefully ?

            I'm desperate for one but heard that the breweries are very sore on this subject

              Brian Bashford <tipitina@...> wrote:

            Mine came from a pub. I asked for one and they told me to take my pick. I thought there was a deposit on them but apparently not.
              Brian B.



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          • Michael Spottswood
            Hi Campbell: I use a keg for my boiler and was not interested in making a complicated flange or removable lid that would have gaskets. So at the risk of a
            Message 5 of 23 , Jun 6, 2002
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              Hi Campbell:
              I use a keg for my boiler and was not interested in making a complicated
              flange or removable lid that would have gaskets. So at the risk of a more
              difficult cleaning procedure, I did the following:

              I purchased a 2" stainless steel half-coupling from McMaster-Carr
              www.mcmaster.com and had it welded to the opening where the keg valve once
              was.

              Then I purchased a 2" copper sweat thread adapter from the local plumbing
              house and soldered it to the reflux column. I had considered using teflon
              tape to seal it, but found it was not needed as I did not spring a vapor
              leak from the joint without it. I believe it is because the copper is quite
              a bit softer than the stainless.

              If you consider this option, make sure the threads match. The stuff I found
              had 11.5 threads-per-inch and were NPT (normal pipe thread).

              The overall price for both pieces totaled about $25.00 US and it works
              great. When I need to clean the boiler, I just take it to a friend's shop
              and powerwash it with a device similar to a manual car wash. This was a
              very simple and inexpensive way to attach the column and it saved me a lot
              of time and money in screw-ups.

              One last consideration:
              I was lucky enough to find a 2 inch brass union in my friends scrap heap;
              they are about $30.00 US new. I have this soldered to the column directly
              above the thread adapter so that I do not have to continuously remove the
              column by the threads. That would cause considerable wear on the copper.
              Usually, if you add a sweat coupling without sweating one side, you won't
              get a leak, as there is no pressure on the system. This will allow easy
              removal of the column for filling, draining, cleaning, etc.

              Hope this helps,
              Mike

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            • Steve
              Hi all, I m very new to this game and was wondering what you people use to clear the wash? I did a little research and found that Sparkeloid (Sparkalloid?) was
              Message 6 of 23 , Jun 6, 2002
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                Hi all,

                I'm very new to this game and was wondering what you people use to clear
                the wash? I did a little research and found that Sparkeloid
                (Sparkalloid?) was mentioned a few times. Anyone know if this is
                available in Australia?

                I also think that I read somewhere that egg white can be used. Does
                anyone have any info on this, or any other tips?

                Thanks,
                Steve
              • waljaco
                Sparkalloid is a proprietary fining made from seaweed. For alternative finings to clear wash see msg 3264 & 3278 Wal ... clear
                Message 7 of 23 , Jun 6, 2002
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                  Sparkalloid is a proprietary fining made from seaweed.
                  For alternative finings to clear wash see msg 3264 & 3278

                  Wal

                  --- In new_distillers@y..., "Steve" <sbeek@i...> wrote:
                  > Hi all,
                  >
                  > I'm very new to this game and was wondering what you people use to
                  clear
                  > the wash? I did a little research and found that Sparkeloid
                  > (Sparkalloid?) was mentioned a few times. Anyone know if this is
                  > available in Australia?
                  >
                  > I also think that I read somewhere that egg white can be used. Does
                  > anyone have any info on this, or any other tips?
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  > Steve
                • Steve
                  Thanks Wal, I did an archive search but used wash as the search criteria. I ll try gelatine in my next wash. Cheers, Steve
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jun 6, 2002
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                    Thanks Wal,

                    I did an archive search but used "wash" as the search criteria. I'll try
                    gelatine in my next wash.

                    Cheers,
                    Steve

                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: waljaco [mailto:waljaco@...]
                    > Sent: Friday, 7 June 2002 4:23 PM
                    > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Clearing Wash
                    >
                    > Sparkalloid is a proprietary fining made from seaweed.
                    > For alternative finings to clear wash see msg 3264 & 3278
                    >
                    > Wal
                  • Rev. David M. Cunningham
                    On Fri, 7 Jun 2002 13:06:43 +1000 Steve wrote: S S I also think that I read somewhere that egg white can be used. Does S anyone
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jun 7, 2002
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                      On Fri, 7 Jun 2002 13:06:43 +1000
                      "Steve" <sbeek@...> wrote:


                      S>
                      S> I also think that I read somewhere that egg white can be used. Does
                      S> anyone have any info on this, or any other tips?
                      S>

                      Natural organic fining material in common use are albumen, gelatin, and
                      isinglass. Most of these rely on their combining with tannin in wine to
                      effect clarification. For that reason it is generally necessary to add
                      tannin to white wines at the rate of 1/2 gram per gallon 24 hours before
                      fining with these materials. Exceptions to this rule of thumb are such
                      high-tannin white wines as those made from grapefruit and pears.

                      Organic fining materials are used in the following ways:

                      Albumen: Beat the white of one egg and a pinch of salt in 1 bottle of
                      wine until frothy. Mix well with the wine, to which tannin was added 24
                      hours earlier. One egg white will clear up to 10 gallons of wine. The
                      wine with the egg white should stand quietly for 2 to 3 weeks. When
                      clear, rack and bottle or distill.

                      Gelatin: Use the finest obtainable gelatin (unflavored, granulated food
                      gelatin is handy). Dissolve in 1 cup warm water, and add to 1 bottle of
                      wine. When thoroughly dissolved in the wine, mix with the remaining
                      tannin-treated wine. Allow to clear; then rack and bottle or distill.

                      Isinglass: Isinglass is a fish gelatin made from sturgeon. It may be
                      possible to obtain it from a large chemical supply house or from some of
                      the better wine and brewing shops. The required amount of sheet
                      isinglass is soaked in wine for 24 hours; then the wine and isinglass
                      are disintegrated in a blender. Isinglass can be added to tannin-treated
                      wine in the same manner as described for albumen and gelatin.

                      Most of this was taken from different wine books that I have and the
                      knowledge that was passed down to me through family tradition. I have
                      never used these methods, so I can offer no further advise on tips or
                      tricks on how to make it work "just right" for you. The family members
                      that have handed down their wine knowledge to me have passed from their
                      incarnation and are now making wine with the gods.

                      Sincerely,
                      Rev. David M. Cunningham
                    • ups474@aol.com
                      Gelatin doesn t work as well in sugar mashes- it works by binding to tannin- which sugar doesn t have. The best bet is Polyclar AT. It can be done in as
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jun 7, 2002
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                        Gelatin doesn't work as well in sugar mashes- it works by binding to tannin-
                        which sugar doesn't have. The best bet is Polyclar AT. It can be done in as
                        little as a few hours.
                      • Campbell Jones
                        Hi Mike Thanks for the info. The only part of that approach was cleaning the keg after use. You refered to a pressure washer for this. I guess a domestic
                        Message 11 of 23 , Jun 8, 2002
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                          Hi Mike

                           

                          Thanks for the info.

                          The only part of that approach was cleaning the keg after use. You refered  to a pressure washer for this. I guess a domestic power washer would do the trick ? Although my present project is based on a small  ss domestic washboiler I am being drawn to a ss keg for the future. What a hobby this is ............

                          Cheers

                          Campbell

                           

                            Michael Spottswood <mikespotts@...> wrote:

                          Hi Campbell:
                          I use a keg for my boiler and was not interested in making a complicated
                          flange or removable lid that would have gaskets. So at the risk of a more
                          difficult cleaning procedure, I did the following:

                          I purchased a 2" stainless steel half-coupling from McMaster-Carr
                          www.mcmaster.com and had it welded to the opening where the keg valve once
                          was.

                          Then I purchased a 2" copper sweat thread adapter from the local plumbing
                          house and soldered it to the reflux column. I had considered using teflon
                          tape to seal it, but found it was not needed as I did not spring a vapor
                          leak from the joint without it. I believe it is because the copper is quite
                          a bit softer than the stainless.

                          If you consider this option, make sure the threads match. The stuff I found
                          had 11.5 threads-per-inch and were NPT (normal pipe thread).

                          The overall price for both pieces totaled about $25.00 US and it works
                          great. When I need to clean the boiler, I just take it to a friend's shop
                          and powerwash it with a device similar to a manual car wash. This was a
                          very simple and inexpensive way to attach the column and it saved me a lot
                          of time and money in screw-ups.

                          One last consideration:
                          I was lucky enough to find a 2 inch brass union in my friends scrap heap;
                          they are about $30.00 US new. I have this soldered to the column directly
                          above the thread adapter so that I do not have to continuously remove the
                          column by the threads. That would cause considerable wear on the copper.
                          Usually, if you add a sweat coupling without sweating one side, you won't
                          get a leak, as there is no pressure on the system. This will allow easy
                          removal of the column for filling, draining, cleaning, etc.

                          Hope this helps,
                          Mike

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                        • janpam ooms
                          Hi there, Polyclar AT no doubt is a US trade name. What is it exactly made from. We might have it here in Australia under a different trading name. Thanking
                          Message 12 of 23 , Jun 8, 2002
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                            Hi there, Polyclar AT no doubt is a US trade name. What is it exactly made
                            from. We might have it here in Australia under a different trading name.
                            Thanking you for all the good advise in the past and no doubt well into the
                            future.
                            Regards. JAN.

                            >From: ups474@...
                            >Reply-To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            >Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Clearing Wash
                            >Date: Sat, 8 Jun 2002 01:30:23 EDT
                            >
                            >Gelatin doesn't work as well in sugar mashes- it works by binding to
                            >tannin-
                            >which sugar doesn't have. The best bet is Polyclar AT. It can be done in
                            >as
                            >little as a few hours.




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                          • Steve
                            Hi Rev. David M. Cunningham, Thanks for your information. ... If you ve never used any of the suggested methods then how do you clear your wash? Cheers, Steve
                            Message 13 of 23 , Jun 8, 2002
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                              Hi Rev. David M. Cunningham,

                              Thanks for your information.

                              > knowledge that was passed down to me through family tradition. I have
                              > never used these methods, so I can offer no further advise on tips or

                              If you've never used any of the suggested methods then how do you clear
                              your wash?

                              Cheers,
                              Steve
                            • ups474@aol.com
                              Polycalr AT is also known as povidone (short for polyvinylpyrrolidone). It s a powder derived from Nylon 66. you use it at a rate of 30-50 grams per 100
                              Message 14 of 23 , Jun 8, 2002
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                                Polycalr AT is also known as povidone (short for polyvinylpyrrolidone). It's
                                a powder derived from Nylon 66. you use it at a rate of 30-50 grams per 100
                                liters. Dissolve it in sterile water, and add it to the mash. Another good
                                choice is to set up a cheap filter system. The stuff sold in camping-gear
                                outfits for use as water purifiers can be turned into a lot of neat mash
                                filters.
                              • Campbell Jones
                                Hi Steve Now that is a good question Steve. I am a newcomer to turbo yeasts having used ordinary wine yeasts for years both for home wine production and
                                Message 15 of 23 , Jun 9, 2002
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                                  Hi Steve

                                  Now that is a good question Steve. I am a newcomer to turbo yeasts having used " ordinary "  wine yeasts for years both for home wine production and our hobby too. I could ferment, rack and use these in approx 6 weeks as they were then " crystal " clear withiut the addition of any clearing product.

                                  Can anyone please tell me how long ( assuming no temperature problems in fermentation etc. ) it takes for a wash to clear enough to distill using these products. I started 25 L over two weeks ago and it went down to .996 OK. It has been sitting in a cold 58 F cellar since then and is still far too cloudy to use. Weeks  .... Months.?? Apart from the obvious high alcohol production is there any point in using these expensive chemicals ?

                                  Just wondering folks   ..... and impatient as I am waiting to do a first run on a new outfit.

                                  Cheers

                                  Campbell

                                   

                                    Steve <sbeek@...> wrote:

                                  Hi Rev. David M. Cunningham,

                                  Thanks for your information.

                                  > knowledge that was passed down to me through family tradition. I have
                                  > never used these methods, so I can offer no further advise on tips or

                                  If you've never used any of the suggested methods then how do you clear
                                  your wash?

                                  Cheers,
                                        Steve



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                                • Rev. David M. Cunningham
                                  Message 16 of 23 , Jun 9, 2002
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                                    << If you've never used any of the suggested methods then how do you
                                    clear your wash? >>


                                    Just to clear up some things (no pun intended), I never "suggested" the
                                    methods that I described. I only offered them as a piece of "historical"
                                    knowledge. I have no idea how well those methods really work, but by the
                                    amount of old wine making instructions that I have came across, they
                                    must have worked real well for those times. My family members used to
                                    use them, so I guess they were good for something.

                                    For my "brews," I let it sit and allow for it to clear itself. I don't use those "Turbo"
                                    yeasts, as I use regular EC-1118 and K1-V1116 by Lalvin.

                                    I make wine and this is where most of my "brewing" knowledge comes
                                    from. I follow my recipe's (yes Lynne, I do add and subtract from them
                                    when necessary) and make them just like any other type of wine. I have
                                    have used Sparkiloid (spelling?) a few times for real stubborn ones.

                                    Plain and simple -- that is the way I like things.

                                    Sincerely,
                                    Rev. David M. Cunningham

                                    P.S. I never received the original e-mail asking me this question, so I
                                    apologize for not answering sooner. It seems that Yahoo! and local law
                                    enforcement like to play with my e-mail at times.
                                  • waljaco
                                    peter_vcb in msg 3263 recommended Common Wine and Beer Finings site http://www.brewerylane.com/finings.html Good description of the various finings available
                                    Message 17 of 23 , Jun 10, 2002
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                                      peter_vcb in msg 3263 recommended "Common Wine and Beer Finings" site
                                      http://www.brewerylane.com/finings.html
                                      Good description of the various finings available - appears you might
                                      need a positive and negative charged fining to be absolutely sure?

                                      Wal

                                      --- In new_distillers@y..., "Steve" <sbeek@i...> wrote:
                                      > Hi Rev. David M. Cunningham,
                                      >
                                      > Thanks for your information.
                                      >
                                      > > knowledge that was passed down to me through family tradition. I
                                      have
                                      > > never used these methods, so I can offer no further advise on tips
                                      or
                                      >
                                      > If you've never used any of the suggested methods then how do you
                                      clear
                                      > your wash?
                                      >
                                      > Cheers,
                                      > Steve
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