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disappointed?

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  • William Musall
    I don t know if I should be disappointed or not. Seeing as this is my first wash in years and I was just piddling with it then, I would say not. (Recap)10 lbs
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 22, 2011
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      I don't know if I should be disappointed or not. Seeing as this is my first wash in years and I was just piddling with it then, I would say not. (Recap)10 lbs sugar, 1 1/2 pounds white corn meal, 2 jars corn syrup, 10 gallons water, and 1 teaspoon distilliers yeast. I took a reading today and it was 7%. I was expecting a little higher of at least 12 to 18%. Fermentation has slowed to a bubble here and there with just islands of a cap still floating. Should I just go ahead and run it or wait another day or two? What will happen if you run a wash that has a slight fermentation still going on? I'm guessing that I'll only be able get just under a half gallon of drinkable liquer?
    • Derek Hamlet
      Even though slight bubbles will affect the specific gravity, I would check that to determine if the fermentation is more or less finished. If the sg is below
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 22, 2011
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        Even though slight bubbles will affect the specific gravity, I would
        check that to determine if the fermentation is more or less finished.
        If the sg is below one, you have pretty much fermented out. Just let
        it clear and run it.
        At 08:58 AM 2/22/2011, you wrote:
        >
        >
        >I don't know if I should be disappointed or not. Seeing as this is
        >my first wash in years and I was just piddling with it then, I would
        >say not. (Recap)10 lbs sugar, 1 1/2 pounds white corn meal, 2 jars
        >corn syrup, 10 gallons water, and 1 teaspoon distilliers yeast. I
        >took a reading today and it was 7%. I was expecting a little higher
        >of at least 12 to 18%. Fermentation has slowed to a bubble here and
        >there with just islands of a cap still floating. Should I just go
        >ahead and run it or wait another day or two? What will happen if you
        >run a wash that has a slight fermentation still going on? I'm
        >guessing that I'll only be able get just under a half gallon of
        >drinkable liquer?

        Derek
      • bigdaddyg851
        when you start a wash take a hydrometer reading . that will give you your potential alcohol and your SG . when the wash is complete your hydrometer should sink
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 22, 2011
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          when you start a wash take a hydrometer reading . that will give you your potential alcohol and your SG . when the wash is complete your hydrometer should sink and give you a reading of about 1.010 to .990 and taste bitter dry .

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "William Musall" <squirrelliquer@...> wrote:
          >
          > I don't know if I should be disappointed or not. Seeing as this is my first wash in years and I was just piddling with it then, I would say not. (Recap)10 lbs sugar, 1 1/2 pounds white corn meal, 2 jars corn syrup, 10 gallons water, and 1 teaspoon distilliers yeast. I took a reading today and it was 7%. I was expecting a little higher of at least 12 to 18%. Fermentation has slowed to a bubble here and there with just islands of a cap still floating. Should I just go ahead and run it or wait another day or two? What will happen if you run a wash that has a slight fermentation still going on? I'm guessing that I'll only be able get just under a half gallon of drinkable liquer?
          >
        • tgfoitwoods
          William, I have a couple-three major questions. First, when you say I took a reading , what instrument did you use and what values did you read? Is there any
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 22, 2011
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            William,

            I have a couple-three major questions.

            First, when you say "I took a reading", what instrument did you use and what values did you read? Is there any chance you are reading "potential alcohol" values from a hydrometer? We need to find out specifically what you measured and how, to get an idea of what went right or wrong.

            The other question is, "What yeast nutrients did you use?" I'm not really sure how much yeast nutrient there is in 1.5 pounds of cornemal, but that appears to be the only nutrients you put in the fermentation. If that is not enough nutrient, then I would expect your fermentation to just kinda peter out.

            Next, I question how much alcohol you would expected to get. 1 pound of sugar per gallon (what you mixed) would ideally (but not really) give you slightly less than a 6% ABV wash. SInce I don't know the size of concentration of the corn syrup jars, I don't know how much more alcohol to expect from their addition. Since the corn starches are unconverted, the cornmeal adds nothing to potential alcohol. Long story short, unless those corn syrup jars were huge, no way you'll see 12-18%

            Wildly guessing with what information I have so far, I'd say you started a 7-8% potential alcohol wash with no yeast nutrients, so the yeast ran out of food and is playing Donner Party in your stuck ferment. Others more knowledgable about nutrients in cornmeal may disagree with me.

            Give us more information about those readings.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "William Musall" <squirrelliquer@...> wrote:
            >
            > I don't know if I should be disappointed or not. Seeing as this is my first wash in years and I was just piddling with it then, I would say not. (Recap)10 lbs sugar, 1 1/2 pounds white corn meal, 2 jars corn syrup, 10 gallons water, and 1 teaspoon distilliers yeast. I took a reading today and it was 7%. I was expecting a little higher of at least 12 to 18%. Fermentation has slowed to a bubble here and there with just islands of a cap still floating. Should I just go ahead and run it or wait another day or two? What will happen if you run a wash that has a slight fermentation still going on? I'm guessing that I'll only be able get just under a half gallon of drinkable liquer?
            >
          • William Musall
            By your answers and guesstaments I think you are right. Just saw rest of your questions. No other nutrients and 2 small jars of syrup. Actually took 2 readings
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 22, 2011
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              By your answers and guesstaments I think you are right. Just saw rest of your questions. No other nutrients and 2 small jars of syrup. Actually took 2 readings and first was an 8 then 2nd was a 7 so I went with 7. Just for laughs and giggles "I'm goin ta run wat I brung"

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
              >
              > William,
              >
              > I have a couple-three major questions.
              >
              > First, when you say "I took a reading", what instrument did you use and what values did you read? Is there any chance you are reading "potential alcohol" values from a hydrometer? We need to find out specifically what you measured and how, to get an idea of what went right or wrong.
              >
              > The other question is, "What yeast nutrients did you use?" I'm not really sure how much yeast nutrient there is in 1.5 pounds of cornemal, but that appears to be the only nutrients you put in the fermentation. If that is not enough nutrient, then I would expect your fermentation to just kinda peter out.
              >
              > Next, I question how much alcohol you would expected to get. 1 pound of sugar per gallon (what you mixed) would ideally (but not really) give you slightly less than a 6% ABV wash. SInce I don't know the size of concentration of the corn syrup jars, I don't know how much more alcohol to expect from their addition. Since the corn starches are unconverted, the cornmeal adds nothing to potential alcohol. Long story short, unless those corn syrup jars were huge, no way you'll see 12-18%
              >
              > Wildly guessing with what information I have so far, I'd say you started a 7-8% potential alcohol wash with no yeast nutrients, so the yeast ran out of food and is playing Donner Party in your stuck ferment. Others more knowledgable about nutrients in cornmeal may disagree with me.
              >
              > Give us more information about those readings.
              >
              > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "William Musall" <squirrelliquer@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I don't know if I should be disappointed or not. Seeing as this is my first wash in years and I was just piddling with it then, I would say not. (Recap)10 lbs sugar, 1 1/2 pounds white corn meal, 2 jars corn syrup, 10 gallons water, and 1 teaspoon distilliers yeast. I took a reading today and it was 7%. I was expecting a little higher of at least 12 to 18%. Fermentation has slowed to a bubble here and there with just islands of a cap still floating. Should I just go ahead and run it or wait another day or two? What will happen if you run a wash that has a slight fermentation still going on? I'm guessing that I'll only be able get just under a half gallon of drinkable liquer?
              > >
              >
            • bigdaddyg851
              A vino-meter is only good for testing dry wines .
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 22, 2011
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                A vino-meter is only good for testing dry wines .

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "William Musall" <squirrelliquer@...> wrote:
                >
                > By your answers and guesstaments I think you are right. Just saw rest of your questions. No other nutrients and 2 small jars of syrup. Actually took 2 readings and first was an 8 then 2nd was a 7 so I went with 7. Just for laughs and giggles "I'm goin ta run wat I brung"
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@> wrote:
                > >
                > > William,
                > >
                > > I have a couple-three major questions.
                > >
                > > First, when you say "I took a reading", what instrument did you use and what values did you read? Is there any chance you are reading "potential alcohol" values from a hydrometer? We need to find out specifically what you measured and how, to get an idea of what went right or wrong.
                > >
                > > The other question is, "What yeast nutrients did you use?" I'm not really sure how much yeast nutrient there is in 1.5 pounds of cornemal, but that appears to be the only nutrients you put in the fermentation. If that is not enough nutrient, then I would expect your fermentation to just kinda peter out.
                > >
                > > Next, I question how much alcohol you would expected to get. 1 pound of sugar per gallon (what you mixed) would ideally (but not really) give you slightly less than a 6% ABV wash. SInce I don't know the size of concentration of the corn syrup jars, I don't know how much more alcohol to expect from their addition. Since the corn starches are unconverted, the cornmeal adds nothing to potential alcohol. Long story short, unless those corn syrup jars were huge, no way you'll see 12-18%
                > >
                > > Wildly guessing with what information I have so far, I'd say you started a 7-8% potential alcohol wash with no yeast nutrients, so the yeast ran out of food and is playing Donner Party in your stuck ferment. Others more knowledgable about nutrients in cornmeal may disagree with me.
                > >
                > > Give us more information about those readings.
                > >
                > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                > >
                > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "William Musall" <squirrelliquer@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I don't know if I should be disappointed or not. Seeing as this is my first wash in years and I was just piddling with it then, I would say not. (Recap)10 lbs sugar, 1 1/2 pounds white corn meal, 2 jars corn syrup, 10 gallons water, and 1 teaspoon distilliers yeast. I took a reading today and it was 7%. I was expecting a little higher of at least 12 to 18%. Fermentation has slowed to a bubble here and there with just islands of a cap still floating. Should I just go ahead and run it or wait another day or two? What will happen if you run a wash that has a slight fermentation still going on? I'm guessing that I'll only be able get just under a half gallon of drinkable liquer?
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • witherspoon_q
                William, Because calculating the sugars available for fermentation would be painstakingly complicated I would first rely upon the Starting Specific Gravity.
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 22, 2011
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                  William,

                  Because calculating the sugars available for fermentation would be painstakingly complicated I would first rely upon the Starting Specific Gravity. If unknown, then there is no telling what your potential yield will be. However, take the guesswork out of the equation and just wait it out. I've had the same problem before. I didn't get a good SG reading up front and had no clue as to what the potential was. I estimated a day when I thought the fermentation would be finished. Then, I let it sit and settle for another week. It was crystal clear when I racked it off and sent it to the still.

                  I stripped it and ran a spirit run and ended up with a certain amount that was unpredictable.
                • bruich44
                  Same thing (ish) happened to me last week. Pretty embarrassing. I wanted to throw some stuff together as a post-vinegar clean out wash and added a few
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 23, 2011
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                    Same thing (ish) happened to me last week. Pretty embarrassing. I wanted to throw some stuff together as a post-vinegar clean out wash and added a few leftover bags of sugar to the hottest tap water I had until I reached 5 gal at 1.050, let cool to 80 and pitched a few packets of expired yeast. 2 days later, maybe a bubble through the airlock no greater than every 30 sec or so, I added a teaspoon of Ferment-K. 2 days after that I decided to stop being an idiot and dumped the bucket back into the boil kettle with enough DME to reach 1.080, brought to boil, cooled to 80, and pitched a quart of fresh ale slurry from a beer. Within a few hours I had to remove the airlock and let the yeast spill over the bucket onto the towel it sits on. 2 days later it was done at 1.002. Proper nutrients for your yeast (and good yeast) makes all the difference.

                    -bl
                  • jamesonbeam1
                    Your correct Big, The main reason vinometers cannot and will not be able to measure new fermentations is due to the CO2 being processed by the yeast. They are
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 27, 2011
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                      Your correct Big,

                      The main reason vinometers cannot and will not be able to measure new
                      fermentations is due to the CO2 being processed by the yeast. They are
                      a tiny opening inside a tube that measures the alcohol by the fact that
                      alcohol is lighter than water. However, when the carbon dioxide gas is
                      being created in a new fermentation, the gas gets inside the tube and
                      screws up any results. Also if there are any solids from grains or
                      molasses in the mix, your screwed. However, this alos will impact and
                      deviate a hydrometer reading as well.

                      JB. aka Waldo.


                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "bigdaddyg851" <bigdaddyg851@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      > A vino-meter is only good for testing dry wines .
                      >
                      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "William Musall"
                      squirrelliquer@ wrote:
                      > >
                      > > By your answers and guesstaments I think you are right. Just saw
                      rest of your questions. No other nutrients and 2 small jars of syrup.
                      Actually took 2 readings and first was an 8 then 2nd was a 7 so I went
                      with 7. Just for laughs and giggles "I'm goin ta run wat I brung"
                    • jamesonbeam1
                      Calculating potential ABV is simple if you first consult one of the brix to ABV charts aroud. I use http://www.brsquared.org/wine/CalcInfo/HydSugAl.htm
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 27, 2011
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                        Calculating  potential ABV is simple if you first consult one of the brix to ABV charts aroud.  I use
                        http://www.brsquared.org/wine/CalcInfo/HydSugAl.htm for getting a ball park idea of amounts of sugar to use in a fermentation.  Tony also has a sugar to alcohol calculation on his site in the sugar wash section but its a bit high in its results.  Keeping the potential ABV below 16% results in  a smoother distillation and more flavors especially if making the brown stuff.

                        JB. aka Waldo.

                         

                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "witherspoon_q" <witherspoon_q@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > William,
                        >
                        > Because calculating the sugars available for fermentation would be painstakingly complicated I would first rely upon the Starting Specific Gravity. If unknown, then there is no telling what your potential yield will be. However, take the guesswork out of the equation and just wait it out. I've had the same problem before. I didn't get a good SG reading up front and had no clue as to what the potential was. I estimated a day when I thought the fermentation would be finished. Then, I let it sit and settle for another week. It was crystal clear when I racked it off and sent it to the still.
                        >
                        > I stripped it and ran a spirit run and ended up with a certain amount that was unpredictable.
                        >

                      • William Musall
                        I guess I m not too concerned at this point on content. Still learning and have a great deal to learn. Wash is still fermenting and I am trying to piece
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 27, 2011
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                          I guess I'm not too concerned at this point on content. Still learning and have a great deal to learn. Wash is still fermenting and I am trying to piece together the boiler that I started 4 years ago. Wished I had internet then. Woulda helped out a lot on design. Will do and run what I have and let ya'll know the results. It may take a few more days to a week. Will let ya know when done.


                          From: jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@...>
                          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Sun, February 27, 2011 1:57:08 PM
                          Subject: [new_distillers] Re: disappointed?

                           

                          Calculating  potential ABV is simple if you first consult one of the brix to ABV charts aroud.  I use
                          http://www.brsquared.org/wine/CalcInfo/HydSugAl.htm for getting a ball park idea of amounts of sugar to use in a fermentation.  Tony also has a sugar to alcohol calculation on his site in the sugar wash section but its a bit high in its results.  Keeping the potential ABV below 16% results in  a smoother distillation and more flavors especially if making the brown stuff.

                          JB. aka Waldo.

                           

                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "witherspoon_q" <witherspoon_q@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > William,
                          >
                          > Because calculating the sugars available for fermentation would be painstakingly complicated I would first rely upon the Starting Specific Gravity. If unknown, then there is no telling what your potential yield will be. However, take the guesswork out of the equation and just wait it out. I've had the same problem before. I didn't get a good SG reading up front and had no clue as to what the potential was. I estimated a day when I thought the fermentation would be finished. Then, I let it sit and settle for another week. It was crystal clear when I racked it off and sent it to the still.
                          >
                          > I stripped it and ran a spirit run and ended up with a certain amount that was unpredictable.
                          >


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