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Re: Help With First Run of Pot Still

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  • Tom
    Z Bob, I will dutifully report! I can comment that at the time I fermented the cider, I made two (2)identical six-gallon batches. To one of the batches I
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 6, 2011
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      Z Bob,

      I will dutifully report!

      I can comment that at the time I fermented the cider, I made two (2)identical six-gallon batches. To one of the batches I added 1/4 cup of raw (partially unrefined or natural) cane sugar after it was completely dry. After priming it with the sugar, I bottled it in beer bottles. The second six gallon batch is the one that I will try to turn into Calvados. I can report that the batch that I put up in beer bottles went through a secondary fermentation, as intended, and after about six (6) weeks was lightly carbonated. It is absolutely wonderful!

      Next wear I plan to bottle-ferment at least 12 gallons of the same recipe.

      I sure hope the Calvados turns out. I ill report on the outcome

      Regards,

      Tom

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tom,
      >
      > Keep us posted on how it turns out. I think fruit brandies are the most
      > interesting things we can do. Good luck!
      >
      > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
      >
      >Snip
    • gff_stwrt
      Hi, Tom and folks, You can run it a second time; just addd sufficient water to be sure the elements are still covered after all the alcohol is collected. As to
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 11, 2011
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        Hi, Tom and folks,
        You can run it a second time; just addd sufficient water to be sure the elements are still covered after all the alcohol is collected.
        As to whether you would WANT to run it a second time, listen to Harry!
        Regards,
        The Baker

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
        >
        > To One and All,
        >
        > I am a newbie.

        snip

        I will be able to run it only once as my boiler is heated with two thermal elements and needs approximately three gallons (11.3 liters) of charge to ensure that the elements are completely covered.

        snip

        > Regards,
        >
        > Tom
        >
      • gff_stwrt
        Hi, Tom and hello folks, I would be terrified of adding sugar with the intent of causing a secondary fermentation, and bottling in BEER bottles. That is
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 11, 2011
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          Hi, Tom and hello folks,
          I would be terrified of adding sugar with the intent of causing a secondary fermentation, and bottling in BEER bottles.
          That is exactly the method used for Champagne, and they bottle in strengthened bottles with wired-down corks.
          Regards,
          The (nervous) Baker

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
          >
          > Z Bob,
          >
          > I will dutifully report!
          >
          > I can comment that at the time I fermented the cider, I made two (2)identical six-gallon batches. To one of the batches I added 1/4 cup of raw (partially unrefined or natural) cane sugar after it was completely dry. After priming it with the sugar, I bottled it in beer bottles. The second six gallon batch is the one that I will try to turn into Calvados. I can report that the batch that I put up in beer bottles went through a secondary fermentation, as intended, and after about six (6) weeks was lightly carbonated. It is absolutely wonderful!
          >
          > Next wear I plan to bottle-ferment at least 12 gallons of the same recipe.
          >
          > I sure hope the Calvados turns out. I ill report on the outcome
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Tom
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Tom,
          > >
          > > Keep us posted on how it turns out. I think fruit brandies are the most
          > > interesting things we can do. Good luck!
          > >
          > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
          > >
          > >Snip
          >
        • Tom Hawk
          Baker, Adding priming sugar is the accepted method used when making beer, which must be carbonated in the bottle.  A controlled amount of sugar produces
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 11, 2011
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            Baker,
             
            Adding priming sugar is the accepted method used when making beer, which must be carbonated in the bottle.  A controlled amount of sugar produces carbonation in the bottles.  The proper quantity (usually 1/4 cup of corn sugar or equivalent)  must not be exceeded.  The practice is established and is safe as long as the primary fermentation has completely finished before adding the priming sugar.
             
            Tom


            From: gff_stwrt <gff_stwrt@...>
            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, January 11, 2011 5:29:32 AM
            Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Help With First Run of Pot Still

             

            Hi, Tom and hello folks,
            I would be terrified of adding sugar with the intent of causing a secondary fermentation, and bottling in BEER bottles.
            That is exactly the method used for Champagne, and they bottle in strengthened bottles with wired-down corks.
            Regards,
            The (nervous) Baker

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
            >
            > Z Bob,
            >
            > I will dutifully report!
            >
            > I can comment that at the time I fermented the cider, I made two (2)identical six-gallon batches. To one of the batches I added 1/4 cup of raw (partially unrefined or natural) cane sugar after it was completely dry. After priming it with the sugar, I bottled it in beer bottles. The second six gallon batch is the one that I will try to turn into Calvados. I can report that the batch that I put up in beer bottles went through a secondary fermentation, as intended, and after about six (6) weeks was lightly carbonated. It is absolutely wonderful!
            >
            > Next wear I plan to bottle-ferment at least 12 gallons of the same recipe.
            >
            > I sure hope the Calvados turns out. I ill report on the outcome
            >
            > Regards,
            >
            > Tom
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Tom,
            > >
            > > Keep us posted on how it turns out. I think fruit brandies are the most
            > > interesting things we can do. Good luck!
            > >
            > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
            > >
            > >Snip
            >


          • Tom
            To All, I should have stated that the usual dose of priming sugar, in my experience, is 1/4 cup of corn sugar or equivalent per five (5) gallons (19 liters) of
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 11, 2011
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              To All,

              I should have stated that the usual dose of priming sugar, in my experience, is 1/4 cup of corn sugar or equivalent per five (5) gallons (19 liters) of completely fermented beer.

              Tom

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Tom Hawk <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
              >
              > Baker,
              >
              > Adding priming sugar is the accepted method used when making beer, which must be
              > carbonated in the bottle.  A controlled amount of sugar produces carbonation in
              > the bottles.  The proper quantity (usually 1/4 cup of corn sugar or equivalent)
              >  must not be exceeded.  The practice is established and is safe as long as the
              > primary fermentation has completely finished before adding the priming sugar.
              >
              > Tom
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: gff_stwrt <gff_stwrt@...>
              > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Tue, January 11, 2011 5:29:32 AM
              > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Help With First Run of Pot Still
              >
              >  
              > Hi, Tom and hello folks,
              > I would be terrified of adding sugar with the intent of causing a secondary
              > fermentation, and bottling in BEER bottles.
              > That is exactly the method used for Champagne, and they bottle in strengthened
              > bottles with wired-down corks.
              > Regards,
              > The (nervous) Baker
              >
              > Snip
            • tgfoitwoods
              Geoff, Let me put your terrors at rest [:))] . As a long time beer brewer, I can tell you with certainty that carbonation in beer bottles by secondary
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 11, 2011
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                Geoff,

                Let me put your terrors at rest :)). As a long time beer brewer, I can tell you with certainty that carbonation in beer bottles by secondary fermentation is entirely safe IF the amount of sugar added is no more than 3/4 cup to 5 US gallons of beer, and IF the primary fermentation is entirely complete.

                This kind of carbonation by fermentation in beers is called "bottle conditioning", is very commonly done, and is the only way most bottlers have to carbonate their beer. Although all my friends and relatives are keggers not bottlers, I'm still the holdout bottler (and mightily looked down on, I might add). My lifestyle and the amount I drink makes bottling the perfect solution.

                You are quite correct that champagne bottles can hold way more pressure than beer bottles, and in a couple of weeks I'll be trying to bottle condition a kit Johannesberger Riesling in champagne bottles. I'm not going to try that silly-ass "methode champenoise" which looks like Laurel and Hardy winning Talledega; I'll just leave the conditioning yeast "mouse turds" in the bottom of the bottle. It won't travel for that reason, but you can't have everything.

                Hope this helps you feel better:)).

                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi, Tom and hello folks,
                > I would be terrified of adding sugar with the intent of causing a secondary fermentation, and bottling in BEER bottles.
                > That is exactly the method used for Champagne, and they bottle in strengthened bottles with wired-down corks.
                > Regards,
                > The (nervous) Baker
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" tomhawk412@ wrote:
                > >
                > > Z Bob,
                > >
                > > I will dutifully report!
                ----snip----
              • gff_stwrt
                ... Thanks for that, Tom. The Baker
                Message 7 of 11 , Jan 11, 2011
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                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Tom Hawk <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Baker,
                  >
                  > Adding priming sugar is the accepted method used when making beer, which must be
                  > carbonated in the bottle.  A controlled amount of sugar produces carbonation in
                  > the bottles.  The proper quantity (usually 1/4 cup of corn sugar or equivalent)
                  >  must not be exceeded.  The practice is established and is safe as long as the
                  > primary fermentation has completely finished before adding the priming sugar.
                  >
                  > Tom

                  Thanks for that, Tom.
                  The Baker
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