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reflux still detuning

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  • adam
    I ve got a two inch stainless column about 30 inches tall. Has a reflux jacket on the column. I wanna run for some Bourbon and whiskey. Anyone have suggestions
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 5, 2011
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      I've got a two inch stainless column about 30 inches tall. Has a reflux jacket on the column. I wanna run for some Bourbon and whiskey. Anyone have suggestions on how they would run this.? Should I just hook up hoses to the condenser or would you run the reflux jacket too? Would some copper mesh packed loose be preferable or none.? Anyone's suggestions will be appreciated.
    • jamesonbeam1
      Hi Adam, If ya want to keep the flavors of the corn and grains, then you need to run you column in a de-refluxed or low seperation mode. This is done by
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 6, 2011
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        Hi Adam,

        If ya want to keep the flavors of the corn and grains, then you need to
        run you column in a de-refluxed or "low seperation" mode. This is done
        by taking out the copper mesh packing, turning off the reflux condenser
        and just running the distillation thru the columm with just the external
        condenser going. Keep it as close to a single or double distillation
        pot still mode as possible. By keeping the initial distillation at a
        low ABV, say below 120 to 130 proof, you can retain all those flavors.

        For the first distillation, do a stipping run and just run everything
        thru down thru the tails and get as much ethanol out as possible. Then
        your next run, do a spirits run where you discard the foreshots and make
        your cuts. I would first make sure that your first distillation is no
        more then 30 to 35% ABV (dilute it with eith the backset or water), so
        you dont go above 150 to 160 proof on the second distillation which is
        the US maximum level by law allowed for Bourbons and whiskeys.

        For making you cuts, follow ZB's *Zymurgy Bob's outline in the previous
        postings on making Calvados.

        If your going to age it and not imbibe it as white lightening, then cut
        it down to around 125 proof for aging on a good alligator charred oak.

        Good Luck.

        JB. aka Waldo.


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "adam" <bluwater2828@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've got a two inch stainless column about 30 inches tall. Has a
        reflux jacket on the column. I wanna run for some Bourbon and whiskey.
        Anyone have suggestions on how they would run this.? Should I just hook
        up hoses to the condenser or would you run the reflux jacket too? Would
        some copper mesh packed loose be preferable or none.? Anyone's
        suggestions will be appreciated.
        >
      • Tom
        JB, I m rather new to this hobby. I have read about diluting the still charge for the second run. I think I understand the principle, especially if the still
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 6, 2011
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          JB,

          I'm rather new to this hobby. I have read about diluting the still charge for the second run. I think I understand the principle, especially if the still is a reflux unit and the desired product is a neutral alcohol. However, it seems that if the charge is diluted with water for the spirit run for a corn whisky or other whisky that has "flavor" why doesn't the dilution with water also dilute the flavor aspect of the product?

          Thanks,

          Tom

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi Adam,
          >
          > If ya want to keep the flavors of the corn and grains, then you need to
          > run you column in a de-refluxed or "low seperation" mode. This is done
          > by taking out the copper mesh packing, turning off the reflux condenser
          > and just running the distillation thru the columm with just the external
          > condenser going. Keep it as close to a single or double distillation
          > pot still mode as possible. By keeping the initial distillation at a
          > low ABV, say below 120 to 130 proof, you can retain all those flavors.
          >
          > For the first distillation, do a stipping run and just run everything
          > thru down thru the tails and get as much ethanol out as possible. Then
          > your next run, do a spirits run where you discard the foreshots and make
          > your cuts. I would first make sure that your first distillation is no
          > more then 30 to 35% ABV (dilute it with eith the backset or water), so
          > you dont go above 150 to 160 proof on the second distillation which is
          > the US maximum level by law allowed for Bourbons and whiskeys.
          >
          > For making you cuts, follow ZB's *Zymurgy Bob's outline in the previous
          > postings on making Calvados.
          >
          > If your going to age it and not imbibe it as white lightening, then cut
          > it down to around 125 proof for aging on a good alligator charred oak.
          >
          > Good Luck.
          >
          > JB. aka Waldo.
        • Harry
          ... Hydroseparation only acts to separate out fusel oils (they float) and any solids eg dead yeast, protein (they sink) carried over by entrainment in the
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 6, 2011
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            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
            >
            > JB,
            >
            > I'm rather new to this hobby. I have read about diluting the still charge for the second run. I think I understand the principle, especially if the still is a reflux unit and the desired product is a neutral alcohol. However, it seems that if the charge is diluted with water for the spirit run for a corn whisky or other whisky that has "flavor" why doesn't the dilution with water also dilute the flavor aspect of the product?
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Tom



            "Hydroseparation" only acts to separate out fusel oils (they float) and any solids eg dead yeast, protein (they sink) carried over by entrainment in the stripping run. That's why we take the middle 1/3rd (free of the contaminants) as the subsequent charge for the spirit run (the 2nd run).


            Slainte!
            regards Harry

            http://distillers.tastylime.net
          • Tom
            Harry, My concern is less directed toward hydroseparation and more directed toward dillution of the still charge proper. In the archive section, theis an
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 7, 2011
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              Harry,

              My concern is less directed toward hydroseparation and more directed toward dillution of the still charge proper. In the archive section, theis an article "Diluting The Still Charge" (was that article written by you). As I understand the discussion, it suggests diluting the charge in the spirit run to the necessary % ABV to yield the desired % ABV from the spirit run based on the Alcohol Vapor vs Temperature plot. It seems to me that much of the flavor would be lost due to the dilution and that such a practice would apply only to a neutral run and not to a "flavored" run.

              As an example; if I wanted to run my Calvados a second time to increase the % ABV it seems reasonable that I would use 100% of the first run's output without dilution or risk a loss of flavor by dilluting the charge.

              What am I missing?

              Thanks,

              Tom

              SNIP>
              >
              >
              > "Hydroseparation" only acts to separate out fusel oils (they float) and any solids eg dead yeast, protein (they sink) carried over by entrainment in the stripping run. That's why we take the middle 1/3rd (free of the contaminants) as the subsequent charge for the spirit run (the 2nd run).
              >
              >
              > Slainte!
              > regards Harry
              >
              > http://distillers.tastylime.net
              >
            • Harry
              ... Yes Tom it is my article and Library. The more times you distill any batch, the more you risk reducing those hard-won flavours. Sometimes this can be a
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 7, 2011
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                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
                >
                > Harry,
                >
                > My concern is less directed toward hydroseparation and more directed toward dillution of the still charge proper. In the archive section, theis an article "Diluting The Still Charge" (was that article written by you). As I understand the discussion, it suggests diluting the charge in the spirit run to the necessary % ABV to yield the desired % ABV from the spirit run based on the Alcohol Vapor vs Temperature plot. It seems to me that much of the flavor would be lost due to the dilution and that such a practice would apply only to a neutral run and not to a "flavored" run.
                >
                > As an example; if I wanted to run my Calvados a second time to increase the % ABV it seems reasonable that I would use 100% of the first run's output without dilution or risk a loss of flavor by dilluting the charge.
                >
                > What am I missing?
                >
                > Thanks,
                >
                > Tom


                Yes Tom it is my article and Library. The more times you distill any batch, the more you risk reducing those hard-won flavours. Sometimes this can be a good thing to reduce harshness (rums & whiskies). But in your case (Calvados) I believe it will not be useful. Calvados is an eau de vie, a fruit brandy. Most of this class of spirits require specific equipment & techniques to achieve the desired outcome. But having said that, there are those here who do this spirit. I don't do Calvados so I can only tell you what others here have done over the years.

                I believe many people distill Calvados just the once, and age in wood for several years to achieve the colour & balance. If it requires more strength before casking, they fortify it by adding a completely neutral spirit made from grape.

                For all fruit-based brandies, may I suggest you read Prof. Kris Berglund's nethods in his book "Artisan Distilling", in my Library. This is considered to be the definitive guide for fruit spirits crafting. There's a bookmarked version (use the toolbar options) in the older archives section.

                HTH

                Slainte!
                regards Harry
              • Tom
                Harry, Thanks for the information. I will read the suggested book and will try my hand at the Calvados. Thanks for all your help. Tom SNIP
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 7, 2011
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                  Harry,

                  Thanks for the information. I will read the suggested book and will try my hand at the Calvados.

                  Thanks for all your help.

                  Tom

                  SNIP

                  > For all fruit-based brandies, may I suggest you read Prof. Kris Berglund's nethods in his book "Artisan Distilling", in my Library. This is considered to be the definitive guide for fruit spirits crafting. There's a bookmarked version (use the toolbar options) in the older archives section.
                  >
                  > HTH
                  >
                  > Slainte!
                  > regards Harry
                  >
                • diego.cerveza
                  Hi Harry, How can I access your library to read some books?
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 11, 2011
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                    Hi Harry, How can I access your library to read some books?

                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Harry,
                    > >
                    > > My concern is less directed toward hydroseparation and more directed toward dillution of the still charge proper. In the archive section, theis an article "Diluting The Still Charge" (was that article written by you). As I understand the discussion, it suggests diluting the charge in the spirit run to the necessary % ABV to yield the desired % ABV from the spirit run based on the Alcohol Vapor vs Temperature plot. It seems to me that much of the flavor would be lost due to the dilution and that such a practice would apply only to a neutral run and not to a "flavored" run.
                    > >
                    > > As an example; if I wanted to run my Calvados a second time to increase the % ABV it seems reasonable that I would use 100% of the first run's output without dilution or risk a loss of flavor by dilluting the charge.
                    > >
                    > > What am I missing?
                    > >
                    > > Thanks,
                    > >
                    > > Tom
                    >
                    >
                    > Yes Tom it is my article and Library. The more times you distill any batch, the more you risk reducing those hard-won flavours. Sometimes this can be a good thing to reduce harshness (rums & whiskies). But in your case (Calvados) I believe it will not be useful. Calvados is an eau de vie, a fruit brandy. Most of this class of spirits require specific equipment & techniques to achieve the desired outcome. But having said that, there are those here who do this spirit. I don't do Calvados so I can only tell you what others here have done over the years.
                    >
                    > I believe many people distill Calvados just the once, and age in wood for several years to achieve the colour & balance. If it requires more strength before casking, they fortify it by adding a completely neutral spirit made from grape.
                    >
                    > For all fruit-based brandies, may I suggest you read Prof. Kris Berglund's nethods in his book "Artisan Distilling", in my Library. This is considered to be the definitive guide for fruit spirits crafting. There's a bookmarked version (use the toolbar options) in the older archives section.
                    >
                    > HTH
                    >
                    > Slainte!
                    > regards Harry
                    >
                  • Harry
                    ... Link is in my sig. Slainte! regards Harry http://distillers.tastylime.net
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 11, 2011
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                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "diego.cerveza" <diego_428@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi Harry, How can I access your library to read some books?
                      >


                      Link is in my sig.


                      Slainte!
                      regards Harry

                      http://distillers.tastylime.net
                    • diego.cerveza
                      Thanks Harry
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 12, 2011
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                        Thanks Harry

                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "diego.cerveza" <diego_428@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hi Harry, How can I access your library to read some books?
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        > Link is in my sig.
                        >
                        >
                        > Slainte!
                        > regards Harry
                        >
                        > http://distillers.tastylime.net
                        >
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