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Re: [new_distillers] Re: Cooking Mash

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  • Jerry McCullough
    Thanks all for the input. I think I will try all three suggestions, aluminum plate ( I can fabricate that), steam wand and dumping my corn mash into
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 15, 2010
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      Thanks all for the input. I think I will try all three suggestions, aluminum plate ( I can fabricate that), steam wand and dumping my corn mash into vigorously boiling water.  
      On the aluminum plate is it put inside or outside the pot?
      I will let everyone know which method or combinations of methods worked best.
       
      Thanks again

      --- On Wed, 12/15/10, missouri_bootlegger <siscoweb@...> wrote:

      From: missouri_bootlegger <siscoweb@...>
      Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Cooking Mash
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 8:04 AM
      0
       
      Snip

      I have the same pot burner set up I use a 3/8 in aluminum plate 14 in round it doesn't stop the scorching entirely but it helps I also use it under my still that's were I got it it came with it. I have some high temp epoxy to glue it on but then I would need more plates.
      what I am going to do is build a steam wand. Harry uses one and Copper Run micro distillery (near me) uses steam injection to gel there corn mash. I just have to collect all the parts yet.


    • Alex Castillo
      Hi Z Bob Can you complete the idea of how much malt of what type? two pounds of 6 row per 10 lbs cracked corn perhaps? How have you managed lautering?
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 15, 2010
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        Hi Z Bob

        Can you complete the idea of how much malt of what type? two pounds of 6 row per 10 lbs cracked corn perhaps? How have you managed lautering? straining bag? My experience with cracked corn have been very "unfortunalte" and the yields very poor (what yields you get?)

        In the other hand I think you mentioned somewhere (not here) you have a dunder pit. My experience is with fresh dunder, not aged. Now I´m beginning to create a dunder pit, but even when I have nature in my favor, instead I´m planning to infect it with known cultures to quicken aging reducing so months of normal dunder pits to fresh dunder times (not more than 6 weeks). In this event my concern is the impossibility(?) of recycling yeast, practice that I frequently use, since, leaving overseas (of US and Canada) my only handy yeast is bread´s, not the wine ones (which I´m now using) or the very expensive EDV. Can you tell us how you work with aged dunder? your results?

        Thanks,

        Alex
      • tgfoitwoods
        Hi Alex, I ll have to admit that I ve had bad luck converting a cracked-corn mash with barley malt, although 2 pounds in 10 is held to be a good number, and
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 15, 2010
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          Hi Alex,

          I'll have to admit that I've had bad luck converting a cracked-corn mash with barley malt, although 2 pounds in 10 is held to be a good number, and 6-row is still considered to have higher diastatic power than 2-row, even though modern 2-row has greatly improved distatic power. I just flat-out cheat and use bottled enzymes...(somebody) and Barnes, I think.

          As for lautering, I do it, but I'm not overjoyed with the effort. I've used filter bags, paint filters, bags and wine presses (this was an impressive fuckup), and a perforated 5-gallon bucket, and any time I tried to hurry the lautering, it makes an idiot of me. (I have NOT tried rice hulls, which I have used in brewing; I'm sure they'll help, but I don't know how much) Because corn mash, at least in any consistency this side of peanut butter, is a low-ABV wash, my last batch was about 35 gallons, in a 55-gallon blue plastic drum. I found that if I push my perforated 5-gallon bucket into the mash, down until it's on the bottom, and come back in about a day, I can pump a lot of liquid from that bucket into my still. In a couple-three days I can get a 10-gallon charge in my 16-gallon still.

          The longer this process goes, the slower it gets, and after a while I just give up, but not before I've made some good corn whiskey. If I ever calculated yields, I've forgotten what they were.

          Because yeast is so cheap in the NW US, I've never re-used it.

          I haven't been brave enough to open my dunder pit (an 8-gallon fermenter) for about a year, and last time it wqas really ugly, but after I scooped all of the nasty stuff out, it smelled pretty good. I used it last to make up 30% of the liquid in my grain wash, and about 10% of the liquid in my diluted to 27% low wines. I'm really happy with the rich flavor in my later rums.

          I haven't intentionally infected my dunder, because there may not room for more critters in there. That, and I don't get to distill rum very often. I'm still working with the stuff I made a year ago, about 4 gallons of it.

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Alex Castillo" <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Z Bob
          >
          > Can you complete the idea of how much malt of what type? two pounds of 6 row per 10 lbs cracked corn perhaps? How have you managed lautering? straining bag? My experience with cracked corn have been very "unfortunalte" and the yields very poor (what yields you get?)
          >
          > In the other hand I think you mentioned somewhere (not here) you have a dunder pit. My experience is with fresh dunder, not aged. Now I´m beginning to create a dunder pit, but even when I have nature in my favor, instead I´m planning to infect it with known cultures to quicken aging reducing so months of normal dunder pits to fresh dunder times (not more than 6 weeks). In this event my concern is the impossibility(?) of recycling yeast, practice that I frequently use, since, leaving overseas (of US and Canada) my only handy yeast is bread´s, not the wine ones (which I´m now using) or the very expensive EDV. Can you tell us how you work with aged dunder? your results?
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Alex
          >
        • missouri_bootlegger
          ... Outside the pot to distribute the heat so it wont burn on the bottom
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 16, 2010
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            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Jerry McCullough <jkmccull@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks all for the input. I think I will try all three suggestions, aluminum plate ( I can fabricate that), steam wand and dumping my corn mash into vigorously boiling water.  
            >
            > On the aluminum plate is it put inside or outside the pot?
            >
            > I will let everyone know which method or combinations of methods worked best.
            >  
            > Thanks again
            >
            > --- On Wed, 12/15/10, missouri_bootlegger <siscoweb@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: missouri_bootlegger <siscoweb@...>
            > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Cooking Mash
            > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 8:04 AM
            > 0
            >  
            >
            Outside the pot to distribute the heat so it wont burn on the bottom

            >
            >
            > Snip
            >
            > I have the same pot burner set up I use a 3/8 in aluminum plate 14 in round it doesn't stop the scorching entirely but it helps I also use it under my still that's were I got it it came with it. I have some high temp epoxy to glue it on but then I would need more plates.
            > what I am going to do is build a steam wand. Harry uses one and Copper Run micro distillery (near me) uses steam injection to gel there corn mash. I just have to collect all the parts yet.
            >
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