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Re: QUIET

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  • Harry
    ... Mine also. But in my defense I gotta say, I can t be doing all these things at once. This is what I ve been up to (among other things (Hi Patch :; )...
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 11, 2010
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:

      > Some of that's gotta be my fault.



      Mine also.

      But in my defense I gotta say, I can't be doing all these things at once. This is what I've been up to (among other things (Hi Patch :; )...
      http://distillers.tastylime.net


      Check it out.

      ...added video streaming (quickplay, no waiting for d/l... similar to youtube). Revamped the Library layout, added more books, got downloads (borrow books) happening sometime real soon, courtesy of Drumlin Security (UK) who listened to my ideas (thanks Mike de Smith) & are now altering their DRM Software to suit time-limiting downloads.

      Also incorporated the old Library section into archives so we don't lose all that valuable stuff. Lots more to come when I can find the time (more articles & books, maybe a little stillin' music?). I might even find a few minutes to run a batch...maybe get wobbly-boot too.

      Guys I gotta say...if you can't find what you're looking for here in the one location, then I dunno what else to say. There's never been a resource like this on the 'net before, and there probably won't be again any time soon. All Gratis! ENJOY!!


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • tgfoitwoods
      ... question is ... luck. ... Donna, It s important to make the distinction between plain barley, and barley malt. The malted barley has gone through a
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 11, 2010
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Donna Convery <dnnconvery@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thank you for the information on the barley, guess my only other question is
        > where would I get it, I have tried to find barley locally, but no luck.
        > Donna in ky
        >
        >
        Donna,

        It's important to make the distinction between plain barley, and barley malt. The malted barley has gone through a sprouting and kilning process (malting) that creates the enzymes that convert starch to sugar.

        Since barley malt is the basic ingredient of ordinary beer, even if the brewer only uses a syrup or powder of the sugars extracted from that barley malt, the best place to buy barley malt is in a homebrew supply store.

        In that store, you'll find 2 basic types of barley malt, brewing grains, and specialty grains. Brewing grains are the majority of grains used in a beer (or malt whisky) batch, and contain the starches and enzymes to make the beer process happen. Specialty grains have little or no enzymes, but are used for flavor, mouthfeel, color, and head retention by the brewer.

        I don't know if you have homebrew supply stores in your area; here on the Left Coast, pretty much every city has one or more, and they're wonderful places. To get an idea, go to http://store.homebrewheaven.com/storefront.aspx. I bet they'll ship anywhere in the country.

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
      • Ric Cunningham
        The best place to find malted barley is at a Homebrewing supply store. If you can t find one in your area then there are plenty of suppliers online. My
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 11, 2010
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          The best place to find malted barley is at a Homebrewing supply store. If you can't find one in your area then there are plenty of suppliers online. My favorite for online/phone purchase is Niagara Tradition Homebrewing (www.nthomebrew.com). I know the staff (was once one of them). They have access to any kind of malted barley you could want and will ship anywhere in the US promptly.

          On Sat, Dec 11, 2010 at 3:01 AM, Donna Convery <dnnconvery@...> wrote:
           

          Thank you for the information on the barley, guess my only other question is where would I get it, I have tried to find barley locally, but no luck.
          Donna in ky


          From: Ric Cunningham <wilypig@...>Sent: Fri, December 10, 2010 11:49:35 PM
          Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: Corn Mash

           

          What do you want to know about Barley Malt. 

          Malted barley has sufficient enzymes to convert not only the starches that it contains but plenty of adjunct (corn or rice) starches. Due to the husk of the barley on the barley it makes lautering (separating the solids from the liquids) easier by creating a bit of a filter bed. When doing a cereal mash you should add a bit of barley to the mash (about 20 pecent) once the gelatinazation is complete (1 hour). Adjust the mash temperature to about 148 F to allow for more complete conversion to fermentable sugar vs high weight dextrins (unfermentable).

          There are many strains of barley used for malting and many different maltsers. North American brewers and Distillers have historically used a 6 row barley. Europeans have had ready access to 2 row varieties. 

          Corn has little to no enzymes even when malted and wheat when malted has enough enzymes to self convert but not enough to convert any additional adjuncts. 

          I hope this helps. 

          On Fri, Dec 10, 2010 at 4:09 PM, Donna Convery <dnnconvery@...> wrote:
           

          Can you tell me more about the Barley Malt? Thanks
          Donna in ky


          From: tgfoitwoods <zymurgybob@...>
          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Fri, December 10, 2010 3:31:56 PM
          Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Corn Mash

           


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "missouri_bootlegger" <siscoweb@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > I am trying to complete a corn mash and having a lot of trouble getting it to convert.
          >
          > 20 lbs finely ground corn
          > 2lbs barley malt
          > water added to bring total to 13 gal added 11-12 gal water
          > 15 gal pot with propane burner
          > this is pint o shine's recipe
          >
          > http://www.artisan-distiller.net/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=40
          >
          > I did the sour ferment I couldn't get to it so it sat for 6 days but is it around 60F in my basement it got sour.
          > I added 1/4 pound of malt to the mix wile heating but getting it to 180F was not easy it gelled about 170F and got so thick that I had to add hot water it would thin out for a bit then thicken back up it was sticking so bad and starting to burn I had to shut off the burner and boil water to add I did get it to 180F with the boiling water it was thick. I wrapped the pot with insulation and let it cool at 152F I added 2 lbs of malt and 1 tbs of alphaalmase and it thinned out. 10 hrs later it was 112F I did a iodine test "black" so I heated it back up to 154F and added another 1 tbs alphaalmase rewraped it and let it cool 9hrs later it is 120F and the test is black I am thinking I need to split it add more water and bring to 190F and hold for a wile any ideas?
          >
          Missouri,

          You are encountering all the classic corn-whiskey hassles. First off, I've never been able to get a clean no-starch iodine test, even when tasting indicated it was pretty well converted. While I don't have my notes handy, here are the procedures I use to avoid some of your hassles.

          First, I do pint's lacto-souring just like it sounds you did. Then I heat my water (sorry, no quantities now) to boiling and then add the pretty-dry soured corn. It will now take a lot less heat to get the mash to boiling, but if it's too thick to stir, add boiling water until you can live with it.

          Cover with a towel or other insulation to keep it hot while it gelatinizes, maybe an hour? Add cold water to get you down to 152 and thin that goop out a bit more. I don't use barley malt anymore, but when you add the enzymes and insulate with the towel for maybe 2 hours, the gloop will thin a bit more. Forget about the iodine test, add cold water to cool to yeast-pitching temps, and pitch your yeast starter. If at any point in the process the mixture is too thick to work, don't hesitate to add more water. Yes, that means a slightly lower-ABV wash, but I don't know what else to do. Just use any water additions to accomplish whatever temperature changes you need to make.

          When it comes time to lauter the wash off the grain, I personally feel that gravity and time are the best approach. Clever ways of applying pressure just seem to make the situation worse. I push a perforated bucket into the mash, down to the bottom of the barrel, and about every day pump the liquid out of the bucket until I have a still-full.

          If this seems like pain in the ass, you'd be right. I'm just happy that I still have a gallon or more of aged bourbon from last year, and that I prefer barley-malt whiskies to corn. (Barley is WAY easier to work with)

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller





          --
          If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.





          --
          If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
        • missouri_bootlegger
          ... Thanks for the info I added 2 gal of water bringing total volume to 15 gal and got it up to temp. What a pain Hopefully I wont have to do this too often
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 11, 2010
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            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Donna Convery <dnnconvery@...> wrote:
            >
            > Can you tell me more about the Barley Malt? Thanks
            > Donna in ky
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: tgfoitwoods <zymurgybob@...>
            > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Fri, December 10, 2010 3:31:56 PM
            > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Corn Mash
            >
            >  
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "missouri_bootlegger" <siscoweb@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > I am trying to complete a corn mash and having a lot of trouble getting it to
            > >convert.
            > >
            > >
            > > 20 lbs finely ground corn
            > > 2lbs barley malt
            > > water added to bring total to 13 gal added 11-12 gal water
            > > 15 gal pot with propane burner
            > > this is pint o shine's recipe
            > >
            > > http://www.artisan-distiller.net/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=40
            > >
            > > I did the sour ferment I couldn't get to it so it sat for 6 days but is it
            > >around 60F in my basement it got sour.
            > > I added 1/4 pound of malt to the mix wile heating but getting it to 180F was
            > >not easy it gelled about 170F and got so thick that I had to add hot water it
            > >would thin out for a bit then thicken back up it was sticking so bad and
            > >starting to burn I had to shut off the burner and boil water to add I did get it
            > >to 180F with the boiling water it was thick. I wrapped the pot with insulation
            > >and let it cool at 152F I added 2 lbs of malt and 1 tbs of alphaalmase and it
            > >thinned out. 10 hrs later it was 112F I did a iodine test "black" so I heated it
            > >back up to 154F and added another 1 tbs alphaalmase rewraped it and let it cool
            > >9hrs later it is 120F and the test is black I am thinking I need to split it add
            > >more water and bring to 190F and hold for a wile any ideas?
            > >
            > Missouri,
            >
            > You are encountering all the classic corn-whiskey hassles. First off, I've never
            > been able to get a clean no-starch iodine test, even when tasting indicated it
            > was pretty well converted. While I don't have my notes handy, here are the
            > procedures I use to avoid some of your hassles.
            >
            > First, I do pint's lacto-souring just like it sounds you did. Then I heat my
            > water (sorry, no quantities now) to boiling and then add the pretty-dry soured
            > corn. It will now take a lot less heat to get the mash to boiling, but if it's
            > too thick to stir, add boiling water until you can live with it.
            >
            >
            > Cover with a towel or other insulation to keep it hot while it gelatinizes,
            > maybe an hour? Add cold water to get you down to 152 and thin that goop out a
            > bit more. I don't use barley malt anymore, but when you add the enzymes and
            > insulate with the towel for maybe 2 hours, the gloop will thin a bit more.
            > Forget about the iodine test, add cold water to cool to yeast-pitching temps,
            > and pitch your yeast starter. If at any point in the process the mixture is too
            > thick to work, don't hesitate to add more water. Yes, that means a slightly
            > lower-ABV wash, but I don't know what else to do. Just use any water additions
            > to accomplish whatever temperature changes you need to make.
            >
            > When it comes time to lauter the wash off the grain, I personally feel that
            > gravity and time are the best approach. Clever ways of applying pressure just
            > seem to make the situation worse. I push a perforated bucket into the mash, down
            > to the bottom of the barrel, and about every day pump the liquid out of the
            > bucket until I have a still-full.
            >
            > If this seems like pain in the ass, you'd be right. I'm just happy that I still
            > have a gallon or more of aged bourbon from last year, and that I prefer
            > barley-malt whiskies to corn. (Barley is WAY easier to work with)
            >
            > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
            >
            Thanks for the info I added 2 gal of water bringing total volume to 15 gal and got it up to temp. What a pain
            Hopefully I wont have to do this too often
            Missouri Bootlegger
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