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Re: [new_distillers] trying to make a corn mash

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  • Ric Cunningham
    Depending on the volumes you are using you could use a cooler as the mash vessel. As a home beer maker this is what I use and I can hold temperature within 2
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 3, 2010
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      Depending on the volumes you are using you could use a cooler as the mash vessel. As a home beer maker this is what I use and I can hold temperature within 2 degrees for an hour after mash in. Just do the cereal mash in a pot on a turkey fryer burner and mix in a cooler with the malt and let it rest. You can lauter it(separate the liquid from the solids) or just ferment on the solids if you like


      On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 5:31 AM, big mike <micael1802@...> wrote:
       

      ih i am makeing a corn mash i by crack corn from farm and fleat and cook it up to 152f then add my malt cool it down i dont add any suger and its works ok i want to inceres my yeld what can i do
      qustion i live in wisconsin its cold what the best way to keep it worm in the winter in the house is not going to happen i have been told
      sorry about my spelling


    • *
      ... if you want better yield i think you need to get you corn above 165*f for a couple hours to gelatinize the starches. then pitch malt at 152-158*F range for
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 3, 2010
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Ric Cunningham <wilypig@...> wrote:
        >
        > Depending on the volumes you are using you could use a cooler as the mash
        > vessel. As a home beer maker this is what I use and I can hold temperature
        > within 2 degrees for an hour after mash in. Just do the cereal mash in a pot
        > on a turkey fryer burner and mix in a cooler with the malt and let it rest.
        > You can lauter it(separate the liquid from the solids) or just ferment on
        > the solids if you like
        >
        >
        > On Fri, Dec 3, 2010 at 5:31 AM, big mike <micael1802@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > >
        > > ih i am makeing a corn mash i by crack corn from farm and fleat and cook it
        > > up to 152f then add my malt cool it down i dont add any suger and its works
        > > ok i want to inceres my yeld what can i do
        > > qustion i live in wisconsin its cold what the best way to keep it worm in
        > > the winter in the house is not going to happen i have been told
        > > sorry about my spelling
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        if you want better yield i think you need to get you corn above 165*f for a couple hours to gelatinize the starches. then pitch malt at 152-158*F range for 2 hrs
      • jamesonbeam1
        Mike, If your talking about keeping the temp in the 150 s for the hour or so of mashing, then wrap some towels around the boiler or adjust the heat to keep it
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 4, 2010
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          Mike,

          If your talking about keeping the temp in the 150's for the hour or so
          of mashing, then wrap some towels around the boiler or adjust the heat
          to keep it at that temp.

          If your talking about keeping the fermentation in the 70's, which is
          ideal for fermentation, then I have found one of those electric heat
          blankets or bed warmers (for water beds) works very well if wrapped
          around the fermenter.

          JB.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "big mike" <micael1802@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > ih i am makeing a corn mash i by crack corn from farm and fleat and
          cook it up to 152f then add my malt cool it down i dont add any suger
          and its works ok i want to inceres my yeld what can i do
          > qustion i live in wisconsin its cold what the best way to keep it worm
          in the winter in the house is not going to happen i have been told
          > sorry about my spelling
          >
        • jamesonbeam1
          Sidenote, I agree with Goodneighbor, tis better to let it sit around 158-160F for an hour or more. its above the 165 to 170F that causes the enzymes to lose
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 4, 2010
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            Sidenote,

            I agree with Goodneighbor, tis better to let it sit around 158-160F for
            an hour or more. its above the 165 to 170F that causes the enzymes to
            lose their power.

            JB.
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