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Re: [new_distillers] Re: Yeast & oxygen

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  • Richard Miller
    Thanks JB and Harry.  Great help. ________________________________ From: jamesonbeam1 To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed,
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 24, 2010
      Thanks JB and Harry.  Great help.


      From: jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@...>
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, November 24, 2010 6:06:25 PM
      Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Yeast & oxygen

       

      Hello Kentucky,

      Welcome aboard.  A good source for understanding the phases in yeast growth is Dr. MB Raines-Casselman's "Yeast Propagation and Maintenance" at  http://www.maltosefalcons.com/tech/yeast-propagation-and-maintenance-principles-and-practices

      This is a good discussion of the aerobic growth phase where the yeast first needs oxygen to multiply, and then the anaerobic (no oxygen) stationary phase, where the yeast converts the sugars to alcohol and CO2.

      JB.

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "kentuckybrew" <rmillerfly@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am a newbie and have tried to answer my own question by searching the files and documents:
      >
      > What is the impact of oxygen upon yeast during the fermentation process?
      >
      > I have a pot still and have produced a half dozen batches of alcohol using basic sugar washes and filter them with activated charcoal. I recently experimented running wine through. Now, I'm expanding into my first try using a mash recipe. I've started with the recipe for bourbon wiskey (like Jim Beam) in the "files" section of this group.
      >
      > In the bourbon wiskey recipe the mash should be sealed with an airlock. However, I notice in other documents I'm reading about fermenting mashes that airating with an aquariam air pump 4 30 minutes is recommended and then to stir in the "cap" that occurs during fermentation a couple times a day.
      >
      > It seems that in the first case oxygen is eliminated or minimized and in the second, oxygen is maximized. I could use some help on understanding this one.
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > KentuckyBrew
      >


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