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Re: [new_distillers] Re: Backsweeting - a wine question

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  • Jerry McCullough
    Little to late to fix the white zinfadel. Only have 3 bottles left. It actually went over quite well with my family and friends I gave it to.   I have about 5
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 23, 2010
      Little to late to fix the white zinfadel. Only have 3 bottles left. It actually went over quite well with my family and friends I gave it to.
       
      I have about 5 gallons of peach wine, that I am aging . Again the wine is a little sour for the audience that will drink it. I will back sweeten the peacxh wine, let it sit on an airlock until next june, then kill the yeast with a crushed campden tablet and bottle next july. Then I will wait and see what happens.   
       
      Hope this answered your question.
       
      --- On Sat, 11/13/10, jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:

      From: jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@...>
      Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Backsweeting - a wine question
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, November 13, 2010, 12:51 PM

       

      Jerry,

      Could ya give us a clue which way your going to fix it? Just curious.

      JB.

      BTW Harry, ZB is also a well professed wine maker and even has his own
      little vinyard.. (and gave the same recommendation I did.)

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Jerry McCullough <jkmccull@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > It looks to me that my question got answered in a high class way. I
      know what to do now.
      >
      > Thanks.
      > Â
      >
      > --- On Wed, 11/10/10, Harry gnikomson2000@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Harry gnikomson2000@...
      > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Backsweeting - a wine question
      > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 6:31 PM
      >
      > Fermentation...it ain't over 'till it's over Jerry.
      >
      > Seriously I know bugger all about winemaking. But there's plenty on
      here who do. Our mod Jim is one. There's also a heap of books in the
      Library you could refer to. But at a guess I'd say you need to
      pasteurise your wine before bottling, to kill any yeasts, particularly
      if you've added a sweetener (sugar is a yeast food & growth item).
      >
      > I did a quick google and found this...
      >
      > How to Kill Wine Yeast
      > By Anna Roberts, eHow Contributor
      > updated: January 14, 2010
      >
      > Yeast is a necessary component in wine-making, but at a certain point,
      the yeast fermentation must be stopped. When fermentation is finished,
      some yeast still remains in the wine. If it is not killed before
      bottling, it can result in further fermentation, turning your hard work
      to vinegar, breaking bottles or blowing corks. There are four ways to
      kill the wine yeast to stop fermentation.
      >
      > Instructions.
      >
      > 1
      > Let the yeast starve. In this method, you simply let the yeast consume
      all of the sugar until there is nothing left to eat, at which point it
      simply starves. This will produce a dry wine. To get a sweet wine, stop
      fermentation sooner, before all the sugar has been converted. You may
      also sweeten the wine again after all the yeast is dead, without fear of
      restarting fermentation.
      >
      > 2
      > Heat the wine to 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 10 minutes. The yeast
      cannot survive this pasteurization process. Be aware that the cooking
      method of killing yeast can yield unpredictable changes to the taste of
      the wine.
      >
      > 3
      > Add sulfites or sorbates (usually Campden tablets and potassium
      sorbate) to the wine. This is how commercial wines are usually
      stabilized, but keep in mind that some people are allergic to sulfites.
      Use one crushed Campden tablet per gallon of wine. Use a half teaspoon
      of potassium sorbate per gallon of wine.
      >
      > 4
      > Let the alcohol kill the yeast. Yeast can only live in an environment
      with a certain amount of alcohol. Wine yeasts in particular can only
      survive up to about 6 or 8 percent alcohol.
      > .
      >
      > Read more: How to Kill Wine Yeast | eHow.com
      http://www.ehow.com/how_5867337_kill-wine-yeast.html#ixzz14vfAQUxM
      >
      > HTH
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry
      > http://distillers.tastylime.net
      >


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