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Re: [new_distillers] Re:corn

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  • Ric Cunningham
    Sounds like you are not getting very good extract conversion in the original mash. You will need a few pounds of malted barley for diastatic enzymes to get
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 11, 2010
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      Sounds like you are not getting very good extract conversion in the original mash. You will need a few pounds of malted barley for diastatic enzymes to get good conversion of starches to sugar. 

      On Thu, Nov 11, 2010 at 11:16 AM, missouri_bootlegger <siscoweb@...> wrote:
       

      My biggest problem has been conversion rates the recipes say they get 1.070-1.090sg and I get 1.020-1.030sg I don't get much alcohol from a 5 gal mash. So I have invested in a bigger pot and fermenter. I have done one 10 gal mash using flaked wheat I got 1.034sg but used an old turbo the yeast was dead and I got a bacteria in it while I was waiting for it to start I repitched it but too late. I had to throw it out.
      The sugar washes I have no problem with and I have been spending lots of time getting better reflux distilling and pot distilling rum and JUSSM.
      I have a grinder and some corn now and I and going to do a corn mash next week. I do have a question what recipe would you start with?

      Thanks Michael


    • tgfoitwoods
      Michael, Have you used the iodine test to see if you have starch remaining in your mash? It sure sounds like you must have a lot. You didn t say, but what are
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 12, 2010
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        Michael,

        Have you used the iodine test to see if you have starch remaining in your mash? It sure sounds like you must have a lot. You didn't say, but what are the sources of your enzymes to convert the starch to sugar? Many malts, especially barley malts, will provide the enzymes you need, and malted corn may provide enough enzymes to convert its own starches, but no more than that. When I'm concerned about conversion, I use bottled enzymes from my LHBS, and they work beautifully.

        Another critical pair of factors in enzyme-catalyzed conversion is temperature and time. 150F and 2 hours usually does a great job, but if you get it too hot, you "kill" your enzymes and get bad conversion. Too cold, and it converts very slowly.

        Compared to conversion, the importance of a particular grain recipe is minor; any of the common grains, in just about any ratios, will make a fine spirit, if you do your part. If you've got corn and a grinder, a pure corn whiskey is wonderful. With corn, adjust the grinder to just open up the kernel, and boil it to gelatinize the starch, then cool to 150F and add whatever enzymes you choose. You'll probably have to dilute your cooked corn so you can deal with that goop.

        If I were you, I'd stay away from turbo yeast if you want your whiskey to taste good. It's expensive and you don't need it, and much of it has artificial chickenshit (urea) in it. A good ale yeast (I like Danstar Nottinhham) does a fine job with a bit of yeast nutrient. Hell, right now, at 1.030 you could use baker's yeast. I keep all my yeasts in a baggie in the kitchen refrigerator, and they last a long time.

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "missouri_bootlegger" <siscoweb@...> wrote:
        >
        > My biggest problem has been conversion rates the recipes say they get 1.070-1.090sg and I get 1.020-1.030sg I don't get much alcohol from a 5 gal mash. So I have invested in a bigger pot and fermenter. I have done one 10 gal mash using flaked wheat I got 1.034sg but used an old turbo the yeast was dead and I got a bacteria in it while I was waiting for it to start I repitched it but too late. I had to throw it out.
        > The sugar washes I have no problem with and I have been spending lots of time getting better reflux distilling and pot distilling rum and JUSSM.
        > I have a grinder and some corn now and I and going to do a corn mash next week. I do have a question what recipe would you start with?
        >
        > Thanks Michael
        >
      • jamesonbeam1
        Mike, Listen to ZB. I think you would be well off to make sure the corn (that is dried and very hard) is cooked good and the starches are nicely gelatinized
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 13, 2010
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          Mike,

          Listen to ZB. I think you would be well off to make sure the corn (that
          is dried and very hard) is cooked good and the starches are nicely
          gelatinized before mashing. Watch the mashing temp closely and dont go
          over about 165 F or so. An hour or 2 rest with towels wrapped around
          the pot should do the trick. Definitely use the iodine test to make
          sure all the starches have been converted.

          A nice recipe is about 6 parts corn, 2 parts rye (or wheat if you want a
          Maker's Mark style) and 2 parts good high disastatic barley malt (never
          hurts to add more barley malt).

          See Tony's section on this for the breakdown.

          JB.

          However, dont expect more then a 7 to 8% ABV fermentation, tis wise to
          invest in a larger boiler the way ZB did. Note: For higher yield, you
          can alwasys cheat and add some additional sugar prior to fermentation
          (Maltose or Dextrose (Glucose) is best). Just dont forget to save the
          backset for Sour Mash.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "missouri_bootlegger"
          <siscoweb@...> wrote:
          >
          > My biggest problem has been conversion rates the recipes say they get
          1.070-1.090sg and I get 1.020-1.030sg I don't get much alcohol from a 5
          gal mash. So I have invested in a bigger pot and fermenter. I have done
          one 10 gal mash using flaked wheat I got 1.034sg but used an old turbo
          the yeast was dead and I got a bacteria in it while I was waiting for it
          to start I repitched it but too late. I had to throw it out.
          > The sugar washes I have no problem with and I have been spending lots
          of time getting better reflux distilling and pot distilling rum and
          JUSSM.
          > I have a grinder and some corn now and I and going to do a corn mash
          next week. I do have a question what recipe would you start with?
          >
          > Thanks Michael
          >
        • nancy pevnick
          Any ideas on where to get reasonable priced non gmo corn near St. Louis? Nancy
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 12, 2013
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            Any ideas on where to get reasonable priced non gmo corn near St. Louis?
            Nancy
          • wzuccarello
            If you re going to distill the product of the corn I don t think it matters GMO or not. All the bad stuff is left behind in the boiler . ... Any ideas on where
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 12, 2013
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              If you're going to distill the product of the corn I don't think it matters GMO or not. All the bad stuff is left behind in the boiler .



              ---In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, <npevnick@...> wrote:

              Any ideas on where to get reasonable priced non gmo corn near St. Louis?
              Nancy
            • RLB
              Drive out of the city, and look for a a real feed store that sells bulk grains.  The bulk feed store in my area stocks 50 lbs bags of  whole corn, barley,
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 12, 2013
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                Drive out of the city, and look for a a real feed store that sells bulk grains.  The bulk feed store in my area stocks 50 lbs bags of  whole corn, barley, rye, wheat, oats, and buckwheat.  I am malting grain to sell, and they do ask a lot of questions why I am buying a half a ton of grain.  You may want to purchase grain at different store.  Another way is to purchase grain directly from the farmer. 


                From: "wzuccarello@..." <wzuccarello@...>
                To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Tuesday, November 12, 2013 11:12 PM
                Subject: [new_distillers] RE: corn

                 
                If you're going to distill the product of the corn I don't think it matters GMO or not. All the bad stuff is left behind in the boiler .


                ---In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, <npevnick@...> wrote:

                Any ideas on where to get reasonable priced non gmo corn near St. Louis?
                Nancy


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