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lees

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  • flakedmaize
    Could you please explain the lees and how to rack them off? Is this a way to reuse your yeast? The site is great, by the way. Thanks
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 16, 2010
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      Could you please explain the lees and how to rack them off? Is this a way to reuse your yeast? The site is great, by the way.
      Thanks
    • Ric Cunningham
      Lees/Trub is all the stuff that settles out after fermentation. This contains yeast, fruit bits (if using), protein bits and any number of other things. To
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 17, 2010
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        Lees/Trub is all the stuff that settles out after fermentation. This contains yeast, fruit bits (if using), protein bits and any number of other things. To 'rack' off of the lees you should allow fermentation to cease and let gravity do its thing or cold crash to about 1 C / 35 F for a day or two. Then siphon off from the top until you get to the area of heaviest concentration. Homebrew shops have siphon starters with foot cones that allow to do this very easily. They are about $10 US generally. A great tool in the brew house. 

        On Thu, Sep 16, 2010 at 9:47 PM, flakedmaize <stonearchapiaries@...> wrote:
         

        Could you please explain the lees and how to rack them off? Is this a way to reuse your yeast? The site is great, by the way.
        Thanks


      • jamesonbeam1
        Hi Flaked, As Ric mentions, lees or trub are whats deposited on the bottom of the fermenter during fermentation. As the yeast multiply and consume all the
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 17, 2010
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          Hi Flaked,

          As Ric mentions, lees or trub are whats deposited on the bottom of the
          fermenter during fermentation. As the yeast multiply and consume all
          the available sugars, they "flocculate" to the bottom of the fermenter
          along with other solids as the fermentation finishes and begins to
          clear.

          An easy method of removing the clear fermentation off of the lees is
          with a "racking stick" which is nothing more then a plastic pipe with a
          hole a few inches from the bottom attached to a siphon hose, allowing
          you to siphon it off.

          There are many uses for this stuff. It is the basis for yeast extract
          which is very nutritional and also used in making vegemite (if your from
          downunder) or marmite as its called in the UK, South Africa and New
          Zealand - a type of sandwitch spread.

          If it is refrigerated or harvested soon after the finish of a
          fermentation, it can be used to start a new fermentation without adding
          new yeast. This is extensively practiced in the Sour mash corn Whiskey
          and Rum industries. I also use this approach to increase fermentation
          speed for my JEM sugar wash.

          Many distillers also will take some of this trub and boil it up as
          nutrients for the next fermentation.

          JB.

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "flakedmaize"
          <stonearchapiaries@...> wrote:
          >
          > Could you please explain the lees and how to rack them off? Is this a
          way to reuse your yeast? The site is great, by the way.
          > Thanks
          >
        • thursty2
          A little late on this subject, but here is a link to further info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lees_%28fermentation%29
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 24, 2010
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            A little late on this subject, but here is a link to further info:

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lees_%28fermentation%29

            ---------------------

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "flakedmaize" <stonearchapiaries@...> wrote:
            >
            > Could you please explain the lees and how to rack them off? Is this a way to reuse your yeast? The site is great, by the way.
            > Thanks
            >
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