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Re: brandy?

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  • geoff burrows
    Hi Guys, While most of my Brandy post to Jim was correct, I was wrong about the Italian root resistant stock, fellow forum member memehlbaum wrote this and
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 10, 2010
      Hi Guys,
        While most of my "Brandy" post to Jim was correct, I was wrong about the Italian root resistant stock, fellow forum member "memehlbaum" wrote this and he is quite correct in what he says.(a couple of big unpronounceable words there and my mind kind of glosses over them when I read them,)   But bear in mind I read this about 2 years ago and am quoting from aged memory.  So thank you again "memehlbaum" it's best to keep these things accurate as other people may quote from my post
      Geoff
       
      "memehlbaum" wrote
       
      While you are correct that the phylloxera came from America,
      the rootstocks they used for grafting onto also came from
      America. These rootstocks were resistant because of their
      coexistence with said phylloxera. That is what saved the
      French wine industry. Lots of articles on the net.
           Mark
    • geoff burrows
      Hi Bob, I ve read your post but I ll get into the meat of it, if and when I get the grapes but thanks for your information and feed back as well. I was
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 11, 2010
        Hi Bob,
         I've read your post but I'll get into the meat of it, if and when I get the grapes but  thanks for your information and feed back as well.
               I was brought on the old British Imperial system at school, ounces, pounds, stones, hundredweights,(cwts), tons, and inches, links, feet, yards, rod pole or perch,(not often used even then), chains, furlongs, miles, etc. 
             I've always used this Imperial to Metric convertor rhyme "Two and a quarter pounds of jam weighs about a kilogram" and everyone should know one litre of clean clear water weighs exactly one kilogram and then do your guesstimations from there 
        Geoff  
      • jamesonbeam1
        Ah, Then those grapes are probably an older varietal type that was destroyed during the French wine blight around 1863 that killed off a large part of the
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 11, 2010
          Ah,

          Then those grapes are probably an older varietal type that was destroyed
          during the French wine blight around 1863 that killed off a large part
          of the vineyards and ruined the wine industry. Over 40% of the
          vineyards were destroyed during a 10 year period. Yes, the solution was
          to graft the remaining grapes onto aphid-resistant American vines.

          Now as far as alternatives to a wine press, you could go the traditional
          route and advertise for a couple of young ladies (I have heard virgins
          do best) and put the grapes in a trough and have the ladies stomp on
          them with their bare feet. Other then that, the old drill and paint
          paddle along with the 5 gallon strainer bag should work.

          Now as far as the brandy goes, I wouldn't use your first run stuff for
          it. Let it age as a wine. However, you have the option of taking the
          grape pomace from your squeezing and reconstitue it with water and
          sugar, then referment to make some nice Grappa if you want. There are
          many recipes in the archives.

          JB.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff burrows"
          <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi Jim,
          > Thanks for the recipes if the wine tastes good I'm afraid it won't get
          as far as Brandy
          > Geoff
          >
        • tgfoitwoods
          Geoff, I was brought up in conflict. All around me, in the US, were corns, inches, feet, yards, ounces (both Troy and Averdupois), US gallons, furlongs,
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 12, 2010
            Geoff,

            I was brought up in conflict. All around me, in the US, were corns, inches, feet, yards, ounces (both Troy and Averdupois), US gallons, furlongs, firkins, and all that stuff, but when I studied the sciences, it was all metric (later to become SI). Because we humans are rational beings, I knew it was only a matter of a short time before the US was all metric. After all, we already had decimal money, so we were halfway there.

            And you know how that worked out. :(

            About the same time I was learning that "conventional" current flow, positive to negative, was all a mistake (by Benjamin Franklin), and as soon as we got our wits about us, we'd all agree that real electricity, in the form of electrons, flows from negative to positive. Then we'd be all sorted out.

            I carried that vanity around with me for decades, but when I went back to school for an electrical engineering degree, they said, "We don't care about the facts - current flows from positive to negative".

            So now, mostly, I just shut up and try to use whatever units fall to hand.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff burrows" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Bob,
            > I've read your post but I'll get into the meat of it, if and when I get the grapes but thanks for your information and feed back as well.
            > I was brought on the old British Imperial system at school, ounces, pounds, stones, hundredweights,(cwts), tons, and inches, links, feet, yards, rod pole or perch,(not often used even then), chains, furlongs, miles, etc.
            > I've always used this Imperial to Metric convertor rhyme "Two and a quarter pounds of jam weighs about a kilogram" and everyone should know one litre of clean clear water weighs exactly one kilogram and then do your guesstimations from there
            > Geoff
            >
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