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solder question

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  • krp20042003
    Hello everyone, I m new to the group. Just wondering what the verdict is on bismuth? I am having trouble finding any lead free solder around here without
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 6, 2010
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      Hello everyone, I'm new to the group. Just wondering what the verdict is on bismuth?

      I am having trouble finding any lead free solder around here without antimony or selenium around here. I did find some that contains tin, copper, silver, and bismuth but I am not sure if this is o.k. to use. Thanks for any advice.
    • Steve Spence
      Hard silver solder (my solder of choice ) is 76% silver, with the rest being copper and zinc, both of which are considered nontoxic (in small doses). Steve
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 6, 2010
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        Hard silver solder (my solder of choice ) is 76% silver, with the rest
        being copper and zinc, both of which are considered nontoxic (in small
        doses).


        Steve Spence
        Renewable energy and self sufficiency
        http://www.green-trust.org
        http://arduinotronics.blogspot.com/



        On 09/06/2010 06:37 PM, krp20042003 wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hello everyone, I'm new to the group. Just wondering what the verdict is
        > on bismuth?
        >
        > I am having trouble finding any lead free solder around here without
        > antimony or selenium around here. I did find some that contains tin,
        > copper, silver, and bismuth but I am not sure if this is o.k. to use.
        > Thanks for any advice.
        >
        >
      • Rainero Morgia
        just  make  sure  it is  food  grade  or  certified-free of toxic metals  or  don t  use  it.  not  sure  what  percentage  composition  is 
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 6, 2010
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          just  make  sure  it is  food  grade  or  certified-free of toxic metals  or  don't  use  it.  not  sure  what  percentage  composition  is  bismuth  in  your  solder  material   but  generally  bismuth  has  a  low  vaporization  temperature,  thus  will  slowly  get  oxidized  and  also galvanic  corrosion  compatability  with  copper  or  stainless steel  is  not  good.  its  typical  application  are  for  low  melting  like  water-sprinklers,  etc..not  for  cooking..
          you  should  be  able  to  find  hard  silver  solder....
          --- On Mon, 9/6/10, krp20042003 <kcamadak@...> wrote:

          From: krp20042003 <kcamadak@...>
          Subject: [new_distillers] solder question
          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, September 6, 2010, 10:37 PM

           
          Hello everyone, I'm new to the group. Just wondering what the verdict is on bismuth?

          I am having trouble finding any lead free solder around here without antimony or selenium around here. I did find some that contains tin, copper, silver, and bismuth but I am not sure if this is o.k. to use. Thanks for any advice.


        • krp20042003
          I have also found some solder called Alpha Fry silver bearing solid wire but I can t seem to find a MSDS to see what the solder consists of. I never thought
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 6, 2010
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            I have also found some solder called
            "Alpha Fry silver bearing solid wire" but I can't seem to find a MSDS to see what the solder consists of. I never thought finding the right solder would be such a problem.




            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rainero Morgia <raineromorgia@...> wrote:
            >
            > just  make  sure  it is  food  grade  or  certified-free of toxic metals  or  don't  use  it.  not  sure  what  percentage  composition  is  bismuth  in  your  solder  material   but  generally  bismuth  has  a  low  vaporization  temperature,  thus  will  slowly  get  oxidized  and  also galvanic  corrosion  compatability  with  copper  or  stainless steel  is  not  good.  its  typical  application  are  for  low  melting  like  water-sprinklers,  etc..not  for  cooking..
            > you  should  be  able  to  find  hard  silver  solder....
            >
            > --- On Mon, 9/6/10, krp20042003 <kcamadak@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: krp20042003 <kcamadak@...>
            > Subject: [new_distillers] solder question
            > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Monday, September 6, 2010, 10:37 PM
            >
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            >
            > Hello everyone, I'm new to the group. Just wondering what the verdict is on bismuth?
            >
            > I am having trouble finding any lead free solder around here without antimony or selenium around here. I did find some that contains tin, copper, silver, and bismuth but I am not sure if this is o.k. to use. Thanks for any advice.
            >
          • Rainero Morgia
            yup..any  silver  bearing  solder  is  safe  to  use.  am  not  sure  what  type  of  alpha fry  you  have  but  in  your  product 
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 7, 2010
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              yup..any  silver  bearing  solder  is  safe  to  use.  am  not  sure  what  type  of  alpha fry  you  have  but  in  your  product  package  it  should  clearly  show  whether  it  is  lead  free  or  not...so  there  is  no  need  for  MSDS... for  your  info  alpha fry flo temp  is  lead  free,  alpha specialty solder  is  lead  free,  but  alpha fry electrical repair is not lead free. to make  sure  ask  also your  supplier  about  product details.  with regards  to  your  tin, copper, silver and bismuth  inquiry previously,  looks  like this is lead free. 

              --- On Tue, 9/7/10, krp20042003 <kcamadak@...> wrote:

              From: krp20042003 <kcamadak@...>
              Subject: [new_distillers] Re: solder question
              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 2:44 AM

               
              I have also found some solder called
              "Alpha Fry silver bearing solid wire" but I can't seem to find a MSDS to see what the solder consists of. I never thought finding the right solder would be such a problem.

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rainero Morgia <raineromorgia@...> wrote:
              >
              > just  make  sure  it is  food  grade  or  certified-free of toxic metals  or  don't  use  it.  not  sure  what  percentage  composition  is  bismuth  in  your  solder  material   but  generally  bismuth  has  a  low  vaporization  temperature,  thus  will  slowly  get  oxidized  and  also galvanic  corrosion  compatability  with  copper  or  stainless steel  is  not  good.  its  typical  application  are  for  low  melting  like  water-sprinklers,  etc..not  for  cooking..
              > you  should  be  able  to  find  hard  silver  solder....
              >
              > --- On Mon, 9/6/10, krp20042003 <kcamadak@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: krp20042003 <kcamadak@...>
              > Subject: [new_distillers] solder question
              > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Monday, September 6, 2010, 10:37 PM
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              >
              >
              > Hello everyone, I'm new to the group. Just wondering what the verdict is on bismuth?
              >
              > I am having trouble finding any lead free solder around here without antimony or selenium around here. I did find some that contains tin, copper, silver, and bismuth but I am not sure if this is o.k. to use. Thanks for any advice.
              >


            • krp20042003
              Rainero, thanks for the help. The solder that I found was Alpha Fry Flow Temp Lead Free Silver Bearing Solid Wire. I contacted the manufacturer and they said
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 8, 2010
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                Rainero, thanks for the help. The solder that I found was Alpha Fry Flow Temp Lead Free Silver Bearing Solid Wire. I contacted the manufacturer and they said that it was 96% tin 3.9% copper 0.1% silver. So I think that I am good to go. Thanks again.



                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rainero Morgia <raineromorgia@...> wrote:
                >
                > yup..any  silver  bearing  solder  is  safe  to  use.  am  not  sure  what  type  of  alpha fry  you  have  but  in  your  product  package  it  should  clearly  show  whether  it  is  lead  free  or  not...so  there  is  no  need  for  MSDS... for  your  info  alpha fry flo temp  is  lead  free,  alpha specialty solder  is  lead  free,  but  alpha fry electrical repair is not lead free. to make  sure  ask  also your  supplier  about  product details.  with regards  to  your  tin, copper, silver and bismuth  inquiry previously,  looks  like this is lead free. 
                >
                > --- On Tue, 9/7/10, krp20042003 <kcamadak@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > From: krp20042003 <kcamadak@...>
                > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: solder question
                > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 2:44 AM
                >
                >
                >  
                >
                >
                >
                > I have also found some solder called
                > "Alpha Fry silver bearing solid wire" but I can't seem to find a MSDS to see what the solder consists of. I never thought finding the right solder would be such a problem.
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Rainero Morgia <raineromorgia@> wrote:
                > >
                > > just  make  sure  it is  food  grade  or  certified-free of toxic metals  or  don't  use  it.  not  sure  what  percentage  composition  is  bismuth  in  your  solder  material   but  generally  bismuth  has  a  low  vaporization  temperature,  thus  will  slowly  get  oxidized  and  also galvanic  corrosion  compatability  with  copper  or  stainless steel  is  not  good.  its  typical  application  are  for  low  melting  like  water-sprinklers,  etc..not  for  cooking..
                > > you  should  be  able  to  find  hard  silver  solder....
                > >
                > > --- On Mon, 9/6/10, krp20042003 <kcamadak@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > From: krp20042003 <kcamadak@>
                > > Subject: [new_distillers] solder question
                > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                > > Date: Monday, September 6, 2010, 10:37 PM
                > >
                > >
                > >  
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Hello everyone, I'm new to the group. Just wondering what the verdict is on bismuth?
                > >
                > > I am having trouble finding any lead free solder around here without antimony or selenium around here. I did find some that contains tin, copper, silver, and bismuth but I am not sure if this is o.k. to use. Thanks for any advice.
                > >
                >
              • Al Wells
                What you want is a silver brazing material labeled BAg7. This is a food grade silver brazing alloy with good working characteristics.
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 8, 2010
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                  What you want is a silver brazing material labeled BAg7. This is a
                  food grade silver brazing alloy with good working characteristics.
                • daryl_bee
                  In past I ve used Silfos 15 with no apparent issues http://www.silfos.com/products/catalog/Sil-Fos-15-orderby0-p-1-c-62.html You need a torch though as it
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 9, 2010
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                    In past I've used Silfos 15 with no apparent issues
                    http://www.silfos.com/products/catalog/Sil-Fos-15-orderby0-p-1-c-62.html
                    You need a torch though as it melts at 1190F and flows at 1475F. Most welding stores have it. Silver 15%, Copper 80%, Phos 5%. It can fill moderate gaps too.

                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Al Wells <fossildiver@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > What you want is a silver brazing material labeled BAg7. This is a
                    > food grade silver brazing alloy with good working characteristics.
                    >
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