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How Much Sugar Does The Malting Of A Grain Burn?

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  • ballard_bootlegger
    Just what the title says, does anyone have an idea of the average percentage of sugar/starch the malting process of a grain burns? Will an all malt
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 4, 2010
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      Just what the title says, does anyone have an idea of the average percentage of sugar/starch the malting process of a grain burns? Will an all malt fermentation yield as much alcohol as the fermentation of a mostly un-malted grain bill of the same type?
    • Harry
      ... 3. BYNE (âõíç); Brasium; Maltum; Malt.—This is barley which has been made to germinate by moisture and warmth, and afterwards dried, by which the
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 5, 2010
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "ballard_bootlegger" <meriwetherdistilleries@...> wrote:
        >
        > Just what the title says, does anyone have an idea of the average percentage of sugar/starch the malting process of a grain burns? >


        3. BYNE (âõíç); Brasium; Maltum; Malt.—This is barley which has been made to germinate by moisture and warmth, and afterwards dried, by which the vitality of the seed is destroyed.—By this process part of the proteine matter of the barley is converted into diastase. This, although it does not constitute more than about 1/500th of the malt, serves to effect the conversion of about 40 per cent, of the starch of the seed into grape-sugar, or gum (dextrine). The grain loses by the operation of malting about 8 per cent. of its weight, and gains about 1/11th or 1/12th in bulk. This loss arises in part from the separation of the radicles in the form of malt-dust or cummins. The colour of the malt varies with the temperature at which it is dried. If the temperature does not exceed 100° F., the result is pale malt; if it be above this and does not exceed 180°, the result is amber malt. These varieties of malt yield fermentable infusions. Brown or blown malt dried at 260° F. is used to communicate flavour; while roasted, burned, or high-dried malt, which has been scorched, is employed for colouring porter.

        Source: http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/pereira/hordeum.html



        > Will an all malt fermentation yield as much alcohol as the
        > fermentation of a mostly un-malted grain bill of the same type?

        Yields vary considerably from 300 to 450 litres per ton of grain. Try reading Chapters 2 - 4 of
        "Whisky - Technology, Production and Marketing - Inge Russell".
        You can read here in my Library. It's in the Production section...
        http://distillers.tastylime.net/newSite/


        Slainte!
        regards Harry

        ps
        Arre you going ahead with that distillery in Seattle?

        H
      • Ric Cunningham
        In a nutshell - none. Malting allows the grain to convert the internal starches to sugars. This is done by the Diastase stated below. Malt is rated by its
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 5, 2010
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          In a nutshell - none. Malting allows the grain to convert the internal starches to sugars. This is done by the Diastase stated below. Malt is rated by its diastatic power - the amount of starch it can convert. Unmalted grain has no diastatic power. 6 row malted barley is generally highest and can convert lots of unmalted adjuncts (corn, rice, unmalted barley and wheat).

          On Sun, Sep 5, 2010 at 3:59 AM, Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
           



          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "ballard_bootlegger" <meriwetherdistilleries@...> wrote:
          >
          > Just what the title says, does anyone have an idea of the average percentage of sugar/starch the malting process of a grain burns? >

          3. BYNE (âõíç); Brasium; Maltum; Malt.—This is barley which has been made to germinate by moisture and warmth, and afterwards dried, by which the vitality of the seed is destroyed.—By this process part of the proteine matter of the barley is converted into diastase. This, although it does not constitute more than about 1/500th of the malt, serves to effect the conversion of about 40 per cent, of the starch of the seed into grape-sugar, or gum (dextrine). The grain loses by the operation of malting about 8 per cent. of its weight, and gains about 1/11th or 1/12th in bulk. This loss arises in part from the separation of the radicles in the form of malt-dust or cummins. The colour of the malt varies with the temperature at which it is dried. If the temperature does not exceed 100° F., the result is pale malt; if it be above this and does not exceed 180°, the result is amber malt. These varieties of malt yield fermentable infusions. Brown or blown malt dried at 260° F. is used to communicate flavour; while roasted, burned, or high-dried malt, which has been scorched, is employed for colouring porter.

          Source: http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/pereira/hordeum.html


          > Will an all malt fermentation yield as much alcohol as the
          > fermentation of a mostly un-malted grain bill of the same type?

          Yields vary considerably from 300 to 450 litres per ton of grain. Try reading Chapters 2 - 4 of
          "Whisky - Technology, Production and Marketing - Inge Russell".
          You can read here in my Library. It's in the Production section...
          http://distillers.tastylime.net/newSite/

          Slainte!
          regards Harry

          ps
          Arre you going ahead with that distillery in Seattle?

          H


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