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Re: I Need Help (again)

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  • Tom
    Z Bob, Thanks for your input. You asked if this was a first run with new equipment. No. It was the third run. The two (2) prior runs were JEM (Jim s Energy
    Message 1 of 18 , Aug 3 7:00 PM
      Z Bob,

      Thanks for your input. You asked if this was a first run with new equipment. No. It was the third run. The two (2) prior runs were JEM (Jim's Energy Miracle Gro) sugar washes. The first one turned out great. The second one started out great. It was a double batch. I stopped mid-way and resumed the following day. For some reason I got blue product on the second day. I treated it with citric acid and will re-run that portion of the output. Following that run, I completely dismantled the still, cleaned it with Five Star Star-San followed by vinegar/water at a ratio of 1 part vinegar to 3 parts water. The system was clean when I ran the wine through it.

      I'm going to dilute the neutral that I collected from the wine and re-run it.

      Thanks for your help.

      Cheers,

      Tom




      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tom,
      >
      > Comments inline.
      >
      > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
      >
      > SNIP
    • tgfoitwoods
      Wow, Tom, I m completely bum-foozled. The only thing I can say with any confidence at all is: blue product usually means high pH along with lots of nitrogen
      Message 2 of 18 , Aug 3 9:22 PM
        Wow, Tom,

        I'm completely bum-foozled. The only thing I can say with any confidence
        at all is: blue product usually means high pH along with lots of
        nitrogen compounds, so that Schweizer's reagent, an ammonium-copper
        complex, is formed. I don't think that ever happens with a normal acidic
        wash. Usually, it's from adding bicarb to a wash with yeast nutrients in
        it. In case I really need to say it, bicarb only belongs in once-(or
        more) distilled washes.

        As for the rest, I know and use Star-San, and can't see how that
        connects to bad-flavored wine distillate.

        Sorry. Anyone else out there got a clue?
        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
        >
        > Z Bob,
        >
        > Thanks for your input. You asked if this was a first run with new
        equipment. No. It was the third run. The two (2) prior runs were JEM
        (Jim's Energy Miracle Gro) sugar washes. The first one turned out
        great. The second one started out great. It was a double batch. I
        stopped mid-way and resumed the following day. For some reason I got
        blue product on the second day. I treated it with citric acid and will
        re-run that portion of the output. Following that run, I completely
        dismantled the still, cleaned it with Five Star Star-San followed by
        vinegar/water at a ratio of 1 part vinegar to 3 parts water. The system
        was clean when I ran the wine through it.
        >
        > I'm going to dilute the neutral that I collected from the wine and
        re-run it.
        >
        > Thanks for your help.
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Tom
        >
        ----snip----
      • jamesonbeam1
        Hi Tom, Sorry, been away playing with my new toy. Its an 84 cup commercial coffee maker that was thown away (looked like it was burnt out by running dry), but
        Message 3 of 18 , Aug 4 5:57 AM
          Hi Tom,

          Sorry, been away playing with my new toy. Its an 84 cup commercial
          coffee maker that was thown away (looked like it was burnt out by
          running dry), but was easy to fix with some new wiring. By overridding
          the brewing controls, It makes a really nice boiler and by just
          unscrewing the top glass part to watch the coffee brewing and putting in
          new wash while draining the backset out from the bottom spigot, its
          almost like a continuous distiller. Works great for stripping runs.

          Anyways, not having tasted your product, Im guessing that all the
          playing around you did with your wine and not using the correct
          percentages for heads and tails probably added to the strange "nose" and
          flavors.

          Redistilling should correct the problem. And yes, as ZB mentioned, blue
          distillate is definitly caused by adding too much ammonium based
          nitrogen (in the JEM case - too much plant food). Be a bit more
          consevative next time.

          JB.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Wow, Tom,
          >
          > I'm completely bum-foozled. The only thing I can say with any
          confidence
          > at all is: blue product usually means high pH along with lots of
          > nitrogen compounds, so that Schweizer's reagent, an ammonium-copper
          > complex, is formed. I don't think that ever happens with a normal
          acidic
          > wash. Usually, it's from adding bicarb to a wash with yeast nutrients
          in
          > it. In case I really need to say it, bicarb only belongs in once-(or
          > more) distilled washes.
          >
          > As for the rest, I know and use Star-San, and can't see how that
          > connects to bad-flavored wine distillate.
          >
          > Sorry. Anyone else out there got a clue?
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" tomhawk412@ wrote:
          > >
          > > Z Bob,
        • Tom
          JB, Thanks for the help. I m still confused about the nose of the output. Even if I got the cuts wrtong, the middle of the middle should be as good as it
          Message 4 of 18 , Aug 4 7:00 AM
            JB,

            Thanks for the help. I'm still confused about the "nose" of the output. Even if I got the cuts wrtong, the middle of the middle should be as good as it gets and all fractions have the same "nose" and bitter after taste.

            As soon as I have an oportunity, I'm going to redistill it.

            The "blue" distillate from the previous run is still a mystery too as the first day's out pout was very nice. I shut down and resumed the next day (it was a double batch - 10 gallons, total) and the output on the second day was blue. I changed nothing.

            In any event, I'm learning and enjoying every twist and turn!

            Cheers,

            Tom


            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi Tom,
            >
            > Sorry, been away playing with my new toy. Its an 84 cup commercial
            > coffee maker that was thown away (looked like it was burnt out by
            > running dry), but was easy to fix with some new wiring. By overridding
            > the brewing controls, It makes a really nice boiler and by just
            > unscrewing the top glass part to watch the coffee brewing and putting in
            > new wash while draining the backset out from the bottom spigot, its
            > almost like a continuous distiller. Works great for stripping runs.
            >
            > Anyways, not having tasted your product, Im guessing that all the
            > playing around you did with your wine and not using the correct
            > percentages for heads and tails probably added to the strange "nose" and
            > flavors.
            >
            > Redistilling should correct the problem. And yes, as ZB mentioned, blue
            > distillate is definitly caused by adding too much ammonium based
            > nitrogen (in the JEM case - too much plant food). Be a bit more
            > consevative next time.
            >
            > JB.
            >
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Wow, Tom,
            > >
            > > I'm completely bum-foozled. The only thing I can say with any
            > confidence
            > > at all is: blue product usually means high pH along with lots of
            > > nitrogen compounds, so that Schweizer's reagent, an ammonium-copper
            > > complex, is formed. I don't think that ever happens with a normal
            > acidic
            > > wash. Usually, it's from adding bicarb to a wash with yeast nutrients
            > in
            > > it. In case I really need to say it, bicarb only belongs in once-(or
            > > more) distilled washes.
            > >
            > > As for the rest, I know and use Star-San, and can't see how that
            > > connects to bad-flavored wine distillate.
            > >
            > > Sorry. Anyone else out there got a clue?
            > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" tomhawk412@ wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Z Bob,
            >
          • jamesonbeam1
            Tom, YWV. However, this is the second or third time I have heard of people producing blue distillate after shutting down and restarting the next day. What
            Message 5 of 18 , Aug 4 7:15 AM
              Tom,

              YWV. However, this is the second or third time I have heard of people
              producing blue distillate after shutting down and restarting the next
              day. What happens is that any vapors and liquid, rich in that ammoium
              based nitrogen with sit in the copper parts of your still and cause this
              chemical reaction over that time period. Tis always better to do a
              complete run thru or if you have to stop, take the head off and rinse
              out well before restarting.

              JB.


              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@...> wrote:
              >
              > JB,
              >
              > Thanks for the help. I'm still confused about the "nose" of the
              output. Even if I got the cuts wrtong, the middle of the middle should
              be as good as it gets and all fractions have the same "nose" and bitter
              after taste.
              >
              > As soon as I have an oportunity, I'm going to redistill it.
              >
              > The "blue" distillate from the previous run is still a mystery too as
              the first day's out pout was very nice. I shut down and resumed the next
              day (it was a double batch - 10 gallons, total) and the output on the
              second day was blue. I changed nothing.
              >
              > In any event, I'm learning and enjoying every twist and turn!
              >
              > Cheers,
              >
              > Tom
            • tgfoitwoods
              Interesting, Waldo, I ve never heard the part about interrupted runs (distillus interruptus?) and the blue ookies, but it makes sense. If I remember the
              Message 6 of 18 , Aug 4 7:55 AM
                Interesting, Waldo,

                I've never heard the part about interrupted runs (distillus
                interruptus?) and the blue ookies, but it makes sense. If I remember the
                chemistry correctly, Schweizer's reagent is only formed at all if the
                wash is basic. If Tom has to halt his runs very often, maybe dropping
                the wash pH to, say, 5, would allow him to avoid "feeling blue" even
                with an interrupted run.

                Have you ever tested the pH of your JEM wash?

                I'm still stumped by the offensive nose.

                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...>
                wrote:
                >
                >
                > Tom,
                >
                > YWV. However, this is the second or third time I have heard of people
                > producing blue distillate after shutting down and restarting the next
                > day. What happens is that any vapors and liquid, rich in that
                ammoium
                > based nitrogen with sit in the copper parts of your still and cause
                this
                > chemical reaction over that time period. Tis always better to do a
                > complete run thru or if you have to stop, take the head off and rinse
                > out well before restarting.
                >
                > JB.
                >
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" tomhawk412@ wrote:
                > >
                > > JB,
                > >
                > > Thanks for the help. I'm still confused about the "nose" of the
                > output. Even if I got the cuts wrtong, the middle of the middle should
                > be as good as it gets and all fractions have the same "nose" and
                bitter
                > after taste.
                > >
                > > As soon as I have an oportunity, I'm going to redistill it.
                > >
                > > The "blue" distillate from the previous run is still a mystery too
                as
                > the first day's out pout was very nice. I shut down and resumed the
                next
                > day (it was a double batch - 10 gallons, total) and the output on the
                > second day was blue. I changed nothing.
                > >
                > > In any event, I'm learning and enjoying every twist and turn!
                > >
                > > Cheers,
                > >
                > > Tom
                >
              • Tom
                JB, Now, that makes sense! I chose to shut down in situ based on a comment in Nixon & McCaw s The Compleat Distiller that a run can be interrupted and
                Message 7 of 18 , Aug 4 7:58 AM
                  JB,

                  Now, that makes sense! I chose to shut down in situ based on a comment in Nixon & McCaw's "The Compleat Distiller" that a run can be interrupted and resumed later with no ill effects and no need to collect foreshots or heads following the resumption as they had been collected earlier. Based on your information, and my recent experience, I will always complete a run.

                  Cheers,

                  Tom

                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Tom,
                  >
                  > YWV. However, this is the second or third time I have heard of people
                  > producing blue distillate after shutting down and restarting the next
                  > day. What happens is that any vapors and liquid, rich in that ammoium
                  > based nitrogen with sit in the copper parts of your still and cause this
                  > chemical reaction over that time period. Tis always better to do a
                  > complete run thru or if you have to stop, take the head off and rinse
                  > out well before restarting.
                  >
                  > JB.
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tomhawk412@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > JB,
                  > >
                  > > Thanks for the help. I'm still confused about the "nose" of the
                  > output. Even if I got the cuts wrtong, the middle of the middle should
                  > be as good as it gets and all fractions have the same "nose" and bitter
                  > after taste.
                  > >
                  > > As soon as I have an oportunity, I'm going to redistill it.
                  > >
                  > > The "blue" distillate from the previous run is still a mystery too as
                  > the first day's out pout was very nice. I shut down and resumed the next
                  > day (it was a double batch - 10 gallons, total) and the output on the
                  > second day was blue. I changed nothing.
                  > >
                  > > In any event, I'm learning and enjoying every twist and turn!
                  > >
                  > > Cheers,
                  > >
                  > > Tom
                  >
                • jamesonbeam1
                  Welp ZB, Again, Im just guessing that something in the wine might have caused those odors if Tom s still was clean. As far as the pH of a JEM wash, if he had
                  Message 8 of 18 , Aug 4 8:28 AM
                    Welp ZB,

                    Again, Im just guessing that something in the wine might have caused
                    those odors if Tom's still was clean.

                    As far as the pH of a JEM wash, if he had followed the directions and
                    added lemon juice whilst inverting the sugars, it would have come out
                    around a 5.4 to 5.8 pH which would have dropped even more during
                    fermentation. Remember in Mason's MUM wash, he uses tomato paste to
                    accomplish that.

                    But it does seem strange that several members over the past several
                    years seem to be getting blue distillate when re-starting a distillation
                    the next day. The only execption I remember was when a newbie tried to
                    use about 1.4 grams of DAP per liter of fermentation which of course
                    caused Schweizer's reagent. *note - that would be almost an ounce of
                    DAP in a 5 gallon wash lol. Also if Tom used the correct amount of
                    plant food, it should not have caused that reaction in a single run, but
                    if left overnight - there might have been enough time for the reaction
                    to take place from the vapors and liquids left in the head.

                    JB.




                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Interesting, Waldo,
                    >
                    > I've never heard the part about interrupted runs (distillus
                    > interruptus?) and the blue ookies, but it makes sense. If I remember
                    the
                    > chemistry correctly, Schweizer's reagent is only formed at all if the
                    > wash is basic. If Tom has to halt his runs very often, maybe dropping
                    > the wash pH to, say, 5, would allow him to avoid "feeling blue" even
                    > with an interrupted run.
                    >
                    > Have you ever tested the pH of your JEM wash?
                    >
                    > I'm still stumped by the offensive nose.
                    >
                    > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Tom,
                    > >
                    > > YWV. However, this is the second or third time I have heard of
                    people
                    > > producing blue distillate after shutting down and restarting the
                    next
                    > > day. What happens is that any vapors and liquid, rich in that
                    > ammoium
                    > > based nitrogen with sit in the copper parts of your still and cause
                    > this
                    > > chemical reaction over that time period. Tis always better to do a
                    > > complete run thru or if you have to stop, take the head off and
                    rinse
                    > > out well before restarting.
                    > >
                    > > JB.
                  • jamesonbeam1
                    Perhaps a New Golden Rule ZB.... Tis not a good thing to interrtuptus a distillus or coitus??? [;)] JB. aka Waldo aka The Ornery One. ... wrote:
                    Message 9 of 18 , Aug 4 8:42 AM

                      Perhaps a New Golden Rule ZB....

                      Tis not a good thing to interrtuptus a distillus or coitus???  ;)

                      JB.  aka Waldo aka The Ornery One.


                       --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" zymurgybob@
                       wrote:

                       Interesting, Waldo,

                      I've never heard the part about interrupted runs (distillus
                       interruptus?)

                      ___snip

                    • Robert Hubble
                      Waldo, A great rule!!! Either one will make you even ornerier! Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com From: jamesonbeam1@yahoo.com
                      Message 10 of 18 , Aug 4 1:31 PM
                        Waldo,

                        A great rule!!! Either one will make you even ornerier!

                        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




                        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        From: jamesonbeam1@...
                        Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 15:42:46 +0000
                        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: I Need Help (again)

                         

                        Perhaps a New Golden Rule ZB....
                        Tis not a good thing to interrtuptus a distillus or coitus???  ;)
                        JB.  aka Waldo aka The Ornery One.


                        ___snip

                      • Tom
                        JB, I did follow the instructions and add lemmon juice during the sugar conversion. I just checked my log book (indespensible) and can report the following:
                        Message 11 of 18 , Aug 4 6:41 PM
                          JB,

                          I did follow the instructions and add lemmon juice during the sugar conversion. I just checked my log book (indespensible) and can report the following: The initial pH of wash #1 was 5.12 and #2 was 5.30. I corrected the pH during fermentation on a daily basis to maintain 4.0 to 4.5 by adding potassium bicarbonate. When batch #1 (5 gallons) was finished its pH was 4.45 with a SPG of 0.992; the pH of batch #2 (5 gallons) was 4.77 and the SPG was 0.993. The first day's product (both batches were combined for one run) was sweeeeeet! The second day's product (after I had to shut down overnight) was blue!

                          From now on, I'll never interrupt a run.

                          Cheers,

                          Tom

                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          > Welp ZB,
                          >
                          > Again, Im just guessing that something in the wine might have caused
                          > those odors if Tom's still was clean.
                          >
                          > As far as the pH of a JEM wash, if he had followed the directions and
                          > added lemon juice whilst inverting the sugars, it would have come out
                          > around a 5.4 to 5.8 pH which would have dropped even more during
                          > fermentation. Remember in Mason's MUM wash, he uses tomato paste to
                          > accomplish that.
                          >
                          > But it does seem strange that several members over the past several
                          > years seem to be getting blue distillate when re-starting a distillation
                          > the next day. The only execption I remember was when a newbie tried to
                          > use about 1.4 grams of DAP per liter of fermentation which of course
                          > caused Schweizer's reagent. *note - that would be almost an ounce of
                          > DAP in a 5 gallon wash lol. Also if Tom used the correct amount of
                          > plant food, it should not have caused that reaction in a single run, but
                          > if left overnight - there might have been enough time for the reaction
                          > to take place from the vapors and liquids left in the head.
                          >
                          > JB.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Interesting, Waldo,
                          > >
                          > > I've never heard the part about interrupted runs (distillus
                          > > interruptus?) and the blue ookies, but it makes sense. If I remember
                          > the
                          > > chemistry correctly, Schweizer's reagent is only formed at all if the
                          > > wash is basic. If Tom has to halt his runs very often, maybe dropping
                          > > the wash pH to, say, 5, would allow him to avoid "feeling blue" even
                          > > with an interrupted run.
                          > >
                          > > Have you ever tested the pH of your JEM wash?
                          > >
                          > > I'm still stumped by the offensive nose.
                          > >
                          > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@
                          > > wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > Tom,
                          > > >
                          > > > YWV. However, this is the second or third time I have heard of
                          > people
                          > > > producing blue distillate after shutting down and restarting the
                          > next
                          > > > day. What happens is that any vapors and liquid, rich in that
                          > > ammoium
                          > > > based nitrogen with sit in the copper parts of your still and cause
                          > > this
                          > > > chemical reaction over that time period. Tis always better to do a
                          > > > complete run thru or if you have to stop, take the head off and
                          > rinse
                          > > > out well before restarting.
                          > > >
                          > > > JB.
                          >
                        • Rainero Morgia
                          blue distillates  can  only  result  from  the  reaction   of  copper  and  ammonia  gas...yeasts, nutrients, DAPs,sulfites,  normally 
                          Message 12 of 18 , Aug 4 8:49 PM
                            blue distillates  can  only  result  from  the  reaction   of  copper  and  ammonia  gas...yeasts, nutrients, DAPs,sulfites,  normally  contain  ammonium  salts  and  are  quite  stable  when  pH is  below 4.5...but  as  it  approaches  neutral  it readily becomes gas....others  claim  that  you will actually start  getting  ammonia  gas  at  pH  of  4.75 and  above...  this  gas  will react  and  corrode  the  copper  resulting  to  a  blue color.... as  a  rule  of  thumb   add  your  potassium  bicarbonate   on  a  stripped  wash  and  never  on   primary  fermentation  as  potassium  bicarbonate  will raise  your  pH  and  might  corrode  the  copper....
                            pH  adjustment  or  buffering  is  hard  to  master  and  its  not  merely  pH  paper or pH meter  or  adding  alkali or acid....especiallly  for  new  distillers  like  us.
                             
                            rainer

                            --- On Thu, 8/5/10, Tom <tomhawk412@...> wrote:

                            From: Tom <tomhawk412@...>
                            Subject: [new_distillers] Re: I Need Help (again)
                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Thursday, August 5, 2010, 1:41 AM

                             
                            JB,

                            I did follow the instructions and add lemmon juice during the sugar conversion. I just checked my log book (indespensible) and can report the following: The initial pH of wash #1 was 5.12 and #2 was 5.30. I corrected the pH during fermentation on a daily basis to maintain 4.0 to 4.5 by adding potassium bicarbonate. When batch #1 (5 gallons) was finished its pH was 4.45 with a SPG of 0.992; the pH of batch #2 (5 gallons) was 4.77 and the SPG was 0.993. The first day's product (both batches were combined for one run) was sweeeeeet! The second day's product (after I had to shut down overnight) was blue!

                            From now on, I'll never interrupt a run.

                            Cheers,

                            Tom

                            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > Welp ZB,
                            >
                            > Again, Im just guessing that something in the wine might have caused
                            > those odors if Tom's still was clean.
                            >
                            > As far as the pH of a JEM wash, if he had followed the directions and
                            > added lemon juice whilst inverting the sugars, it would have come out
                            > around a 5.4 to 5.8 pH which would have dropped even more during
                            > fermentation. Remember in Mason's MUM wash, he uses tomato paste to
                            > accomplish that.
                            >
                            > But it does seem strange that several members over the past several
                            > years seem to be getting blue distillate when re-starting a distillation
                            > the next day. The only execption I remember was when a newbie tried to
                            > use about 1.4 grams of DAP per liter of fermentation which of course
                            > caused Schweizer's reagent. *note - that would be almost an ounce of
                            > DAP in a 5 gallon wash lol. Also if Tom used the correct amount of
                            > plant food, it should not have caused that reaction in a single run, but
                            > if left overnight - there might have been enough time for the reaction
                            > to take place from the vapors and liquids left in the head.
                            >
                            > JB.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@>
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Interesting, Waldo,
                            > >
                            > > I've never heard the part about interrupted runs (distillus
                            > > interruptus?) and the blue ookies, but it makes sense. If I remember
                            > the
                            > > chemistry correctly, Schweizer's reagent is only formed at all if the
                            > > wash is basic. If Tom has to halt his runs very often, maybe dropping
                            > > the wash pH to, say, 5, would allow him to avoid "feeling blue" even
                            > > with an interrupted run.
                            > >
                            > > Have you ever tested the pH of your JEM wash?
                            > >
                            > > I'm still stumped by the offensive nose.
                            > >
                            > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@
                            > > wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > Tom,
                            > > >
                            > > > YWV. However, this is the second or third time I have heard of
                            > people
                            > > > producing blue distillate after shutting down and restarting the
                            > next
                            > > > day. What happens is that any vapors and liquid, rich in that
                            > > ammoium
                            > > > based nitrogen with sit in the copper parts of your still and cause
                            > > this
                            > > > chemical reaction over that time period. Tis always better to do a
                            > > > complete run thru or if you have to stop, take the head off and
                            > rinse
                            > > > out well before restarting.
                            > > >
                            > > > JB.
                            >


                          • Tom
                            Rainer, Thanks for the information. I was adding Potassium bicarbonate to the wort as it progressed through fermentation because the pH was dropping like a
                            Message 13 of 18 , Aug 5 5:25 AM
                              Rainer,

                              Thanks for the information. I was adding Potassium bicarbonate to the wort as it progressed through fermentation because the pH was dropping like a stone. I was afraid that the yeast would die due to the increased acidity.

                              Tom

                              SNIP
                            • mav
                              Tom, There is your problem, don t add Bicarb to your wash. If you do, well, you now know what happens. In other words, set the ideal starting Ph and don t
                              Message 14 of 18 , Aug 7 7:27 AM
                                Tom,

                                There is your problem, don't add Bicarb to your wash. If you do, well, you now know what happens.

                                In other words, set the ideal starting Ph and don't fool with it.

                                __________________________________________________
                                I was adding Potassium bicarbonate to the wort as
                                it progressed through fermentation
                                _________________________________________________:->


                                Cheers
                                Marc

                                Ps. Im sure Harry spoken about the over use of buffers?
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