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Re: Dumb Question

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  • jamesonbeam1
    Royce, Thats a piece of cake compared to aging liquors. Depending on what type of wine your making, in your secondary fermenter (usually a 5 gallon glass
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 8, 2010
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      Royce,

      Thats a piece of cake compared to aging liquors.  Depending on what type of wine your making, in your secondary fermenter (usually a 5 gallon glass carboy),  just add a teaspoon or so of tannin powders (available from your wine maker supply) and some oak chips (toasted if you want more flavors).

      Let it sit for a year or so before bottling and make sure you rack it off the lees every few months or so if they build up.

      JB.

      User avatar

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > There is more oaked wine than oak barrels available. Anyway winweries only keep them for 3 years - expensive way to add oak flavor!
      > wal
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Royce Thigpen fireside58@ wrote:
      > >
      > > Thanks.  My wife has informed me that she wants to age wine later.  I guess I
      > > now have to learn how to do that!

    • thursty2
      We visited a maker of home market Port barrels in the Barossa region of South Australia last year. The maker said they generally prefer to make them from
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 11, 2010
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        We visited a maker of home market Port barrels in the Barossa region of South Australia last year. The maker said they generally prefer to make them from pre-used wine barrels. He said that the flavours absorbed by the oak are imparted to the port.

        On a recent trip down through the Margaret River region in Western Australia, I was given a "dry" wine barrel. I dismantled it so that I could transport it back to Perth in our caravan. I crosscut one of the staves into 1" strips on my bandsaw then chopped them into pieces small enough to fit through the neck of a 1.75l Jack Daniels bottle which I then filled the bottle with uncut (93%) spirit. Within days the colour had changed dramatically to a golden caramel, and the oak could be detected in tasting.

        I intend to experiment with cutting/blending and hopefully will come up with a palatable oaked product.

        --------------------------------

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Royce Thigpen <fireside58@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can a wooden keg be used more that once for ageing with the same effect?
        >
      • mav
        I m feeling going off topic here. thursty2, that barrel you got from the Barossa, can I ask how much you paid for it and was it a French oak barrel? Where I m
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 11, 2010
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          I'm feeling going off topic here.

          thursty2, that barrel you got from the Barossa, can I ask how much you paid for it and was it a French oak barrel?

          Where I'm at, the local Piss shop is selling used Red port or sweet French Oak red wine barrels, big barrels, which come from the Barossa Valley).

          These are big barrels, about 200 Liters I think, they about the same size as a 44 gallon Drum.

          I think what I'm asking is, do you think $130 AUD per French barrel worth while?

          Cheers
          Marc

          >
          >
          >
          > We visited a maker of home market Port barrels in the Barossa region of South Australia last year. The maker said they generally prefer to make them from pre-used wine barrels. He said that the flavours absorbed by the oak are imparted to the port.
          >
          > On a recent trip down through the Margaret River region in Western Australia, I was given a "dry" wine barrel. I dismantled it so that I could transport it back to Perth in our caravan. I crosscut one of the staves into 1" strips on my bandsaw then chopped them into pieces small enough to fit through the neck of a 1.75l Jack Daniels bottle which I then filled the bottle with uncut (93%) spirit. Within days the colour had changed dramatically to a golden caramel, and the oak could be detected in tasting.
          >
          > I intend to experiment with cutting/blending and hopefully will come up with a palatable oaked product.
          >
          > --------------------------------
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Royce Thigpen <fireside58@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Can a wooden keg be used more that once for ageing with the same effect?
          > >
          >
        • thursty2
          Mav, I got the barrel for free - from a Margaret River winery in WA. As a barrel it was no longer serviceable, it had dried out and the would no longer hold
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 11, 2010
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            Mav,

            I got the barrel for free - from a Margaret River winery in WA. As a barrel it was no longer serviceable, it had dried out and the would no longer hold liquids. But when I cut into a stave, I could see that the oak had barely been penetrated by the red wine it held, and it smelled good. Apparently some vineyards use the barrels first for white wines, then the reds.

            $130 for a used oak barrel is about the go. A half one would cost around $80 from a plant nursery. If all you want is some oak to experiment with, ask the plonk shop where they get them. Tell them you just want some staves to do some woodwork. They may put you in touch with their supplier.

            Sorry I don't know if mine is French or American. I do know that French is 3 times more expensive (as a new barrel) than American oak.


            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mav" <mavnkaf@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm feeling going off topic here.
            >
            > thursty2, that barrel you got from the Barossa, can I ask how much you paid for it and was it a French oak barrel?
            >
            > Where I'm at, the local Piss shop is selling used Red port or sweet French Oak red wine barrels, big barrels, which come from the Barossa Valley).
            >
            > These are big barrels, about 200 Liters I think, they about the same size as a 44 gallon Drum.
            >
            > I think what I'm asking is, do you think $130 AUD per French barrel worth while?
            >
            > Cheers
            > Marc
            >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > We visited a maker of home market Port barrels in the Barossa region of South Australia last year. The maker said they generally prefer to make them from pre-used wine barrels. He said that the flavours absorbed by the oak are imparted to the port.
            > >
            > > On a recent trip down through the Margaret River region in Western Australia, I was given a "dry" wine barrel. I dismantled it so that I could transport it back to Perth in our caravan. I crosscut one of the staves into 1" strips on my bandsaw then chopped them into pieces small enough to fit through the neck of a 1.75l Jack Daniels bottle which I then filled the bottle with uncut (93%) spirit. Within days the colour had changed dramatically to a golden caramel, and the oak could be detected in tasting.
            > >
            > > I intend to experiment with cutting/blending and hopefully will come up with a palatable oaked product.
            > >
            > > --------------------------------
            > >
            > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Royce Thigpen <fireside58@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Can a wooden keg be used more that once for ageing with the same effect?
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • mav
            Thanks thursty2, I went back to the local wine shop earlier today and asked the guy about the barrels but he knew nothing but he noticed some barrels had AP
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 11, 2010
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              Thanks thursty2,

              I went back to the local wine shop earlier today and asked the guy about the barrels but he knew nothing but he noticed some barrels had AP Johns stamped on them,(the barrels are not in public view).

              A quick google and I found their web site,(www.apjohn.com.au), and they sell sample kits, so I think I'll do that when I need more oak.

              It was very tempting to get the big barrel while they've got them.

              Cheers
              Marc


              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "thursty2" <thursty2@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Mav,
              >
              > I got the barrel for free - from a Margaret River winery in WA. As a barrel it was no longer serviceable, it had dried out and the would no longer hold liquids. But when I cut into a stave, I could see that the oak had barely been penetrated by the red wine it held, and it smelled good. Apparently some vineyards use the barrels first for white wines, then the reds.
              >
              > $130 for a used oak barrel is about the go. A half one would cost around $80 from a plant nursery. If all you want is some oak to experiment with, ask the plonk shop where they get them. Tell them you just want some staves to do some woodwork. They may put you in touch with their supplier.
              >
              > Sorry I don't know if mine is French or American. I do know that French is 3 times more expensive (as a new barrel) than American oak.
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