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Re: oak ageing

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  • sojourn_61
    Hi, Here is a web page I found discussing oak aging for wine but it makes perfect sense for your situation as well: Here is the link:
    Message 1 of 8 , May 31, 2010
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      Hi,
      Here is a web page I found discussing oak aging for wine but it makes perfect sense for your situation as well:

      Here is the link: http://www.aromadictionary.com/articles/oakbarrel_article.html

      Here is a highlight:
      Winemakers are continuously frustrated by it. More words are spoken about it than any other aspect of their trade. They whinge about it endlessly, but in some ways without it their jobs would be as interesting as being a dentist. I'm talking about oak, and specifically oak barrels.

      Why the complaints? Every now and then the winemaker senses that they have nailed a near perfect match between their fruit and the oak that they have selected. Taste the wine and like the dual Rings of Shazzam, sparks fly. It just tastes right.

      Herein lies the problem. The following year, the winemaker will enthusiastically order barrels made from oak sourced from the same forest, and made by the same cooper using identical specifications to the year before. Same result you would think. However to the chagrin of the expectant winemaker the same level of success is rarely achieved.

      So what is the reason for this frustrating lack of consistency? The answer is simple. Like every clod of vineyard soil, or every parcel of grapes, each and every oak barrel is unique. No two have ever been the same, and no two ever will be. For just like wine itself, oak is a natural product. The characters that the barrel imparts to a wine are both a reflection of the natural environment in which the tree had grown, and the skill and judgment of the cooper charged with manufacturing the barrel.

      You can read the rest at the link given above. Hope this helps.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gems4200" <gems4200@...> wrote:
      >
      > Howdy Group,
      > I got a queation about ageing in oak kegs. I bought a set of 3 - 2 liter white oak kegs, med. char. I filled all 3 with the exact same mix of liquor and got very different results from each keg. After 30 days of sitting I drew it off and bottled it. The 1st keg came out with a nice dark color and had a strong oak flavor and was slightly sweet. The 2nd. keg came out a little lighter in color and was much sweeter, and less oak flavor. The last keg came out with a nice dark color, and strong oak taste and a peppery flavor.
      > Now I know I will get the response that each keg is different and will produce a different flavor form the others. But, my question is , How do you get a consitent flavor while ageing, If every keg is different? And, can you do anything to make each keg produce a more consistance results, more like each other instead of the wide range of results I am now seeing.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Rocky Mountain Shiner
      >
    • miciofelice2003
      Hi Rocky. I gave to my five casks an initial treatment by washing the casks with boiling water and salt. This to eliminate the superficial tannins. then I put
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 2, 2010
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        Hi Rocky.

        I gave to my five casks an initial treatment by washing the casks with boiling water and salt. This to eliminate the superficial tannins. then I put into some wine (white wine) for a couple of months just to "prepare" the casks to receive my grappa.

        Ciao

        micio felice



        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gems4200" <gems4200@...> wrote:
        >
        > Howdy Group,
        > I got a queation about ageing in oak kegs. I bought a set of 3 - 2 liter white oak kegs, med. char. I filled all 3 with the exact same mix of liquor and got very different results from each keg. After 30 days of sitting I drew it off and bottled it. The 1st keg came out with a nice dark color and had a strong oak flavor and was slightly sweet. The 2nd. keg came out a little lighter in color and was much sweeter, and less oak flavor. The last keg came out with a nice dark color, and strong oak taste and a peppery flavor.
        > Now I know I will get the response that each keg is different and will produce a different flavor form the others. But, my question is , How do you get a consitent flavor while ageing, If every keg is different? And, can you do anything to make each keg produce a more consistance results, more like each other instead of the wide range of results I am now seeing.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Rocky Mountain Shiner
        >
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