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Re: Molasses source

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  • jamesonbeam1
    Dang People, Please listen to Mason and be extreamly careful of using any type of feed grade molasses products here in the US.... As I have mentioned many,
    Message 1 of 15 , Apr 14 6:51 AM
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      Dang People,

      Please listen to Mason and be extreamly careful of using any type of "feed grade" molasses products here in the US....  As I have mentioned many, many times before, blackstrap or feed grade molasses in the US most always contains presevatives that prevent making a good product and usually result in a stuck fermentation.  Unless you know what you are doing and can buy directly from the sugar mill or a reliable source, as some of our friends in the Caribbean do, stay away from it.

      9 times out of 10, processed cattle feed including molasses and sweet feed (which Mason, I and others have had bad experiences with), contains a very bad presevative called "propionic acid".  Again I will quote the properties and uses of it:

      Propionic acid inhibits the growth of mold and some bacteria (AND YEASTS) at the levels between 0.1 and 1% by weight. As a result, most propionic acid produced is consumed as a preservative for both animal feed and food for human consumption. For animal feed, it is used either directly or as its ammonium salt. The antibiotic Monensin is added to cattle feed to favor propionibacteria over acetic acid producers in the rumen; this produces less carbon dioxide and feed conversion is better. This application accounts for about half of the world production of propionic acid.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propionic_acid

      Please review our archieves on "sweet feed" , "feed grade molasses" or "propionic acid" if you have any questions.  Above all ask the correct questions about presevatives if you are going to try it.

      Vino es Veritas,

      Jim aka Waldo..

      ________________________________________________________________________


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rosnekcaj" <jensor4@...> wrote:
      >
      > As a kid growing up on a small dairy farm (in the 40's) I remember we ground and mixed the feed for our cattle and one of the ingredients we used was black strap molasses that was stored in a 50 gallon steel drum. We kids used to catch the drippings ond lick our fingers. It probably is still available from farm or ag supply stores. I tend to think it would probably be okay as a source for sugar, however as with anything prepared "Caveat Emptor"!
      >
      > rosnekacj
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "whackfol" whackfol@ wrote:
      > >
      > > The following link is to a molasses I and considering for a rum.
      > >
      > > http://www.southernstates.com/catalog/p-248-1gl-molasses-attractant.aspx
      > >
      > > It says that it is "feed grade" and "82 BRIX". If you have any knowledge of the product or any opinion as to its suitability, I'd like to hear them.
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Whack
      > >
      >

    • Todd
      The feed grade molasses also has a lot of other gunk in it generally, like ash. I have tried both. With feed grade, you get a lot of big globs of that gunk
      Message 2 of 15 , Apr 14 7:30 AM
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        The feed grade molasses also has a lot of other "gunk" in it generally, like ash. I have tried both. With feed grade, you get a lot of big globs of that gunk pouring out. What I would suggest is you check with your friend that works at a restaraunt or bakery. They should be able to order a case (4 gallons) of fancy molasses for $30-35. Ferments better, tastes better, made for human consumption, etc

        Good luck,
        T-



        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "whackfol" <whackfol@...> wrote:
        >
        > The following link is to a molasses I and considering for a rum.
        >
        > http://www.southernstates.com/catalog/p-248-1gl-molasses-attractant.aspx
        >
        > It says that it is "feed grade" and "82 BRIX". If you have any knowledge of the product or any opinion as to its suitability, I'd like to hear them.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Whack
        >
      • rosnekcaj
        Thanks Waldo, For some who see this as beating a dead horse, however for me your post was an eye opener. I need to educate myself more before opening my mouth
        Message 3 of 15 , Apr 15 4:30 AM
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          Thanks Waldo,

          For some who see this as beating a dead horse, however for me your post was an eye opener. I need to educate myself more before opening my mouth the next time.

          rosnekcaj

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Dang People,
          >
          > Please listen to Mason and be extreamly careful of using any type of
          > "feed grade" molasses products here in the US.... As I have mentioned
          > many, many times before, blackstrap or feed grade molasses in the US
          > most always contains presevatives that prevent making a good product and
          > usually result in a stuck fermentation. Unless you know what you are
          > doing and can buy directly from the sugar mill or a reliable source, as
          > some of our friends in the Caribbean do, stay away from it.
          >
          > 9 times out of 10, processed cattle feed including molasses and sweet
          > feed (which Mason, I and others have had bad experiences with), contains
          > a very bad presevative called "propionic acid". Again I will quote the
          > properties and uses of it:
          >
          > Propionic acid inhibits the growth of mold
          > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mold> and some bacteria
          > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterium> (AND YEASTS) at the levels
          > between 0.1 and 1% by weight. As a result, most propionic acid produced
          > is consumed as a preservative
          > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preservative> for both animal feed and
          > food for human consumption. For animal feed, it is used either directly
          > or as its ammonium <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium> salt. The
          > antibiotic Monensin <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monensin> is added to
          > cattle feed to favor propionibacteria over acetic acid producers in the
          > rumen; this produces less carbon dioxide and feed conversion is better.
          > This application accounts for about half of the world production of
          > propionic acid. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propionic_acid
          > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propionic_acid>
          >
          > Please review our archieves on "sweet feed" , "feed grade molasses" or
          > "propionic acid" if you have any questions. Above all ask the correct
          > questions about presevatives if you are going to try it.
          >
          > Vino es Veritas,
          >
          > Jim aka Waldo..
          >
          >
        • jamesonbeam1
          YVW Ros, This was not directed at you. Its just that sometimes I get tired of repeating myself when the information is usually in the archieves. JB. ... post
          Message 4 of 15 , Apr 15 5:04 AM
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            YVW Ros,

            This was not directed at you. Its just that sometimes I get tired of
            repeating myself when the information is usually in the archieves.

            JB.


            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rosnekcaj" <jensor4@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks Waldo,
            >
            > For some who see this as beating a dead horse, however for me your
            post was an eye opener. I need to educate myself more before opening my
            mouth the next time.
            >
            > rosnekcaj
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@
            wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > Dang People,
            > >
            > > Please listen to Mason and be extreamly careful of using any type of
            > > "feed grade" molasses products here in the US.... As I have
            mentioned
            > > many, many times before, blackstrap or feed grade molasses in the US
            > > most always contains presevatives that prevent making a good product
            and
            > > usually result in a stuck fermentation. Unless you know what you are
            > > doing and can buy directly from the sugar mill or a reliable source,
            as
            > > some of our friends in the Caribbean do, stay away from it.
            > >
            > > 9 times out of 10, processed cattle feed including molasses and
            sweet
            > > feed (which Mason, I and others have had bad experiences with),
            contains
            > > a very bad presevative called "propionic acid". Again I will quote
            the
            > > properties and uses of it:
            > >
            > > Propionic acid inhibits the growth of mold
            > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mold> and some bacteria
            > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterium> (AND YEASTS) at the levels
            > > between 0.1 and 1% by weight. As a result, most propionic acid
            produced
            > > is consumed as a preservative
            > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preservative> for both animal feed and
            > > food for human consumption. For animal feed, it is used either
            directly
            > > or as its ammonium <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonium> salt. The
            > > antibiotic Monensin <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monensin> is added
            to
            > > cattle feed to favor propionibacteria over acetic acid producers in
            the
            > > rumen; this produces less carbon dioxide and feed conversion is
            better.
            > > This application accounts for about half of the world production of
            > > propionic acid. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propionic_acid
            > > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propionic_acid>
            > >
            > > Please review our archieves on "sweet feed" , "feed grade molasses"
            or
            > > "propionic acid" if you have any questions. Above all ask the
            correct
            > > questions about presevatives if you are going to try it.
            > >
            > > Vino es Veritas,
            > >
            > > Jim aka Waldo..
            > >
            > >
            >
          • geoff
            Hi Jim, Was that the farm animal molasses stuff that had the urea crap in that Harry was trying to enlighten Mason or Trid about, and were having a lot of fun
            Message 5 of 15 , Apr 15 12:39 PM
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              Hi Jim,
               Was that the farm animal molasses stuff that had the urea crap in that Harry was trying to enlighten Mason or Trid about, and were having a lot of fun with floating crap.  From what I can remember it smelt like a pig/hen house full of pig/hen shit in 35 C summer heat after a couple of days before or after it was distilled or fermented
              Not nice stuff from the postings you lads were posting.
              Geoff
            • jamesonbeam1
              LOL Geoff, I think that was the sweet horse feed Mason tried and said it pretty much smelled like that after the other Uncle Jesse had recommended it. Anyway
              Message 6 of 15 , Apr 16 5:48 AM
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                LOL Geoff,

                I think that was the sweet horse feed Mason tried and said it pretty
                much smelled like that after the other Uncle Jesse had recommended it.
                Anyway it was pretty bad....

                JB.


                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Hi Jim,
                > Was that the farm animal molasses stuff that had the urea crap in that
                Harry was trying to enlighten Mason or Trid about, and were having a lot
                of fun with floating crap. From what I can remember it smelt like a
                pig/hen house full of pig/hen shit in 35 C summer heat after a couple of
                days before or after it was distilled or fermented
                > Not nice stuff from the postings you lads were posting.
                > Geoff
                >
              • mav
                Despite what has been said by the moderators about Molasses. Where I live the molasses is very good to the last drop. And cheap, while I get nice molasses
                Message 7 of 15 , Apr 17 3:49 AM
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                  Despite what has been said by the moderators about Molasses.

                  Where I live the molasses is very good to the last drop. And cheap, while I get nice molasses for about $1.20 AU per kg, Bye the 20L bucket load, which is free too..

                  In Ozzie land, if you pay more then that, you know that it's laced with other stuff. Those other molasses products get sold under a brand name! I have mentioned all this before!

                  Cheers
                  Marc

                  Ps Please use the search tool on Harry's web sites.


                  Pss, Use Harry's clarifying tip to clear the Malasses

                  --------------------------------------------------------------------

                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "whackfol" <whackfol@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The following link is to a molasses I and considering for a rum.
                  >
                  > http://www.southernstates.com/catalog/p-248-1gl-molasses-attractant.aspx
                  >
                  > It says that it is "feed grade" and "82 BRIX". If you have any knowledge of the product or any opinion as to its suitability, I'd like to hear them.
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  > Whack
                  >
                • jamesonbeam1
                  Yes Marc, And Im dang envious of you all.... If I remember correctly, down in Oz, Harry once said its so cheap they use it to spray the roads down there
                  Message 8 of 15 , Apr 17 4:54 AM
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                    Yes Marc,

                    And Im dang envious of you all.... If I remember correctly, down in Oz,
                    Harry once said its so cheap they use it to spray the roads down there
                    instead of paveing them, to keep the dust down. While it may be good
                    for dust, I would hate to see the fruit fly population..

                    However, here in the US, pure molasses is pretty steep compared to you
                    all. The biggest problems here with finding cheap molasses, is that it
                    usually feed grade, and as I mentioned 9 times out of 10 its treated
                    with other crap and presevatives.

                    Vino es Veritas,

                    Jim aka Waldo.

                    ________________________________________________________________________
                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mav" <mavnkaf@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Despite what has been said by the moderators about Molasses.
                    >
                    > Where I live the molasses is very good to the last drop. And cheap,
                    while I get nice molasses for about $1.20 AU per kg, Bye the 20L bucket
                    load, which is free too..
                    >
                    > In Ozzie land, if you pay more then that, you know that it's laced
                    with other stuff. Those other molasses products get sold under a brand
                    name! I have mentioned all this before!
                    >
                    > Cheers,

                    Marc
                  • mav
                    Yes Jim, some are lucky with nice molasses, but then you guy s can have cheap products too! To be able to make good mashes old school style using enzymes ,
                    Message 9 of 15 , Apr 19 7:41 AM
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                      Yes Jim, some are lucky with nice molasses, but then you guy's can have cheap products too! To be able to make good mashes old school style using enzymes , which would be very nice too!

                      At the end of the day, We use the local Products that's close at hand and we should count our lucky stars that we have them!!

                      By the way, I 'm in the bottom (ass), end of Harry's paradise Island, about 3000 km to the south in a straight line.

                      And the Molasses still finds it way down here at a reasonable rate. Maybe not at road spray rates??? But cheap enough against brown sugar!

                      Anyway, Jim and Mason keep up the good work!

                      Cheers
                      Marc


                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Yes Marc,
                      >
                      > And Im dang envious of you all.... If I remember correctly, down in Oz,
                      > Harry once said its so cheap they use it to spray the roads down there
                      > instead of paveing them, to keep the dust down. While it may be good
                      > for dust, I would hate to see the fruit fly population..
                      >
                      > However, here in the US, pure molasses is pretty steep compared to you
                      > all. The biggest problems here with finding cheap molasses, is that it
                      > usually feed grade, and as I mentioned 9 times out of 10 its treated
                      > with other crap and presevatives.
                      >
                      > Vino es Veritas,
                      >
                      > Jim aka Waldo.
                      >
                      >
                    • Geoff
                      ... I m just south of the big river on the inland route. The Baker
                      Message 10 of 15 , Apr 19 7:50 AM
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                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mav" <mavnkaf@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >snip

                        > By the way, I 'm in the bottom (ass), end of Harry's paradise Island, about 3000 km to the south in a straight line.
                        >
                        >snip
                        >
                        > Cheers
                        > Marc

                        I'm just south of the big river on the inland route.

                        The Baker
                      • art
                        I am in central New York State  US and get cooking molasses no preservatives at $11  per gallon from a bulk food store run by local Amish.  Molasses by the
                        Message 11 of 15 , Apr 19 12:12 PM
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                          I am in central New York State  US and get cooking molasses no preservatives at $11
                           per gallon from a bulk food store run by local Amish.  Molasses by the pound at local grocery stores is about 4X this!  I use the gallon plus 2 1/2 #s brown sugar to make a 6 gal batch.  From my very basic pot still I end up with  just shy of a gallon at 72-74%.  Some spices, water and aging and I've got 80 proof  Capt Morgan type rum at less than $2 a qt (plus my labor which is pretty cheap) compared to $22/qt at the store. 
                          --- On Mon, 4/19/10, mav <mavnkaf@...> wrote:

                          .


                        • Ed Barcik
                          Try Indiana Sugar http://www.sugars.com/pr_1_26.php
                          Message 12 of 15 , Apr 20 5:39 AM
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                            Try Indiana Sugar

                             

                            http://www.sugars.com/pr_1_26.php

                             

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