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Fractional Crystalization - Re: Stripping run for Reflux Still RE:

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  • bigdaddyg851
    Thanks, waldo and mason ! i have a very cold freezer. that a this time of the year is pretty much empty . i can easily fit a five gal wash in the freezer . in
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 8, 2010
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      Thanks, waldo and mason !
      i have a very cold freezer. that a this time of the year is pretty much empty . i can easily fit a five gal wash in the freezer . in a couple of days it freezes solid .i get about seven liters of crystal clear wash witch i put an air lock on till ready to use.
      as mason said, i am going to keep what was frozen after extraction let it Thor out and run it through a pot still and see what i get.
      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hi Bigdaddy,
      >
      > Yes, im afraid Mason is correct. Fractional crystalization, freezing or
      > freeze distillation is an old way of making apple jack and other
      > fortified wines. Its based on the differential in freezing points
      > between water and ethyl alcohol (32F vs -173F). However, to get
      > sufficiently enriched alcohol levels, you need a really cold freezer
      > which most people dont have:
      >
      > 'The following will give you an idea of how concentrated the alcohol
      > can become at a given
      > temperature: at zero degrees ice will form until the liquid reaches 14%
      > alcohol by volume. At 10 below ice will form until it reaches 20%. At 20
      > below 27% can be made. And, at 30 below 33% alcohol can be obtained."
      > See: http://www.eckraus.com/wine-making-applejack.html
      > <http://www.eckraus.com/wine-making-applejack.html>
      >
      > Also, as it freezes, some of the water/alcohol mixture will freeze as
      > well, giving a richer alcohol soulution, so you will be leaving some
      > ethanol behind. Also it does nothing to take out any fusel oils as does
      > a stripping run. Read:
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_freezing
      > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_freezing> for a full
      > description.
      >
      > Vino es Veritas,
      >
      > Jim aka Waldo.
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________\
      > ____
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "bigdaddyg851" <bigdaddyg851@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > OK!, i am going to tell you what i do ! and i read it in a forum of
      > new distillers months ago . take one gallon of wash. get two empty one
      > gallon milk containers. put 2 quarts in each gal container and freeze
      > for a couple of days till frozen. you will need quart size canning jars
      > (wide mouth).take the frozen gallon milk jug with the two quarts of wash
      > and turn it upside down over the quart size canning jar extract one
      > quart (Freezer extraction).
      > > >>>> now what you have done is cut down on your boiling time . the
      > only thing left after you extract that one quart, is water! thus no need
      > for a stripping run with a reflux still because you already striped away
      > all that water in the freezer extraction .
      > > >>> if there is anybody who can tell me why this is not a good idea
      > PLEASE,i would sincerely appreciate the input . because it just makes to
      > much sense to me .
      > > bigdaddyg
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "JerryM" jkmccull@ wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I am fermenting a 10 gallon JEM wash. When it is ready, I will
      > distill using a reflux still. My goal is a neutral spirit.
      > > >
      > > > Seems to me that I could control the heat and reflux rate and do a
      > spirit run upfront without the need of a stripping run. Is there a flaw
      > in that logic?
      > > >
      > > > Any responses are apperciated.
      > > >
      > >
      >
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