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Re: First Wash

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  • rye_junkie1
    ... I use to aerate with a stone and have used 100% oxygen(from a dive shop)as well in the past. For the past year or so I have done a lot of MUM washes and
    Message 1 of 21 , Mar 1, 2010
      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "fred081646" <fred081646@...> wrote:
      >
      > I started my first sugar wash yesterday. (first ever wash) It is only a small 3 gallon wash to test out my abilities and the recipe. I am using 14g of red star active dry yeast. It started with a SG of 1.086. It is now 1.070. When checking the SG today I was getting goofy readings.
      > I noticed many CO2 bubbles in the tube. When I shook them out my hydrometer settled down. I wondered if I should aerate on the 2nd day. I am using an oxygen cylinder with 90% oxygen. I have read both pros and cons on aerating after the first day.
      >

      I use to aerate with a stone and have used 100% oxygen(from a dive shop)as well in the past. For the past year or so I have done a lot of MUM washes and my process is this. I dissolve 10lbs of sugar and the other ingredients in 1 1/2 gallons of the hottest water I can get from my tap and stir the hell out of it. Slosh it up pretty good. After that I fill a gallon water jug with cold water and pour it in from a couple of feet above the fermenter. I repeat this to the 5 gallon mark. Check the temp and pitch yeast. I do not stir it again.
      never had any issues and really cant tell any difference in ferment time, trub, or anything from the other processes.
      Aerating spirit tells a whole nother story however. One worth reading. Search "Chateau Michelin" in these groups for that when you are ready.
      As for your hydrometer readings. I just leave it in the fermenter and watch it as it goes down, day by day. Keeps you from contaminating the wash.

      Mason
    • fred081646
      Thanks a bunch Mason. What is the current MUM recipe you are using. I want to try that next. I have read good things about that recipe. Also, thanks for the
      Message 2 of 21 , Mar 1, 2010
        Thanks a bunch Mason.

        What is the current MUM recipe you are using. I want to try that next. I have read good things about that recipe.
        Also, thanks for the tip on the hydrometer, I never thought of that.
        Guess you can tell I am a newbie. LOL

        Thanks Again
        Fred


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "fred081646" <fred081646@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I started my first sugar wash yesterday. (first ever wash) It is only a small 3 gallon wash to test out my abilities and the recipe. I am using 14g of red star active dry yeast. It started with a SG of 1.086. It is now 1.070. When checking the SG today I was getting goofy readings.
        > > I noticed many CO2 bubbles in the tube. When I shook them out my hydrometer settled down. I wondered if I should aerate on the 2nd day. I am using an oxygen cylinder with 90% oxygen. I have read both pros and cons on aerating after the first day.
        > >
        >
        > I use to aerate with a stone and have used 100% oxygen(from a dive shop)as well in the past. For the past year or so I have done a lot of MUM washes and my process is this. I dissolve 10lbs of sugar and the other ingredients in 1 1/2 gallons of the hottest water I can get from my tap and stir the hell out of it. Slosh it up pretty good. After that I fill a gallon water jug with cold water and pour it in from a couple of feet above the fermenter. I repeat this to the 5 gallon mark. Check the temp and pitch yeast. I do not stir it again.
        > never had any issues and really cant tell any difference in ferment time, trub, or anything from the other processes.
        > Aerating spirit tells a whole nother story however. One worth reading. Search "Chateau Michelin" in these groups for that when you are ready.
        > As for your hydrometer readings. I just leave it in the fermenter and watch it as it goes down, day by day. Keeps you from contaminating the wash.
        >
        > Mason
        >
      • jamesonbeam1
        Hi Fred, Yes, aeration should be used only during the first several hours of fermentation (I usually aerate for just the first 4 to 6 hours). Much less if
        Message 3 of 21 , Mar 2, 2010

          Hi Fred,

          Yes, aeration should be used only during the first several hours of fermentation  (I usually aerate for just the first 4 to 6 hours).  Much less if your using 100% O2.  Our yeast friends go through several phases during this ferementation process.  Producing the alcohol is something we sort of force them to do by not providing any additional oxygen.

          The first major phase is called the lag phase which last only a few hours and is an adjustment phase for the yeast.  Next it starts the exponetial growth phase which requires dissolved O2 in the fermentation and uses this along with nutrients to multiply (usually by budding) into millions of cells per ml.  During this time the sugars are digested into CO2 and water as they grow and use up the oxygen. This usually occurs during the next 12 to 24 hours.   Next is called the  "deceleration or stationary phase" , where all the O2 is used up, growth slows down and the yeast start producing the alcohol we desire. 

          If you keep aerating after the first day or so, you will never achive the alcohol levels we are after.  This method however is used for growing yeast for cultivation purposes to keep as master stocks.  So the idea here is to keep those little buggers away from oxygen after the first day or so.  Aeration is also dependant on the strain of yeast your using.  Some, like EC-1118 require more aeration then say Bakers or Brewers yeasts.

          Dr. MB Raines Casselman has a great discussion on this from the Maltose Falcons group - you might want to read up on this aeration thing at: http://www.maltosefalcons.com/tech/yeast-propagation-and-maintenance-principles-and-practices  Below, is a quote where she futher breaks down these stages.

          Vino es Veritas,

          Jim aka Waldo.

          ________________________________________________________________________________

          I) Initially there is a lag phase.   This occurs during the first few hours after addition of the yeast.  During this time there are no apparent signs of fermentation or growth.  The yeast are becoming acclimated to their new environment.  If the previous media (or starter) is similar to this new one, acclimation will occur rapidly and the lag phase will be short.  If there are major differences in the gravity, temperature, or wort composition, the yeast may be surprised or shocked and it may take some time to adjust to this new environment.  Major changes occur within the yeast at this time, they are absorbing all of the oxygen in the wort, using it to synthesize all the enzymes and other metabolic machinery necessary for growth and fermentation, and storing oxygen up in the form of sterols for later use.  This stage is critical to fermentation and should occur as rapidly as possible, preferably within a few hours. 

          II)  The second phase is the accelerating growth phase during which yeast cells start to grow and divide.  Signs of fermentation will also become apparent.  The yeast begin storing sugar in the form of glycogen for later use.

          III)  The third phase is the exponential phase where yeast reproduction and metabolism is in high gear.  Cells are dividing every 90 - 180 minutes and fermentation begins.  During this time the number of yeast cells may increase as much as 1000-fold (or 3.0 logs) within 24 hours.  The extent to which the cells divide is dictated primarily by the pitching rate.   If appropriate pitching rates are used, the yeast are pitched at high concentrations (5-15 million yeast cells per ml) and undergo approximately 3 generations (23- or an 8-fold increase in cell number) to yield 80-100 million cells per ml.   100 million cells per ml is about the maximal concentration of yeast attainable in fermenting wort (Figure 2 &mp; 3).  Fermentation is also very active and a krausen may be beginning to form.

          IV)  The fourth phase is the decelerating growth which should occur 12-24 hours after pitching.  At this time the oxygen is fully depleted and fermentation and CO2 production is taking over.  Fermenting wort should be in high krausen.  Maximal fermentation occurs during 12-48 hours;   heat is being generated and there should be rapid CO2 evolution (bubbling).    

          Note - Krausen means that foamy head we here call a cap.  JB)       

          V)  Finally several days later, the yeast enter astationary phase.  During this time the fermentables and nutrients are completely consumed.  All yeast growth has stopped and they are beginning to fall out of suspension or flocculate.  The sterol and glycogen stored up during early growth are beginning to be broken down and used to continue growth.  Prolonged exposure in this phase (weeks) can lead to autolysis or total breakdown of the cell.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "fred081646" <fred081646@...> wrote:
          >
          > I started my first sugar wash yesterday. (first ever wash) It is only a small 3 gallon wash to test out my abilities and the recipe. I am using 14g of red star active dry yeast. It started with a SG of 1.086. It is now 1.070. When checking the SG today I was getting goofy readings.
          > I noticed many CO2 bubbles in the tube. When I shook them out my hydrometer settled down. I wondered if I should aerate on the 2nd day. I am using an oxygen cylinder with 90% oxygen. I have read both pros and cons on aerating after the first day.
          >


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "fred081646" <fred081646@...> wrote:
          >
          > I started my first sugar wash yesterday. (first ever wash) It is only a small 3 gallon wash to test out my abilities and the recipe. I am using 14g of red star active dry yeast. It started with a SG of 1.086. It is now 1.070. When checking the SG today I was getting goofy readings.
          > I noticed many CO2 bubbles in the tube. When I shook them out my hydrometer settled down. I wondered if I should aerate on the 2nd day. I am using an oxygen cylinder with 90% oxygen. I have read both pros and cons on aerating after the first day.
          >
        • rye_junkie1
          ... My roosters name is Fred. Anyway, I am using the MUM Hybrid for the most part. I just upped the sugar to 10 lbs. I am getting right at a 4 day ferment
          Message 4 of 21 , Mar 2, 2010
            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "fred081646" <fred081646@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Thanks a bunch Mason.
            >
            > What is the current MUM recipe you are using. I want to try that next. I have read good things about that recipe.

            > Thanks Again
            > Fred


            My roosters name is Fred. Anyway, I am using the MUM Hybrid for the most part. I just upped the sugar to 10 lbs. I am getting right at a 4 day ferment time. Thats plenty fast enough for me. I could probably speed that up by a day because my start method is slowing things down because of temperature. Since I top it off with cold water the temp I pitch yeast at is in the high 60's low 70's (Fahrenheit)and even with a heating pad underneath it lags for about 18 hours before it gets rolling good and the temp is up in the low 80's. Next ferment I will take the time to get the temp right before pitching and see what happens. Or just wait til spring and not have to worry about it.

            Mason,
            Yes, It gets that cold in Florida.
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