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Re: [new_distillers] Re: Mashing

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  • Jerry McCullough
    Using iodine, I tested both five gallon batches of corn mash. Both batches reacted with a dark brown color. I am guessing that I got some starch to
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 31, 2010
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      Using iodine, I tested both five gallon batches of corn mash. Both batches reacted with a dark brown color. I am guessing that I got some starch to sugar conversion but not a good conversion. I am thinking that that is why there are no visble signs that the the fermentation is progressing. Both batches smell like the yeast is working and have a sour taste. I am not sure what that means and how to progress from here.
       
      Any suggestions on the next step are appreciated.

      --- On Sat, 1/30/10, pint_o_shine <pintoshine@...> wrote:

      From: pint_o_shine <pintoshine@...>
      Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Mashing
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, January 30, 2010, 7:27 AM

       
      In order to gauge your conversions success, get some tincture of iodine from the pharmacy. Collect a small spoon full before it is converted, such as before adding barley or enzymes. Add a couple drops of the iodine liquid. You will see a blackish blue color from the reaction of the starch to the iodine. Once the conversion is well under way, the color of the test will be brown. If you get a really great conversion no color change will happen. I almost always get a light brownish color due to the stubborn starches in corn like the hard amylopectin which is really hard to convert because very careful temperature control is required.

      --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, Jerry McCullough <jkmccull@.. .> wrote:
      >
      > I just started fermenting two 5 gallon batches of what I hope is usable corn mash. One two days ago, one today. This is a first time for me and I am not sure if I have actually converted any of the corn starches to  fermentable sugars.  If the first batch is fermenting, then it is fermenting very very slowly. The potential alochol in both batches measured about 5%, but I am not sure that the reading may have been due to entrained starches or fermentable sugars. 
      >  
      > Is there some parameters that I can measure or observe that will tell me I am actually performed the mashing correctly?
      >


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