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Re: [new_distillers] Fermentation

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  • Dr. M. Legendre
    On Wed, 01 May 2002 08:58:18 -0000 ... In theory, the only penalty he should experience is extra lagtime as the initial pitch gets divided up. This works down
    Message 1 of 12 , May 1, 2002
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      On Wed, 01 May 2002 08:58:18 -0000
      "magpie2001au" <mikeltee@...> wrote:

      > His argument is that the yeast will multiply and "eat" all the
      > available sugar and I am wondering....will he incur a penalty from
      > deviding the yeast,ie, only half the normal amount (to start) in each
      > wash?

      In theory, the only penalty he should experience is extra lagtime as the
      initial pitch gets divided up. This works down to a point, where the pitch
      is so small, the lagtime so extended, that the yeasts do not really get a
      sufficient start to work.

      The yeast should multiply to the same concentration, irrespective of the
      pitching rate - provided there are sufficient numbers of them to establish
      a colony - and sufficient nutrient - probably the main concern in a thin
      wash.

      Remember that most manufacturers design their DIY products with a LOT of
      human error in mind (ever make instant cake mix?). Doing everything
      exactly right (in terms of temp, SG, pH, aeration etc.) probably gives you
      100-200% advantage over the slob, who just barely gets it to go.


      -- Dr. M. Legendre
    • cornfed62
      included in the turbo yeast package also is a quantity of nutrients for the yeast to survive and also a component that makes the wash slightly acidic. There
      Message 2 of 12 , May 1, 2002
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        included in the turbo yeast package also is a quantity of nutrients
        for the yeast to survive and also a component that makes the wash
        slightly acidic. There may be enough nutrients to do the job when
        divided, but there may be package settling during shipment. You
        might get all yeast in one bucket and all nutrient in the other.
        Just a thought. I hope it works well for you.


        --- In new_distillers@y..., "Dr. M. Legendre" <distiller@a...> wrote:
        > On Wed, 01 May 2002 08:58:18 -0000
        > "magpie2001au" <mikeltee@b...> wrote:
        >
        > > His argument is that the yeast will multiply and "eat" all the
        > > available sugar and I am wondering....will he incur a penalty
        from
        > > deviding the yeast,ie, only half the normal amount (to start) in
        each
        > > wash?
        >
        > In theory, the only penalty he should experience is extra lagtime
        as the
        > initial pitch gets divided up. This works down to a point, where
        the pitch
        > is so small, the lagtime so extended, that the yeasts do not really
        get a
        > sufficient start to work.
        >
        > The yeast should multiply to the same concentration, irrespective
        of the
        > pitching rate - provided there are sufficient numbers of them to
        establish
        > a colony - and sufficient nutrient - probably the main concern in a
        thin
        > wash.
        >
        > Remember that most manufacturers design their DIY products with a
        LOT of
        > human error in mind (ever make instant cake mix?). Doing everything
        > exactly right (in terms of temp, SG, pH, aeration etc.) probably
        gives you
        > 100-200% advantage over the slob, who just barely gets it to go.
        >
        >
        > -- Dr. M. Legendre
      • lucvanheel
        Hello All Thanks to all the people that asisted me with my fermentation problems. Thanx to a kind donation of 3 packets of tropical yeast, I have now 100L @
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 1, 2009
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          Hello All

          Thanks to all the people that asisted me with my fermentation problems.
          Thanx to a kind donation of 3 packets of tropical yeast,
          I have now 100L @ 15% bubling away, you can actually here it working if you put your ear to the barrel, wonderfull sound in my ears...lol
          I have gotten leads on 2 more sources for other brands of yeast for tropical climates, can't wait to try these to.
          From being a pain, it's now becomming fun.Moral don't give up to quick, the more you have to try, the sweeter(pun intended) the result when it works out.

          Kind Regards

          Luc Vanheel
        • jamesonbeam1
          Luc, Sounds good. Just remember you can re-use that trub or barm 10 or 12 times (Ive used the same barm 20 plus times with no problems), if you ever get in
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 2, 2009
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            Luc,

            Sounds good. Just remember you can re-use that trub or "barm" 10 or 12
            times (Ive used the same barm 20 plus times with no problems), if you
            ever get in the same fix again. Just keep it in the refridge till your
            ready.

            Vino es Veritas,

            Jim aka Waldo.


            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "lucvanheel" <ethyl@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello All
            >
            > Thanks to all the people that asisted me with my fermentation
            problems.
            > Thanx to a kind donation of 3 packets of tropical yeast,
            > I have now 100L @ 15% bubling away, you can actually here it working
            if you put your ear to the barrel, wonderfull sound in my ears...lol
            > I have gotten leads on 2 more sources for other brands of yeast for
            tropical climates, can't wait to try these to.
            > From being a pain, it's now becomming fun.Moral don't give up to
            quick, the more you have to try, the sweeter(pun intended) the result
            when it works out.
            >
            > Kind Regards
            >
            > Luc Vanheel
            >
          • Derek
            My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I m still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn t have a
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 18, 2013
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              My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I'm still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn't have a sweet taste, So my question is, is it done now or do I need to wait longer.
            • RLB
              I had a batch ferment for 35 days before I did a stripping run, and it would have gone longer.  If it tastes bitter, it s ready. Robert
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 18, 2013
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                I had a batch ferment for 35 days before I did a stripping run, and it would have gone longer.  If it tastes bitter, it's ready.

                Robert


                From: Derek <justweldit41@...>
                To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 12:35 PM
                Subject: [new_distillers] Fermentation

                 
                My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I'm still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn't have a sweet taste, So my question is, is it done now or do I need to wait longer.



              • Bill Rogers
                test it with a hydrometer.
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 18, 2013
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                  test it with a hydrometer.


                  On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 11:35 AM, Derek <justweldit41@...> wrote:
                   

                  My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I'm still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn't have a sweet taste, So my question is, is it done now or do I need to wait longer.


                • David Eastham
                  Why dont you invest in a hydrometer, takes the guess work out of the equation. In answer to your question, yes its probably done. Dave E
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 18, 2013
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                    Why dont you invest in a hydrometer, takes the guess work out of the equation. In answer to your question, yes its probably done.
                    Dave E
                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Derek" <justweldit41@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I'm still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn't have a sweet taste, So my question is, is it done now or do I need to wait longer.
                    >
                  • White Bear
                    Derek- I agree with Dave, it is done.  I made wine for 40+ years most of them without a hydrometer and have come up with some very fine stuff.  Check out
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 18, 2013
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                      Derek-
                      I agree with Dave, it is done.  I made wine for 40+ years most of them without a hydrometer and have come up with some very fine stuff.  Check out your fermentation lock and count the times it bubbles.  If it is above 1 per minute it is done and ready for your next step.
                       
                      White Bear
                       
                      P.S. Do invest in a hydrometer, there is more to it then just checking if your mash is done.
                       
                       

                      From: David Eastham <planetgong0@...>
                      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 4:34 PM
                      Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Fermentation
                       

                      Why dont you invest in a hydrometer, takes the guess work out of the equation. In answer to your question, yes its probably done.
                      Dave E
                      --- In mailto:new_distillers%40yahoogroups.com, "Derek" wrote:
                      >
                      > My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I'm still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn't have a sweet taste, So my question is, is it done now or do I need to wait longer.
                      >

                    • Derek
                      Thank you Dave and White Bear, I had bought a hydrometer, but it was for distilled product, so ill have to get another one, thank you for the info. This is my
                      Message 10 of 12 , Feb 18, 2013
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                        Thank you Dave and White Bear,
                        I had bought a hydrometer, but it was for distilled product, so ill have to get another one, thank you for the info. This is my first mash so its all new to me.
                        Thanks again

                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, White Bear <sha_man_1@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Derek-
                        > I agree with Dave, it is done.  I made wine for 40+ years most of them without a hydrometer and have come up with some very fine stuff.  Check out your fermentation lock and count the times it bubbles.  If it is above 1 per minute it is done and ready for your next step.
                        >  
                        > White Bear
                        >  
                        > P.S. Do invest in a hydrometer, there is more to it then just checking if your mash is done.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: David Eastham <planetgong0@...>
                        > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 4:34 PM
                        > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Fermentation
                        >
                        >
                        >  
                        >
                        >
                        > Why dont you invest in a hydrometer, takes the guess work out of the equation. In answer to your question, yes its probably done.
                        > Dave E
                        > --- In mailto:new_distillers%40yahoogroups.com, "Derek" wrote:
                        > >
                        > > My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I'm still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn't have a sweet taste, So my question is, is it done now or do I need to wait longer.
                        > >
                        >
                      • Derek
                        Thank you Dave and White Bear, I had bought a hydrometer, but it was for distilled product, so ill have to get another one, thank you for the info. This is my
                        Message 11 of 12 , Feb 18, 2013
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                          Thank you Dave and White Bear,
                          I had bought a hydrometer, but it was for distilled product, so ill have to get another one, thank you for the info. This is my first mash so its all new to me.
                          Thanks again

                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, White Bear <sha_man_1@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Derek-
                          > I agree with Dave, it is done.  I made wine for 40+ years most of them without a hydrometer and have come up with some very fine stuff.  Check out your fermentation lock and count the times it bubbles.  If it is above 1 per minute it is done and ready for your next step.
                          >  
                          > White Bear
                          >  
                          > P.S. Do invest in a hydrometer, there is more to it then just checking if your mash is done.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ________________________________
                          > From: David Eastham <planetgong0@...>
                          > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 4:34 PM
                          > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Fermentation
                          >
                          >
                          >  
                          >
                          >
                          > Why dont you invest in a hydrometer, takes the guess work out of the equation. In answer to your question, yes its probably done.
                          > Dave E
                          > --- In mailto:new_distillers%40yahoogroups.com, "Derek" wrote:
                          > >
                          > > My mash has been going for six or seven days now, And I'm still getting small bubbles coming up through it but it is cleared up pretty good, It doesn't have a sweet taste, So my question is, is it done now or do I need to wait longer.
                          > >
                          >
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