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Re: Fermenting on grains without sparge

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  • jamesonbeam1
    Hi J, Probably because many of us have been away or enjoying the holidays. To boil down your questions, (sorry for the pun), I believe most distillers dont
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 2, 2010
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      Hi J,

      Probably because many of us have been away or enjoying the holidays.

      To boil down your questions,  (sorry for the pun), I believe most distillers dont sparge, but just ferment on the grain, then squeeze as much liquid as possible from the grains.  Personally, I use a 5 gallon paint bag for this.

      I believe basically your asking how much grain to use per gallon of mash.  If your interested in an all malt whisk(e)y, without any added sugars,  this really depends on the type of malt (and/or  grains) your using and the potential yield of sugars per pound.  These numbers usuall range anywhere from around 50% to 80%, with lets say around 65%  to 70% yield being average. 

      To really wet your whistle, do some reading on Tony's Homedistillers site.  See:  http://homedistiller.org/wash-grain.htm#whisky and http://homedistiller.org/yield.htm

      Personally, I would try around 5.0 to 5.5  gallons of water for 10 lbs. of  malt which would give you about a 1.055 SG or a potential of ~7.5  ABV with a 70% yield without boiling away any water.  But since I usually dont do all grain mashes, this is just going by the numbers.  (remember we're not making 5% beer here,  we want a mash of 7% to 8% for distilling).

      Vino es Veritas,

      Jim aka Waldo.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "j_klinck" <j_klinck@...> wrote:
      >
      > Bump. Didn't get any hits on this post.
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "j_klinck" j_klinck@ wrote:
      > >
      > > I have another fermenting on grains question. Here are two examples below, one being a beer mash and another being a whiskey mash.
      > >
      > > Beer mash
      > > 10 lbs of grain
      > > 1.5qts of water per pound of grain
      > > 3.75 (15qts) gallons of water for mash
      > > 5 gallons of water for sparge
      > >
      > > Whiskey mash
      > > 10 lbs of grain
      > > Being as there won't be a sparge would you just use the same total amount of water that you would for both the mash and sparge? This would have me using 8.75 gallons of water for the mash. But I won't be boiling for 1.5 hours like I do for the beer and boiling off 1.5 gallons of wort, so I should use 1.5 less gallons of water, right? Therefore, in a 5.5 gallon whiskey mash (one where you end up with 5 gallons of wash) with ten pounds of malt I would use 7.25 gallons of water for the mash. Does this sound right?
      > >
      >

    • jamesonbeam1
      Sidenote J, If your doing a single malt whiskey and just using malt it is a good idea to seperate the grain before fermenting. As Ian Smiley mentions: If
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 2, 2010
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        Sidenote J,

        If your doing a single malt whiskey and just using malt it is a good idea to seperate the grain before fermenting.  As Ian Smiley mentions:

        "If you're doing an all-grain mash of corn, rye, and or wheat, just ferment it all on the grain and strain it out later. It'll strain much more easily and efficiently after the fermentation. In fact, this is exactly what the commercial whiskey distilleries do.

        If you're making an all-barley-malt malt mash, you should sparge the grains out after mashing. Again, this is the way the commercial malt whiskey distilleries do it. However, keep in mind that malt mash does not undergo a kettle-boil the way an all-grain beer mash does, so you must limit the amount of sparge water you use or you'll over dilute the mash. "

        JB.


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hi J,
        >
        > Probably because many of us have been away or enjoying the holidays.
        >
        > To boil down your questions, (sorry for the pun), I believe most
        > distillers dont sparge, but just ferment on the grain, then squeeze as
        > much liquid as possible from the grains. Personally, I use a 5 gallon
        > paint bag for this.

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